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keithb7

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keithb7 last won the day on June 29

keithb7 had the most liked content!

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Western Canada
  • Interests
    Vintage Mopars
  • My Project Cars
    1938 Chrysler Royal C18 Coupe

    1938 Plymouth P6 Deluxe Sedan

    1953 Chrysler Windsor Deluxe C60-2.

Contact Methods

  • Biography
    Hobby Mechanic
  • Occupation
    Mining

Converted

  • Location
    Western Canada
  • Interests
    Vintage Cars

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5,949 profile views
  1. I am packing the trunk tonight. I'm inspecting my Plymouth sedan closely. Checking everything. I am indeed taking it on a road trip. About 3 hours drive each way. Farthest trip yet for me and my Plymouth. This trip if I come back unscathed, will take me over the edge. Beyond any reservations I've had about traveling outside earlier comfort range in an 84 year old car. I've packed up some tools, extra gasoline, hi-way triangle warning signs, checked the jack and spare, (It was flat, never checked it before. Oops) Extra Oil, brake fluid, water and more. She got all new hoses and belts last winter. Rad rebuilt. New water pump. She's good to go. I am going to get under there with the grease gun now and hit every nipple. I had planned to make this trip 2 years ago. Forest fires kept me home. Then the engine came out for an overhaul. Sorta glad I never went 2 years ago, knowing what I know now! Lol. The engine had broken top piston rings. Could have been a mess. Just me & the pooch and my AAA card. Should be a fun day. I'll depart at 5AM local time and hit the super hi-way over a mountain pass. I'll meet my brother and his vintage car at a large car show. We'll go in together and hang out for the day, talking cars all day. My big brother was a car guy before me. Only because he turned 16 first. We rebuilt a couple engines together when we were in high school. Outside, laying on plywood in the backyard, lining up trannies and clutches. Good times. We got 'er done though and it gave me the confidence to keep at it for the rest of my life. Really looking forward to the road trip. Some alone time, a hot coffee on the road. Hangin out with my brother. Will post pics of any Flathead Mopars at the show or of me on a tow hook. Lol. We shall see!
  2. Works for me. I mounted a 6V to 12V converter tucked up behind the glove box. Tied into the fuel gauge power wire. Powered by turning on the ignition switch. 2 years later it still charges fine for me.
  3. I’ve been reading a book on American Automobile history. Written in 1965. It’s perfect for me. I’m not overly interested in anything newer than that. Lol. My 1938 Plymouth is an example of the 10th year of the Plymouth line. Henry Ford had totally dominated the low price car market for many years. No other car manufacturer seemed to be able to compete with Ford’s mass produced assembly line, low cost, Model T. He was losing the gap though. Eventually he had to accept that it was time for a change. The Model T had run its course. In 1928 the Ford factories closed as they re-tool’d and prepared for the newest, upgraded Ford. What a perfect time for Walter Chrysler to release his new low-priced Plymouth line. I suppose you couldn’t buy a low priced new Ford in 1928, but hey this new Plymouth looks pretty swell. And loaded with features! Was the 1928 Plymouth a choreographed release for Chrysler? Or just pure luck? The next year the 1929 Ford Model A was revealed. Walter had already won a lot of new customers by then. His entry priced Plymouth started at $670. The 1928 4 dr 5 passenger sedan was $725. My 1938 Plymouth 5 passenger P6 Deluxe sedan was priced at $803. Here we are at the pump tonight. A fine, fine summer evening cruise. I’m getting great value back on that engine rebuild. 212 miles.
  4. @Sniperwhat power brake bleeder? Do tell.
  5. I sent my brake band to local rebuilder. Right off the top he said, "I know I don't have the proper thickness brake material. All that I can get is either too thick or too thin. It's difficult to source. I have not been able to get some for a long time. If you want it right, I will cut a thin metal spacer band. It will go behind the material and shim it to the proper thickness needed". I was grateful and indeed gave him my permission to build the shim, and make it right. He did so. It was a great fit. The brake works awesome. When I first installed it, I too set it too close to the drum. 15 minutes into a drive I could smell this odd burning odor. At a stop light I saw smoke drifting up aside my door window. I immediately pulled over. I rolled under the car, in the gravel. I cut the lock wire off and backed out the adjustment screws. All good, until I got home later and set it up properly. That was 3 years ago and its been great ever since. Good chance, based on this info, the aftermarket sellers today aren't going the extra step to shim it. I'd wager there are plenty of folks out there buying aftermarket relined driveline brake pads that perform mediocre at best. Too thick material it won't fit. Too small, it won't work all that good. I have found some aftermarket sellers to be pretty dirty. Be careful.
  6. I know we are bit infected with our old Mopars.Today I drove 2.5 hrs each way to go the the largest car show in my region. Walked around and never saw 1 old flathead era Mopar. I thought I saw a couple trucks. Nope hopped-up V8’s and such. Not sure I recall seeing more than 1 stock old vehicle. It was a 70’s VW. I guess I should have entered one of my old cars. Very good chance I’d have won “Survivor” category at least. Lol. I’ve pretty-well lost interest in all the hot rods and muscle cars. There’s just so many around. Saturated market it seems. I guess I am sick.
  7. Lately these dumb ads keep popping up here in my P15-D24 pages. What purpose does this serve anyone? I guess it helps the fuel pump and fuel injector folks make a living. Mechanics too I guess. I can’t say I’ve ever searched or clicked on anything to lead to this type of directed advertising. Just dumb.
  8. Someone got me. Arriving at the show.
  9. I drove just over 100 miles today. On the hi-way to a car small car show. It was neat to see so much interest in my 38 Plymouth. Tons on inquiries. I also met some new friends. Flathead Mopar owners. Of course we hit-it-off and shared contact info. One fellow offered me a complete rolling chassis from a 1940 Dodge sedan . From rad to exhaust pipe tip. All powertrain, rad. Brakes. Axles. Engine. Tranny. I may just take it. Some more good spare parts. Plus I can move some along to others in need. Another older fellow was grateful we met. Perhaps I can help him maintain his old Mopar. Sounds like he’s new to them. His car, he just bought 6 months ago. I saw a nice ‘35 Dodge coupe today. Was a great little show. Real nice folks and some great cars. I hit some inclement weather. My 1 vacuum wiper worked well.
  10. A very pleasant evening cruise in my Plymouth tonight. Its getting close to the northern hemisphere summer solstice. Nice long warm evenings. At 10:15 pm I’d say it was finally dark. The engine is getting smoother and better performing. The rings must be seating nicely. Its so quiet you can almost hear the spark jumping the gap inside the distributor cap. What a fine machine. Odometer 51.7 miles.
  11. In Canada, the best love you can give a flathead with a carb and a mechanical fuel pump…Marked marine gas. No ethanol. No road tax. Premium octane for the price of regular. Illegal of course but that’s a risk I’m willing to take tonight for the old girl. She sure runs great on it. She loves it!
  12. A nice day off work today. An afternoon in the Shoppe de ‘38.
  13. On my regular under-car inspection today I found a disaster in the making. My Battery cable from the negative post to the starter. A little wiggle and I saw sparks. My ‘38 Chrysler. Keep up on your cables folks. They make great fire starters.
  14. I've been running 7 psi cap with my 1953 block. Internal head by-pass. Non-stock, rebuilt pressurized rad.
  15. Coming up the hill home yesterday my stock coolant temp gage hit 212. I stopped and used a laser thermometer get a reading at the cylinder head precisely where the probe threads into the cylinder head. It read 180F. Bottom of rad tank measured 138F. My gauge certainly is the issue.
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