Jump to content

I don't know which way to hammer out the oil seal on the timing cover?


MarcDeSoto

Recommended Posts

Just asking for a friend ..... does the manual show a felt gasket?

 

I have only replaced these seals on vehicles 30 years newer  .....  never was a felt gasket involved.

 

The new seal is a interference fit into the case. It should not be sloppy, it needs to be driven in to make a good seal.

The rubber  rides on the crank pulley making a seal.

 

Just saying .... My friend does not see a need for a felt gasket .... what do I know.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think you'll find it goes on the outside of the timing cover and slides over the hub before you install it.  Where does your parts book show the cork?  Between the hub and cover or between the cover and seal?

 

Leave the RTV in the tube.  It is not needed anywhere on that engine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Lets be honest here and back the truck up.

Earlier photo's showed you are a good candidate for a speedi sleeve.

Your pulley looked terrible. I'm calling out others that have used them possibly offer advice.

 

You now have the old seal out, will be several hours getting things perfectly cleaned .... getting a sleeve for the job .... fitting it. ..... Your journey is just beginning ... you will not just slap a new seal in it & get on with your day.

 

I have been wrong before.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Speedi sleeve is already on.  It went on as it was supposed to, no issues so the hub is now usable.

 

Support for the cover to install the new seal may or may not be on hand.  A trip to the hardware store with the seal and cover in hand should be able to locate a pipe coupler of the correct diameter ( not PVC) or a socket ( more expensive than coupler).

 

Yes, it's supposed to be simple.  Doesn't always happen.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

58 minutes ago, Dave72dt said:

I think you'll find it goes on the outside of the timing cover and slides over the hub before you install it.  Where does your parts book show the cork?  Between the hub and cover or between the cover and seal?

 

Leave the RTV in the tube.  It is not needed anywhere on that engine.

Yep, it is dust shield to lessen wear on the seal itself.   Was a big thing, great idea back when these things were operated a lot on dirt and/or gravel roads.   Still not a bad idea, just not as needed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From other pics of the cover and hub, it doesn't look like there is a lot of room between them.  With one stationary and one rotating part, what's to prevent that felt from getting hot or rubbing through the cover?  Perhaps it would be better to leave it out.  Considering the car's likely future usage and mileage the more I think about it, the more I would choose to leave it out.

 

Keith's video, page 1 shows correct install of felt.  Heat is NOT an issue.  Disregard this post.

Edited by Dave72dt
added info
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Page 1 of this thread. I posted my video. Did anyone watch it?

 

At 4:51 mark. Look at the large felt washer.  See it? I had also installed a speedi sleeve on the pulley hub too. I recorded it and posted the separate video on YT. 
 

Edited by keithb7
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So it goes exactly where I said it should.  It barely shows at 4.51 and is not pointed out, it does show you oiling the hub ( and felt) and the seal.  At 4:50ish to 6  you give a good view of it behind the hub.  Apparently my concerns about the heat are unfounded and therefore the felt should be installed as shown.

 

Thanks Keith

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 minutes ago, Dave72dt said:

So it goes exactly where I said it should.  It barely shows at 4.51 and is not pointed out, it does show you oiling the hub ( and felt) and the seal.  At 4:50ish to 6  you give a good view of it behind the hub. 

At 6:31 you can see it sandwiched between the pulley and the front cover.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just cause I wanted to whack the horse 1 more time:

 

In my 1953/54 Mopar parts book I am comparing the L6 and the V8 engines.

The 6 does not show a felt dust seal in the parts diagram.  The V8 engine does show the dust deal in the parts diagram. Yet in the parts listings I see a dust seal part number for every single 6 and V8 engine is listed.

6 cyl  #1328250,  V8 # 1328250.  Funny hey? Imagine that.

 

No wonder there is so much confusion and we are 3 pages in and about 800 views to change 1 seal.

I am now done whacking the horse. Send it to the glue factory.

Edited by keithb7
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are many-a-damaged timing covers out there. Many that will no longer hold oil in. Just sayin....

Edited by keithb7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just went to HD and found what I think is a good support for the timing cover.  It is a 3" ABS black pipe coupler.  It costs about $5.  Thanks for all the replies!  This material will be great for my new book,  Restoring Flathead Mopars for Dummies.  

Edited by MarcDeSoto
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had a good chuckle yesterday morning  reading this thread from start to finish while I was having coffee...Helpful advice mixed with a little humor...That was yesterday.😊

Edited by Ralph D25cpe
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It just goes to show that not everything in restoration flows as easily as it looks in the Youtube videos.  Especially if you are not a mechanic.  I think the timing cover seal is an important part of the engine and deserves a close look to do it right so you don't have a oil leaker when you finish your restoration.  I looked for an iron coupler, but couldn't find one.  I think plumbing has gone all plastic.  And I wonder how a dead horse got into this thread?  Totally off topic.  

Edited by MarcDeSoto
Link to comment
Share on other sites

An old saying was.........."to flog a dead horse"........meaning that sometimes a person can do something over & over again without any success,ie, you can flog or whip a dead horse to get it to move but it still won't move.....its dead........lol........andyd  

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I put on the oil seal today in my timing cover.  Sniper and others were right when they said the 1 ton Arbor Press would not do the trick.  I pressed the seal in with the seal installer tool that I rented from O'Reillys.  The ABS black pipe coupler was all that was needed for a back support.  I didn't need to hit the seal with a sledge hammer, just the installer disc and a series light firm taps with a mallet.  Now I'm ready to reassemble the front end of the engine and put the oil pan back on.  Besides using a cherry picker, what is the best way to support the front of the engine after I take the front motor mount off?  I just jacked the engine up from the bottom side of the block, and put jack stands under the bottom edges of the front of the block.

P1030233.JPG

P1030231.JPG

P1030232.JPG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.

Terms of Use