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  1. This 3rd of September, we took the Plymouth again for 2 weeks in Italy. I had put a new alternator this spring to replace a shot generator, but it but unfortunately failed in August too. So I had to put a working spare generator which was on hand. Usually, I carry all my spare parts behind the spare wheel, but now I had no time to repair the shot one. We don´t have the autotrain/ sleeping car choice anymore, in Germany they cancelled the whole service! Because of this, we planned to drive the whole trip by car and to stay overnight on both ways. First trip was 400 mls to beautiful Neuschwanstein (castle looms over the hood!). Next morning we continued through Austria 225 mls to Lake Garda/ Italy. We we met traffic jam everywhere. The worse was on the Autobahn incline from Innsbruck up to Brennero in full summer heat. After 1 1/2 hour of stop and go the poor Plymouth´s cluch began to overheat- which forced me to take the next available exit to ÖAMTC (= austrian AAA) grounds. There, I let the car cool down and asked for a connection off the Autobahn to continue on the old Brenner country road. There was none, they told me. Downhill back to Innsbruck to the next exit was the same jam. In the meantime, however, my wife had found an alternative on her cell phone. But stupidly this earth and gravel path seemed only to lead to a quarry and was forbidden for cars. We took it anyway, trusting the cell phone, hoping to reach the old Brenner road. At the Brenner- railroad site we met a group of workers and asked if we would be able to continue. They did not recommend because of a very heavy grade down and a disastrous condition of the road. I dared and made it, but it was extremely steep and the passage under the railroad line absolutely tight. My brave wife had turned quite pale and was happy when we reached our hotel in Gargnano! We had 2 beautiful problemless weeks making 700 mls visiting Brescia, Torino and a lot of small Piemonte towns. (RR crossing near Acqui Terme) (our stylish Samsonites in a stylish Hotel!) (Agliano -Villa Fontana: Piemonte is vine, truffles and hazelnuts!) (near Agliano Terme) Then, we started to the return trip to have 2 nights at Freiburg. At the Milan tollgate again we suffered 1 ½ hour of stop and go in full heat. Now I noticed that the battery was no longer being charged. I changed the voltage regulator - but obviously it was not the culprit. Well, and as I had mentioned before, this time I didn´t have a spare generator on board! Nevertheless, we tried to reach Freiburg, still 250 mls away. We only used parking lights in the numerous tunnels in Switzerland (all one way only and speed restricted) and used as little electricity as possible except for the ignition. Above all, the generator developed an ugly bearing noise. For the last 30 mls in darkness lo beam lights were needed. With 6,6 V at Milan, voltage dropped to 5,9 V when arriving at the Hotel´s garage in Freiburg. That drive was no pleasure! The next morning the ADAC (= german AAA) picked up the car - I would have risked a day drive 300 mls to Düssseldorf with freshly (Hotel-) charged battery, but I did not want to experience the generator bearing´s falilure! We had a beautiful day in Freiburg. The next day, I got a free rental car for the trip home from the ADAC. As I had no hurry they brought The Plymouth to my mechanic in Essen 4 weeks later. In the meantime, I had repaired the other gererator and he could exchange them. Now, the car is ok in his own garage. My wife don´t want to go next summer to hot Italy in Plymouth! Maybe we go to my sister in colder and traffic jam free Helsingborg/ Sweden! Greetings from Düsseldorf! Go (red: travel 2022. The dots are our older Plymouth holidays). Places visited: Düsseldorf: yellow dot red: travel 2022. The dots are our older Plymouth holidays 1 Neuschwanstein 2 Brennero 3 Gargnano 4 Brescia 5 Agliano Terme 6 Nizza Monferrato 7 Acqui Terme 8 Alba 9 Asti 10 Torino 11 Bra 16 Freiburg
    11 points
  2. Probably the last wonderful weather week for getting my cars out for their final drive of the season.... This is my 1952 Belvedere I have owned since 1972...
    9 points
  3. personally I don't think the majority of these cars and engines are near as tired as their owners.....🤡
    8 points
  4. Here is a prime reason why everyone should have a fire extinguisher in their car, modern and or antique. The FE should always be in a spot where you can always get to it easily. Also, when you all now go out to your car you should also check the expiration date on the label or the date of manufacturer. Most FE have a lfe span of 10-11 years. The date of manufacturer might be on the label or even stamped on the bottom of the FE. This also goes for the FE's i your home. Also Check the date of manufacturer of your smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors. They also have a shelf life of 10 Years and Since it now winter or late fall replace all of the batteries in your Smoke detectors and CM detectors. The cost of a $2 battery just might save your life. When you put the new battery in each unit put some masking tape around it and mark the date of installation so that each year you know when a fresh battery was installed and periodically test each of these units. I do this every October which is known as Fire Prevention Month when I was in school. Rich Hartung Desoto1939@aol.com
    6 points
  5. A bit more progress. And a hiccup or two...grille guard installed, not specific to Chrysler Corp but period correct. Shortened it by about two inches to allow placement of foglamp/front indicators. Also detailed my original front bumper medallion in red. Saw a nos one on epay in the original red and was impressed. Only ever knew mine as a flaky chrome but looks quite nice in the red I think. As shown before, seatbelts installed. Had a ram etched on the lift plates to try to make them a little less out of character Rear hand straps/coat hooks and re-secured headliner... Front carpet. Was originally a rubber mat floor in the car and I did manage to get a pretty nice reproduction from the Plymouth doctor years ago but have gone with a carpet finish for now...also note the fuel gauge out. Wasn't reading down past a quarter tank so took it out and had it recalibrated with the sender unit. Not quite perfect but is pretty good all the way down now. Sort of tested it in quarter tank increments and am happy with how it goes for the 84 year old technology... Rear carpet which is as close as I could match the style and color to the original in the car... Added front armrests to the front doors so I wouldn't put strain on the interior door handles when closing the doors. My car never had these but they are an accessory in the parts book for the model so I found some old ones and had them recovered in leather left over from the seats... The other hiccup I have had has been a bit more troublesome. After about 300 miles of test driving a crack developed in the head from under the thermostat housing. Had it repaired but it has failed again so am trying another head to get me going. A bit disappointing as the head that has cracked is original to the car. Haven't given up completely on getting it fixed yet but am looking for another machine shop who can do a better job. So this, and the door sill plates are the last things to resolve before the serious driving can begin. Have had lots of wins and setbacks over this project but am keen to see it out. Want to drive around to numerous cousins near and afar who would remember our shared grandfather and his car. We are all in our 50s, 60s and 70s now ourselves. Some of them know that the car is still around and being brought back to life, others will get a real surprise. Also I would like to show it to a bunch of folks that have done work on various things - chrome, badges, tires, upholstery, parts, advice etc. They all will get a kick out of seeing the finished product. Not long now I hope...
    5 points
  6. ggdad1951

    Todd Build Thread

    Cowl vent in....under 12V power! 23800.mp4
    5 points
  7. Hello, new here. I picked up this truck earlier this year as a project for my son and I to work on. It was missing the motor and trans but otherwise complete and in really nice shape considering all the wood in it. I’m working on a game plan and list of things needed.
    4 points
  8. I am of the belief that a person with an engine hoist at home, and a load leveller, would still be better better off to remove the tranny first. Then lift the engine, clutch and FD out together. If this is video of any use to you, here is what I did. 3 speed manual though. No fluid drive. When I put my engine back in, I did remove the rad nose cone. Much easier. I realize you have a later model ‘51 year car. I just thought this might give you some perspective. Also see the tools and safery tips I recommend.
    4 points
  9. Few days early on the posting but not sure what my computer availability will be toward end of week. Three day swap meet coming up and a few buds will be coming to vend and staying with me a couple days. They are all veterans...we all retired military through the reserves and worked in the electronics shop civil service. Anyway, a hats off salute to those that served. I just last week put together a shadowbox to honor my dad's service in WWII...enlisted in USAAF 1944 and in 1945 was Corps of Cadet when a training injury left him unable to continue service. Thanks again to those that served....some the best times I have had in my life were my military adventures. I also think anyone that served should be remembered in a manner with a shadow box, but then, that is just my opinion. Glass and windows/flash lighting makes photographing a bit difficult...but you can get the general layout.
    4 points
  10. Well to be fair, the owners manual would explain to not drink the battery acid ..... assuming it is a modern manual.
    4 points
  11. 6 mil plastic sheeting and butyl sealant tape is how the factory did for many years. Use your cards as a pattern to cut the sheeting, slightly smaller ouside dimensions, and the butyl tape to hold the sheeting to inner door.
    4 points
  12. Conn47D24

    HOME Stretch

    Home from the Upholstery shop. Very please with the workmanship. Now back to assembly.
    4 points
  13. I go down to Home Depot and buy storage totes and then all the parts going to Ziploc bags that are labeled and I use three different size bags sandwich quart and gallon. Then the parts going to the appropriately labeled tote and they sit on the Shelf till I'm ready for them
    3 points
  14. Dodgeb4ya

    New oil pump seized

    I have only replaced one flathead oil pump with a new one once...just because years ago. (70's) I have always taken them apart and measured the clearances/ checked for any scoring etc. on my flathead rebuilds...oil pressure always has been cold 45-50...hot high rpm 45...hot idle 30-40. Engine rebuilds are complete with all measurements taken after machine shop work to double check and extreme cleanliness a must. Modern engines always have done new pumps. No new flathead pumps for me unless engine had a catastrofic bearing or piston failure. Jmo.
    3 points
  15. Dodgeb4ya

    New oil pump seized

    I use this now days to be sure of good pre-lubing a new or sitting engine...
    3 points
  16. I suspect that my email address was hacked. I had to change my pasword tonight. If you get a wierd email from Desoto1939@aol.com please delete the email. Sorry and Thank you, Rich Hartung
    3 points
  17. Never mind. I just found them! I'm Guilty with an explanation. I had painted my throttle linkage silver to go with the engine. But after seeing Bob's pic, I'm thinking it's supposed to be black. The whole linkage assembly was hanging over the silver bell housing, so I couldn't see it. Very relieved to find these essential parts that would have been very hard to find. Marc.
    3 points
  18. UPDATE …… After pulling the bell housing lower cover I can easily see now that the throw out bearing came off its seat on the clutch fork. So the pressure plate forks are fine it is the throw out bearing out of place and amount of throw was not enough to move the forks. There are the 2 spring clips that help hold the fork ends to mating surface on the t.o bearing and when I was installing the gear box those clips were problematic. I loosened all the linkage and can manipulate the fork into position and I can get it all back into place with some bent pliers and some bad words thrown in. Whewww
    3 points
  19. Just be glad you can buy a water pump..............
    3 points
  20. As much as I hate metric bolts I still have a metric tap & die set as well as an Imperial/SAE tap & die set.......the metric set is kept far away from the proper set so as not to pollute the SAE one......any metric bolts or nuts that are found in the garage are quickly disposed of in the garbage bin............a thread gauge is also a good tool to have handy ...........what are those things at the end of your legs?........metres or feet?........I rest my case...........andyd
    3 points
  21. Getting under the dash is not a big problem. Just kind of fall into place. Getting back out is the hard part. I make sure my phone is where I can get to it in case I need to call someone to grab my feet and pull me out.
    3 points
  22. If they are in a water environment you have a problem........ 😉
    3 points
  23. "I swear this Plymouth is going to be the cause of me drinking…." Maybe you should have started drinking BEFORE working on it..........
    3 points
  24. I had four lock ring wheels sand blasted. I washed any residue off and brush primed and painted them satin black. I like to use 7.50R16LT tires, they are taller than 215/85R16’s. I use tubes with a TR150 valve stem that you bend after putting the tires on. I like to keep the wheel dry so I wipe the bead and wheel with rubber lubricant. I got four 8.5x17.5” wheels that could be assembled tubeless, but I would need to buy tires and they would still be a shorter height. I’m going to wipe the tubes with corn starch when I assemble them. I had a flat this summer on another truck and the tire dismounted easily and the wheel was still clean. There was a short piece of cellophane type tape inside the tire that rubbed a pinhole in the tube, another reason to use corn starch or talc. Rick D.
    3 points
  25. Glad it helped you @OUTFXD. Re MoparPro: “Never” is not quite long enough. That guy…If I ever meet him at a show like Hershey, I’ll be known among the Mopar community for alot more than my silly little YT channel.
    3 points
  26. They do exist. Mine is home made but here's a picture of a commercially made one.
    3 points
  27. https://macsmotorcitygarage.com/the-ford-motor-companys-forgotten-49-fastbacks/
    3 points
  28. Just some food for thought. Here is how I tackled the amp gauge conundrum when I switched to a 70a alternator and I kept my stock gauges. I bought an aftermarket mini volt gauge. Here you can see it sitting next to my amp gauge. I removed the amp gauge and attached the volt gauge in its place. I glued the stock needle to the volt meter's needle and added a little color (optional). In the end, when the needle is straight down, that's 12v, anywhere to the left is charging. If it were not for the colors, nobody would know.
    3 points
  29. LeRoy

    Ride in the hills

    It's a great day for a drive in the hills.
    3 points
  30. keithb7

    Rip Van Spitfire

    I’d get an engine stand. Roll it over. Take off the pan. Have a look. Any rust from condensation? Remove oil pump. Pack it with 105 engine grease. If there is cylinder wall rust, I’d consider a hone. Lube up rings and reinstall. Add assembly engine bearing lube to all bearings. Cam lobes and tappets. Lube up front and rear seals before cranking it over. Reinstall oil pan. Fresh engine oil. Tie-in an oil pressure gauge. Monitor pressure while cranking it over. As per my start up video. Once you have oil pressure give ‘er and start it up. Thats just what I’d do. The oil that they used to assemble that engine is gone. Or completely deteriorated. An ill prepared start could do a lot of damage to it.
    3 points
  31. Doug&Deb

    Ride in the hills

    That last picture could have been an ad back in the day. Beautiful car and beautiful scenery.
    3 points
  32. Does it count as a barn find if it comes from my own shed? My ‘53 B4B is done, our ‘67 Barracuda ‘Vert goes in for a top and interior, so I now have room in my big shed to start on my late FIL’s ‘54 Chevy 150 wagon. My FIL bought the car in ‘69 for $295. It was his favorite car to drive. Now, every member of the family wants to see it in all its glory once again after its 25yr barn-nap. And before anyone asks, it will be painted- no one in the family is a fan of the patina. it’s a 235, Blue Flame, 3 on the tree - original drivetrain (and it’s staying). No big dents, only light surface rust in the cracks of the crappy paint job, AND NO MICE! However, when pressure washing I probably made 500+ mud daubers homeless. And the forum is not letting me add a photo. Will try that separately.
    2 points
  33. I have too imagine finding carb parts on the shelf these days is getting rare. Not that I have looked recently.
    2 points
  34. Another thing to remember when working on bearings. Keep it clean - no grit allowed. While growing up I had a friend that always complained about wheel bearings going bad. I was at his house one day when he was working on the front brakes. When he took the drum off he laid the outer bearing on the ground - in the dirt. Mystery solved.
    2 points
  35. My parts list from Dec 2020. Most of it. Not all. All from Vintage Power Wagons. I see they have increased a bit. But not much. $235 today for a set. I have no complaints. Engine is running great.
    2 points
  36. OUTFXD

    Carb upgrade

    Beware "universal" repalcements. Many are made outside the USA. This often means Poor production quality, inferior materials, and metric fasteners/threads. (note that I dont have an issue with Metric Fasteners or threads, But when its on a vintage American car, needing a completely different tool set that only works on the carb...)
    2 points
  37. Found this video of a guy showing how to convert a Chevy 1 wire alternator to 6V positive ground. I converted mine over to 12V, but thought some might like this option in place of the generator.
    2 points
  38. Conn47D24

    HOME Stretch

    More assembly today. Dome light and switch. Rear 1/4 window garnishes. Also assist straps. Not standard on the club coupe, but I found these NOS at Hershey a few years ago. Then the chrome screw cover buttons at a vendor. Hardest was two tiny clips the sit under the screw head and hold the button in place. Mike at Obsolete ( old Mitchell's ) found them on a junker in his yard. Anyway, I love the look.
    2 points
  39. Ok, had to go look at my carb rebuild write up to refresh my memory. Float level too high, or a sunk float. 6th and 7th pictures will help you http://www.yourolddad.com/carb-rebuild
    2 points
  40. DJK

    Turn signal bulbs

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe the 6v flasher is only capable of operating so many bulbs at one time???!!!!
    2 points
  41. Young Ed

    Rip Van Spitfire

    The engine in my 46 pickup was originally in my dad's 51 Plymouth. It wiped the bearings at 127 miles from rebuild. They thought at the time it was due to not being cleaned enough. Part of me thinks though it was at least partially due to the amount of time(years) between when it was built and the actual start up. If I was buying that spit fire it wouldn't see an attempt at rolling over until I pulled it apart and relubed all the bearings.
    2 points
  42. keithb7

    Flathead 6 horse power

    To the original author: There is a formula to calculate your new displacement. Take your stock bore and add 0,040 to it. Google search the formula and work it out. There won’t be much HP gain. Maybe a very small amount. If you eat a big buffet dinner the car with a 0.040 over engine will accelerate about the same as stock. Lol.
    2 points
  43. Dodgeed

    Breakdowns

    Ha, wouldn't you know, after posting the above yesterday, TODAY, while attempting to start the '51 pickup in a remote garage, it wouldn't. So, I needed to drag out the tool kit to get the battery hold down off, which was difficult in the near dark, and remove the battery so I could walk to a nearby outlet to plug in my charger in yet another remote garage. I probably haven't used that particular tool kit in two or three years, but, after posting YESTERDAY, I did! Just figures.
    2 points
  44. 2 points
  45. SteveR

    230 ci horsepower?

    I think its funny when the boy racers here rev up their little 4 poppers with glass packs. They think they sound so tough until I rev up my 230 with a genuine 1960s glass pack. Ya I know they are a lot faster than me, but they don't know that and our Miss Daisy is 85 years old. The only way their car will reach 85 years is as a baked bean can. Lol
    2 points
  46. Dash mods for the Dakota Digitals.
    2 points
  47. put the crank in a plastic bag before you use spray foam, if you go that route.
    2 points
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