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kencombs

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kencombs last won the day on December 22 2019

kencombs had the most liked content!

About kencombs

  • Rank
    Senior Member, have way too much spare time on my hands
  • Birthday 02/11/1943

Contact Methods

  • Yahoo
    antiquesetc@sbcglobal.net
  • Occupation
    ret

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    claremore, ok
  • Interests
    old trucks obviously, any 30/40/50 vehicle. Woodworking, welding, painting etc.
  • My Project Cars
    56 1/2T

Converted

  • Location
    claremore ok
  • Interests
    old cars and woodworking

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  1. If it gets past the valves, it will be in either the intake or exhaust manifold. If exhaust, it will just make it's way out of the muffler and tailpipe. At worst, lots of smoke. If intake, also lots of smoke as all of it will be burned if/when the engine starts. With no plugs, nothing will happen, except for making a mess. With plugs, no mess, also no danger of hydro lock IF the fluid isn't in any cylinder.
  2. Crate motor should have a warranty that covers oil leaks from factory installed seals. IMO, you don't have an oil problem, you have a seal problem. The seal conditioners sometimes work on older seals that have hardened. Most of them have some ingredient that attacks rubber and softens it. Probably would do the same to a new, soft seal. Just not sure what the results are. Back in the day, brake fluid was the 'seal fix' of choice of some mechanics.
  3. In addition to the last two posts, the fact that you disconnected the ammeter does not prove it to be at fault. It was really common to feed other loads off the ammeter, especially aftermarket doodads. So there may be an added load somewhere. It would be really helpful for you to draw out the wiring as it exists, and compare to a stock drawing. I'd almost bet that the problem would become clear once you commit the 'as built' to paper (or computer screen). A true short to ground would result in hot wire and smoke, so my money is on a hidden load. Or, I'm still not clear on what type of alternator installation you have. One wire, three wire, diode or light bulb to prevent back-feed or???
  4. : Almost stock flattie. Manifold and block ports gasket matched and ports cleaned up a bit. Head milled a bunch, then the chamber modified around the valve and spark plug area. Wound up at about 8.9: 1 ratio. Stock intake modified to accept a small two barrel Carter BB2 originally on a 273 V8.
  5. Easiest solution would be to have a rebuilder install high pressure springs and a high friction lining. But , that comes a cost. I had a Pontiac with a really HD setup. Couldn't set a long red light with the clutch down! Heavy as heck on the pedal, but didn't slip. There are also 11" clutches/flywheels. I think I have one left from my project,
  6. I wrestled with that decision and ultimately it came down to the A833 I'm using. #2 selection was a non-electronic version of the A500. Essentially an A904 with OD added. 518 was third choice. Some version of an OD was mandatory in my mind as I wanted to retain the ability to pull a trailer (lower rear gears) and have good acceleration in traffic yet cruise at a lower rpm. The 500 smaller, lighter, uses slightly less HP to operate and is strong enough for my use. If I needed a stronger auto it would have been the 518. In the end, I decided to go with a manual and chose the A833 over the more popular T5. Tough trans and it's Mopar.
  7. Can you clarify the wiring you have installed? I seem to be missing something in the design. What type of alternator and external VR do you have? Do you have an ammeter or indicator light? Blocking diode? I agree with Sam, a relay isn't needed except to cover up some other issue. Fix the root cause, don't complicate the installation would be my advice.
  8. Yep, traces of rust left in the bore and take a look at the pitting on the intake valves. Surely had water in it at some time, for a fairly long time I'd guess. But, doesn't mean it's not a viable core, if the price right. As to the piston markings, I've seen a lot of overhauls done and done some myself where the cylinders were OK, but a piston or two had broken or worn ring lands . In my 230 that just got put back together it had 2 #3 rods on a set of .060 pistons. Old rebuild with a bad rod so they used one from another engine. Common in the rebuilder world. Just wish they had remarked it. Fortunately I have a habit of punch marking them anyway.
  9. Time Left: 26 days and 11 hours

    • WANTED
    • USED

    Need a crankshaft pulley with 2 grooves so I can add a power steering pump. My pulley setup is from a 56 Plymouth. It is 3 pcs, a hub that bolts the crank with one large bolt, then a single sheave pulley, followed by the harmonic dampener. The whole works is held together with 6 bolts on an unevenly spaced circle so it only goes together one way, sorta like our flywheels. Looking at both a conversion to a serpentine setup and just adding another pulley. Decision will likely be based on availability of either.

    NO VALUE SPECIFIED

    , Oklahoma - US

  10. two groove crankshaft pulley 230 View Advert Need a crankshaft pulley with 2 grooves so I can add a power steering pump. My pulley setup is from a 56 Plymouth. It is 3 pcs, a hub that bolts the crank with one large bolt, then a single sheave pulley, followed by the harmonic dampener. The whole works is held together with 6 bolts on an unevenly spaced circle so it only goes together one way, sorta like our flywheels. Looking at both a conversion to a serpentine setup and just adding another pulley. Decision will likely be based on availability of either. Advertiser kencombs Date 02/19/2020 Price Category Individual Member Classified Wanted Ad  
  11. I would prefer to use metal tubing if possible. All the remote full flow add on filters I've seen here use hoses. It will be done with hoses if needed but would really like metal.
  12. Yeah, and did you notice the 3500 dollar O/D? I sold mine way to cheap I guess.
  13. Resistor value is/was mismatched to the load. Resistors for motor speed control has been common in vehicles for years as that is how many multispeed heater blowers have been implemented. Just need to find the right combination.
  14. I looked at that one,and several others on the bay. All appear to be 208, 220 or 240v input with a Pulse Width Modulated DC output. A lot of them are listed as LED dimmers, so they do the AC/DC conversion and vary the pulse width to control the brightness. I'm sure there are PWM controllers made with 12v dc in, but I'd bet they cost a lot more than the ones I looked at.
  15. As noted by the first response, Clearance is determined by the piston design and material and can change from maker to maker, even in the same engine. This was copied from the Wiseco web page: Cast pistons with an integral expansion strut were commonplace for many years and they still provide very reliable service in low-power, low-rpm situations. Close to a century ago, the addition of 12 percent silicon as an alloying constituent was found to significantly stabilize the expansion of aluminum components, such as pistons. Known as eutectic-aluminum-silicon alloy, it permitted the development of cast, high-silicon pistons with up to 20 percent silicon alloy. These are known as hypereutectic pistons and their chief advantage is a very low expansion rate. They can be installed with as little as 0.0005-inch piston-to-wall clearance on the major diameter. Note the last sentence.
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