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  1. Pretty cool feeling after all that time, effort & money invested. I'd love to rebuild another engine soon , yet it's quite a pricey little hobby. All in, I estimate I spent about +/- $4500 USD to rebuild the engine myself, to stock condition. It was a 228 CI 1953 25”Canadian Dodge engine. I had it bored over to make it a stock 237 ci. The Desoto engine. The majority of my costs was the full machining. Oh and parts freight costs! Other than an align bore, everything else was machined. Crank, head, block/caps and con rods were re-used. Pretty much every other wearing part was new. New cam, tappets, guides, valves, springs, pistons & pins, piston bushings & clips, etc. I also had the generator rebuilt during the process. Water pump and new radiator rebuild were only about a year old so did not include these costs in the amount above. I gained a ton of experience and had a ton of fun. I was very pleased when the engine fired up immediately for the first time. It idled and ran well right from the first crank of the starter. My 1938 Plymouth has been a very fun and educational lab tool for me. I rebuilt my first transmission on it as well. Driving it between improvements and major repairs, has proven very rewarding and incentivizing. I recommend you give it some thought. Think about rebuilding your own engine. Of course you need clean dry shop space. Tools and some wits about you but it's not a difficult project. For those who follow me on You Tube, a video of the start up will be posted within a few days. Thanks to those who supported me here with my questions. This site has my back, so I feel a little more secure diving in to big projects. - Keith
    20 points
  2. RobertKB

    First Drive of 2022

    We’ve had some quite cold and snowy weather the last while. But I live in southern Alberta and we get the occasional break from Old Man Winter. This is usually the result of a Chinook which we’ve had the last four days. https://crownofthecontinent.net/entries/chinook-wind/5e27ff51-2b63-46b9-9c1f-068abda9be03 Today was 10C or 50F for those south of the border. It was great to get one of the old cars out!
    10 points
  3. I got my '33 Plymouth up to 70 MPH (per my cellphone GPS app) once. Took a long time and could not hold it on even a slight upgrade. Biggest thing I noticed was my talkative passenger went quiet.
    10 points
  4. Found her sitting in a barn since 1982, lots of mechanical work but the body was only soap & water and some new whitewalls.
    9 points
  5. Local vintage club had an article about a multi-purpose arena located in Copenhagen that was built in 1926. One of its many events was the annually car and motorcycle exhibition showing the latest wonders and innovations. These photos from 1934 show MoPar’s stand with presentation of the new Chrysler/DeSoto Airflow. Text comparing body uni-construction to Lillebæltsbroen, a newly build bridge. Check out General Motor Art Deco lettering in background. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to all.
    9 points
  6. Here is how it went down:
    8 points
  7. My car has the Mopar 100 series heater which has the pull knob dash control. I got the original heater valve with the car and was told it leaks. What the previous owner replaced the original with was a Ball Valve at the cylinder head. I like being under the hood but I don't care to "dismount" every time I want to change the cabin temperature. So...49 Plymouth heater valves are not on every venders shelf and if you found one it might be a little pricey. Generic valves seem to cover almost all cable controlled heaters. One that I've bought a lot of are the "in-line" type, which have a hose barb on each end. The cable on my heater was long enough for a valve mounted on the head and not much longer, so the in-line valve was out. To keep it a clean installation I found a 90 degree design with pipe threads on one end and a hose barb on the other. Once I got the valve I found it operates very nicely but... and you know there is always a "but".....the cable lever is "OFF" with the cable pulled out and "ON" with the cable pushed in. Not a deal breaker ( for at least 3 months of the year lol ) Next issue, it would sit very close to the head...if you could screw it in but...you can't because the firewall is too close. SO...You need a "Union" Now I know what you are thinking because I thought it too. "I don't want some "cobby" plumbing union under the hood of my car!" Besides just try and describe what a Union is to the average parts counter guy. Kids are smart nowadays and when you think they are looking for a part number they actually consulting Google for a photo of the thing they've never heard of. While standing at the counter I saw the sign that read "We make Hydraulic Hoses" So I asked do you have the fittings for those hoses? Yes most of them. What I ended up with is a 37 degree flare with a 3/8 pipe thread end (male) and a captive nut mating female with a 3/8 pipe thread end (female). It elevates the valve, allows you to position the valve exactly where it needs to go and best of all it is clean. Amazon delivers to my little hide-away free so I use them a lot. Additionally they have photos and descriptions that I value for generic items. The valve is a Four Seasons p/n 74682 $52.78 Spark Plug Wire removed for photo
    7 points
  8. sidevalvepete

    Local Rally

    1915 Dodge 1930 Chrysler 77 and 1929 DA Dodge
    7 points
  9. some pics of my most recent purchase....I call him "Parts"
    7 points
  10. I used to make a fair living correcting the same mistakes over and over from a big shop in town. Folks would have this shop replace their clutch but it would last only 10,000 miles and it would slip again. It seems that this shop had a policy of putting thin wave washers under the pressure plate on every clutch job they did. The reason was that they couldn’t always adjust the clutch afterwards and they never bothered to find out why. The cause was a worn out Clutch Fork that would not push the throw out bearing far enough to disengage the clutch or would actually bump the rotating pressure plate. The wave washers made the pressure plate fingers stick out further. However the clamping force of the pressure plate was compromised. I would remove a small plate from the top of the bell housing then turn the engine until a pressure plate bolt came into view. You had to loosen them in two stages then take the bolts out to let the wave washer fall out. 6 bolts, two turns of the engine to get the washers out then two turns to tighten the bolts. From then on the clutch life was normal. I would warn the customer that when they next needed a clutch that fork should be replaced. At the time they were about $23. My clutch jobs also included a rear motor mount if need, which was something nobody else even thought of looking at. The point is if the mechanic doesn’t know what they are doing, they take short cuts. If the repair lasts 90 days they are off the hook. With a old car you have to be very meticulous, do real failure analysis and be willing and able to take it apart again to get it right. Shops won’t do that. They think they can’t afford too. That’s why I do my own work.
    6 points
  11. 100% stock. I figured I did not want to mess with all those years of success on the engine. The engineers did pretty good!
    6 points
  12. jsd245

    1953 B4-GA has arrived

    So, I got her home! Truck is solid, rust here and there but not a total rust bucket. Frame is 100%. the story is it spent it’s entire life on a cranberry farm in Massachusetts . Odometer says around 26,000 miles. I guess I have to assume it’s 126,000 but I’m not so sure given how it was used. Maybe it’s only 26,000? Last transfer Station sticker on it was 2014 so it was probably on the road then. Guy I got it from bought it in 2016 but never moved forward with the project he had planned for it. He actually posted a couple times on here. It had a dump body on it, but I want to put a stake side flatbed on it so I didn’t take it. I kept all the dump mechanism, maybe will make it a dump flatbed. I actually got it fired up today- but it’s not running great and is blowing air and fuel out of the carb. Zero compression on two cylinders so my assumption is sticking Intake valves. Stay tuned!
    6 points
  13. My uncle used to own a 48 Chryser,and the top speed seemed to be about 20-25 MPH. I used to sometimes catch a ride to the nearest grocery store (about 20 miles one way),and at times was tempted to just get out and walk. Seemed like that was the top speed of everything he owned.
    6 points
  14. Kilgore47

    Old Carbs

    I have been rebuilding carburetors most of my life. Started when I was about 12 (68 now). Dad told me I could have the old lawn mower and I was determined to make it run again. Got it to run. So I'm the carb guy in our group of car people. The latest one to show up is a 1405 Edelbrock 600cfm four bbl. This has been one of the easiest I've have worked on in a while. It was fairly clean inside. It is on a 1964 Impala SS. The carb I worked on before the Edelbrock was off a 1969 Cutlass. A Rochester 2bbl. That thing looked like it had lived in a swamp for a couple of years. It was in the trunk when he got the car and the trunk leaked so it sat in water for a while. Took three days but I got that Rochester cleaned up and working. I use an old cookie sheet so parts don't roll away. A picture of the Edelbrock after cleaning and a picture of the Rochester before and after cleaning are attached. Just can't resist trying to save old car parts.
    5 points
  15. Ok... Door Vin Plate "B-4-TA 190"... B= B series Truck 4= year (1953) T= 3 Ton Rating A= 2 Speed Rear Axle (Timkin Double Reduction) 190= 190" WB As for the "T" series trucks they originally came with the 331ci T322 engine.....3-3/4" bore X 5" stroke. Your fire engine truck has a T324-3337 engine. That T324...engine is a designated 4 ton truck engine that first came out in 1951 and was used through 1953. The T324...engine was used in the biggest of the Dodge truck line "Y" series trucks. But now...Gets a little sticky. That T324..engine from 1951 thru 1952 is a 377ci. 4" bore X 5" stroke. The T324.. engine starting in 1953 had a bore and stroke increase to make it a 413ci. 4-1/16" bore X 5-5/16" stroke. The only easy way to see which T324.. engine is in the fire engine (377 or 413) And how to do that is to remove the 7/16" hex plug over #6 cylinder and measure the piston stroke using a straight piece of say 1/8" steel rod. Remove the hex plug...set 10"-12" rod down hole to piston top. Remove all spark plugs so the engine will turn over easily by turning the fan (fan belts need to be tight) or use thumb to keep belt tension while turning fan. Measure the total up/down rod travel while rotating the engine using the fan. 5" is a 377ci. 5-5/16" is a 413ci. That engine will run just fine... The Moly Block engines are serious heavy duty engines. Change the oil and filter. Clean and rebuild the Ball and Ball carbs....easy to get the carb kits... Could be E7U1 or 2 E9G1.. NAPA/O'Reilly's even has the kits..I just bought two kits for a 413 I did carbs on. Points, condensor.... All I will say don't buy new from a parts store...Chinese junk. I would just to get it up and running carefully clean the existing points..set to .020" check the cap and rotor...it will fire right up. Fuel pump and tank will be a problem...get the pump rebuilt with a ethanol resistant diaphram etc. Gad tank....well look at it clean it...do what it needs to be real clean and rust free. There is plenty more to get caught up on needed maintenance....let others offer up on that. Looks like that truck has hydraulics with the double bladder brake booster...didn't see a air compressor. That's another story there! Good to see the engine given new life!
    5 points
  16. This is my '41 Plymouth that I've had since about 1969. My father got it in a trade for a mid '50's Chevy truck on it's way to the junk yard. It yard drove at the time but was nowhere near road worthy. I started working on it in the mid '70's but with kids coming along and work (construction) it kept getting pushed a little deeper into the "I'll get around to it" file. Retired now and moved into our new home it's time to get this project moving again. Bodywork guy's coming so I put the sheet metal together for fit and to give him an idea how it all goes together. Thanks for looking and being a carpenter by trade I'm gaining a lot of knowledge and information from this forum. Jeff
    5 points
  17. The old Ford p/u has been frustrating me by depositing coolant in the crank case. So I didn’t have it available to collect a downed mesquite tree a few miles from home. I forced my coupe to earn it’s keep this past weekend. Just couldn’t let all that nice wood be picked up by someone else. Anyone else make their vintage vehicle do hard labor?
    5 points
  18. Morning y'all. So our volunteer fire company is looking to restore our old 1953 Dodge Bruco Fire Engine. Vehicle plate says B-4TA-190, 152HP at 2900rpms, 171HP at 3200rpms. The engine block is stamped with T324-3337, the plate that should be on the manifold side is missing. My research of the engine stamp points me that it's a 377ci engine, correct? Tho I thought these came originally with a 331ci or 413ci. My only real question currently is what direction do I search for parts? Most sites focus on the smaller engine blocks. We haven't fired this engine up yet, still cleaning and inspecting everything. What engine parts were universal across the small to large block flatheads? I have attempted to use the search function but it doesn't seem to wanna pull up 377 by itself. I'll have to do some deep browsing thru the forum when I get a chance. Thank you.
    4 points
  19. Found a shop called the heitman company that does clutches, brakes and resurfaces pressure plates and fly wheels. Had the clutch and pressure plate redone at half the cost of online pricing and they turned it around in 1 day. So far the workmanship looks like a quality job. I'll know for sure in a few weeks once it's all back together i guess.
    4 points
  20. Ulu

    Dad’s Old Scout

    Dad bought this Scout new in 1963, up in Moses Lake Wa. When it rotted out we put a 1967 body on it that came from Phoenix. I have a lot of history with this old Scout. I rode all over America (west of the Mississippi) in the tiny back seat. I helped my dad swap the engine and swap the body too. I sandblasted the whole frame and re-painted it for him. I first drove stick, in this Scout, in 1970. I remember my dad told me not to ride the clutch! It came to me when my dad passed in 2002, but it hasn’t been driven at all since 1985. The engine was frozen when I got it. Badfroze. Hammertime. When I first opened the hood in 2002 it was packed full of leaves and possum poop. It took me hours with a stick & the hose to wash it all out (There is surely still some inside the heater.) There was a dead rat in the car, so . . . Yuck. I closed the hood and paid a guy to tow it to my house in late December of 2002 weeks after we put dad to rest out in the pioneer cemetery. (Dad got a 21 gun salute. Thank you Lord for that.) The tarp was rotting off from sun. I finished the job today. It has been 20 long years since I even opened the hood. I think it’s time. Time to . . . O M G . . . look inside. Plenty of Severe possum pee corrosion evidence. No damage to the stainless steel cable from the possums. I’m the one who fouled it. Well I’m not gonna get this cleaned up before dinner.
    4 points
  21. Interesting question! First, I've worked in the software industry since the early 1980s, (yes last century) My personal opinion is Facebook has the worse user interface I have ever seen and for something like a question/answer forum it is worthless. That's why I license a commercial forum software. I think the trend of many sites to move to Facebook is financial because it is basically "free". No license fees, hosting fees, security certificates etc. But the experience basically sucks. From an admin point of view the forum software in way ahead of what I can do on a social media platform. I have a p15-d24 Facebook account, primarily so members can use those credentials for registration and login if they want. Really haven't focused much on posting on Facebook just do to time constraints. At some point I will look at making it more active, primarily as a"recruiting" activity back to this site.
    4 points
  22. Hello friends, This is my build thread for my 1948 Chrysler Windsor. I've had several ad-hoc threads, but no cohesive thread as Elise (not to be confused with my 1950 B2B also named Elise). This build thread is special - as my son and I (and the rest of family) have entered into the 2022 Great Race with Elise. We are VERY excited, and I am excited to get Elise into proper shape for the rally race. There are many things on my list of to-do items, and I would like to share my preparation journey with you all, and also document the race. This is a really special event for my three boys and myself to participate. I particularly enjoy the process as well as teaching them how the vehicle works, and learning myself as I go. Most of my preparation has to happen over the next 6 weeks, but on my near term list of to do items include: 1. Rebuild Carburetor 2. Install Alternator 3. Fix frayed wiring 4. Tune up (points, cap, rotor, timing, wires) 5. Electric fan 6. new tires (balance/align) 7. Brakes - adjust 8. Change oils 9. Race Speedometer 10. 7 wire turn signals (rewire turns for brake+turn and flashers) 11. Miscellaneous survival requirements for race 12. Optima battery 13. Figure out how to get to RI and Back from ND cheaply 14. Practice runs (50, 100, 500 miles) 15. 200 mile tank minimum Elise is overall in very good shape, and generally has been driven lightly over the last 24 years (3 thousand miles). Well maintained, and has always run well, but this race will double the total miles.
    4 points
  23. We have a MATCH The painter took one of my green panels to the paint store and the owner spent some time mixing and matching and low and behold I now have paint to perform a respray that should look pretty good. The new paint is dabbed on just above the small dent in the center of the picture. The dab is about the size of a finger tip. It's a close enough match that I couldn't find it when I was given the panel and told to find it! I ended up buying a gallon plus two spray cans filled with the paint for future use. Is it going to be a perfect match? Probably not but it sure looks close enough that I don't think I'll have anything to complain about. Jim, thanks for the assistance in being able to move forward with this task
    4 points
  24. Yes. I do feel pretty darn swell. Its not often in life that most of us get to rebuild an engine. I was about 18 the last time I rebuilt a car engine. I did other engines, dirt-bikes, seadoos etc, but no cars in the past 32 years. My work on this engine is far from proven yet. It needs to actually drive and make good power and torque under load! Then how long will it actually last? Could take decades before my work is proven. Lol. I pulled my engine late Nov 2021. So it me about 13 months to get the project done. Took my time. Enjoyed life along the way. @Dodgeb4yaThanks for your kind comments on my Mopar related videos. @Polsonator2This is a big reason I make these videos. To encourage others to do their own work. Teach others too. I enjoy it.
    4 points
  25. Unless it is an old tired engine full of gunk there is no reason to use non detergent oil. Detergent oils came out in the early 50s, contrary to a lot of the common folklore you hear. Your motor has most likely been using detergent oil since the 50s for sure. This non detergent oil thing is a complete myth handed down by people who swore on it because their grandpa or dad did because of some hearsay bs legend. Most cars by the mid to late 50s have been using detergent oil from then until now or the day the car died. If the car has sat in a barn or field since before the 50s then maybe.. Go to the 11:20 mark of this 1953 Chrysler Master Tech video for proof (they also highly recommend it for "hard driving", straight from Tech's own mouth): Personally I use 5w 40 rotella instead of 15w 40. And not because of the zinc, which I also believe is not necessary in a mopar flathead. I do it because it gives me light weight cold starting like a 10w 30 and get the benefit of the 40 weight at high speed driving. My rod clearances in my rebuilt 230 motor are .002 and mains are .0015. If you are running factory clearances of .0005 to .0015 I would go with 10w 30. If it gets thin when hot after a freeway run move to the 5w 40 rotella(unless you have leaks because its pricey). If leaks try 10w 40. If still thin when hot after a 10w 40 go 15w 40. I only used 20w 50 after I spun a rod bearing and did a shade tree rebuild to get my previous motor back on the road. It helped keep pressure up for another 10k miles or so but ultimately the bearings kept wearing out due to the crank not being taken out and reground. Now that I have a fresh rebuilt motor with polished fresh crank, I go for the lightest oil I can that does not thin out after a half hour freeway run. If you are not spinning continually at 2800+ rpms like I am on the freeway I would again recommend 10w 30. One last thing, no need to use a straight 30w oil either... see Sniper's earlier post in this thread that shows how 10w 30 was also recommended in the mid 50's manual once it was available. Very likely that most mopar flatheads ran from the mid 50's to now or when they died were also using multi viscosity oil...
    4 points
  26. Here’s mine, faded 1970’s paint, pulled off a chunk and waxed the heck out of it for the match, had them add a little flattener to it to knock down the gloss, it’s still glossy of course but you just have to scuff it a little to match, you can see the rear fender is repainted, waiting to be scuffed up. Again the matching process works for any paint new or old and can be properly executed with time by a skilled professional
    4 points
  27. A bit closer
    4 points
  28. Ernie Baily

    Santa Arrives

    This is when I drove Santa to a local Location! Santa Drive 2021(1).mp4
    4 points
  29. It doesn’t matter what brand you buy. You’re not gonna make money without a whole lotta labor that you’re not getting paid for. If you love old cars build an old car. If you’re interested in making money open liquor store.
    4 points
  30. The value is what someone is willing to pay and what the seller is willing to let it go for. Just looking at the pictures I would not pay more than $2K but would try to get it for somewhere around $1200 (or less). Take a look at a Hemmings pricing guide. You can easily pour a lot of money into these cars trying to get them back to their original state. But I guess it is a labor of love. If you are looking to fix it up to enjoy ... go for it. If you are looking up to fix it up and flip it ... you will probably lose your shirt. These old MOPARs don't command the same value as Ford, Chevy, or other GM platforms. If you like it ... buy it, fix it, drive it, enjoy it. $15K can easily disappear working on a car like this ... especially if you have to source out some of the work.
    4 points
  31. DJK

    Merry Christmas

    Merry Christmas everyone
    4 points
  32. Last night before a test run. A few laps around town tonight.going to be fun!
    4 points
  33. Another "my uncle" (same one) true story related to how slow he drove,and this time it was in a mid-50's 1/2 ton Dodge pu. The ONLY new vehicle he ever bought in his entire life. His son,my cousin, had enlisted in the army,and was a member of the 101st Airborne Division when he decided he didn't want to be in the army anymore,so he just came home. His mother and father finally talked him into going back to Ky to face his charges,so they all piled in the cab of that pu,and left northeastern NC for Ft. Campbell,Ky. It needs to be said that although my aunt was a tiny woman, Uncle George was around 6'8'' tall,and his son "Mackey" was about the same size,so you KNOW that was a fun trip in the cab of that little truck at 35 mph. Anyhow,they got to the main gate at Ft.Campbell,Mackey surrendered to the MP's,and they watche him getting hauled off to the stockage in handcuffs before turning around to dive back home to NC. Imagine their surprise when they finally got home and discovered Mackey sitting in their living room watching tv. This time they didn't have to go anywhere. The army sent some MP's to pick him up. I once watched Uncle George pick up a flat 6 mopar engine complete to the bellhousing,and sit it in the bed of that pu. Didn't even grunt. He just reached down,picked it up,and set it in the bed. He was in his 60's,then. When he was in his 70's,I went up to "the ditch" were all the commercial fishermen kept their work boats,to pump out my fathers boat after a big rain storm,and uncle George was taking the 6 cylinder Falcoln engine out of his boat because it had thrown a rod. The ditch bank was probably 3 feet higher than the top of the 22 foot skiff,so I asked him if he needed any help. He said."Nope,I think I got it.",and just reached down and picked it up and threw it up on the bank. His hands were so big he could palm a basketball. Nobody ever saw him get mad,but then again,most people had better sense than to mess with anyone that large. Also,if he ever took a drink of alcohol,I never talked with anyone who witnessed it,and my father knew him when they were both boys. His first job was as a cabin boy at age 13 on a 3 masted sailing ship that traded with China. He ran away from home to get the job. He was gone for around 20 years before coming back home to live. My very first job was as the only deck hand on the 38 foot shimp boat he build. Never worked that hard on any other job I ever had,but I made pretty good money for a punk 13 year old school child. I was never again temped to work on a shrimp boat,either. After that I wroked construction jobs as a helper ashore while I was still in school.
    4 points
  34. Love it here! Learning from others and passing along info is fun. I like the questions asked. Makes me think....Hmm. What is the solution to this problem? Like a daily pop quiz on old Mopars! It is stimulating and keeps the fire burning for the old Mopars. Some people do crossword puzzles every day. Some of us come here to see if we can answer the latest dilemma.
    4 points
  35. Furylee2

    Last Run of 2021?

    Cloudy but in the 50’s today. Decided to convert my florescent bulbs in my garage to LED’s. Had to move the 41, so I just had to take it for a cruise.
    4 points
  36. This is my all orginal 51 b3b. The wife has named her Dottie. She doesnt run yet but she will be my winter project this year that was postponed last winter.
    4 points
  37. sidevalvepete

    Local Rally

    The last few days has seen the region where I live host a vintage car rally. It is a bit more of a big deal than just a rally really but probably pales in comparison to many other overseas events. It is an international rally that is open to entrants from around the world. First held in 1966 and I think at 5 yearly intervals since. People have shipped their vehicles from around the world to join the rally for the 5 - 7 days and then stay on and do the tourist thing for weeks or months after, often hosted by fellow car buffs around the country. Some just come without their cars and drive borrowed vehicles from local enthusiasts. Lifetime friendships are made at events like this. Covid postponed the event last year and has also largely removed the overseas entrants through border closures etc. Therefore it is largely an Enzed affair this year, hosted by the local vintage car club. I think between 400 - 500 vehicles participated, all marques, from very early 20th century to the "modern" vintage vehicles. Most of the cars spent a few hours parked up on display to the public in my local town yesterday. Below are a few photos of the mopar related rides. I have stuck to etiquette. Non mopar are in the Other Topics forum. There were way morevehiclesthan what I've posted. I had hoped to participate myself but things have slowed somewhat in my build and it's not finished. Had a few health problems and doing some chemo for a few months. Not terminal yet ( well we all are really aren't we? ) so aiming for more time on the farm and the tools yet. Thoroughly enjoyed looking at the cars but was worn out and didn't have the puff to take more pics than what you see here and in the Other Topics page. Hope you enjoy....some cool cars...39 DeSoto 29 Chrysler 27 Chrysler 38 Chrysler 30 Chrysler 7737 Dodge Coupe 29 DB Dodge Coupe 38 DeSoto57 Chrysler Royal23 Dodge
    3 points
  38. Here’s a pic of the truck’s condition
    3 points
  39. Looks like Monarch-McLaren LTD has the leather cup seal in the right size and have a specific impregnated treatment for this type of service, 41.00 ea and I need 4. These seals are like the ones in a Hudson sprayer, they contract on the low pressure side with the resulting low drag, and they puff up on the pressure side to form a good air seal, Then vise versa when the action is reversed. Im going to send them one of my old ones so they have the real deal to compare and replicate. The lead time is 4 weeks so won't have any progress till them, but lots of other work to be done. Thanks so much for all the helpful responses. Some pics and a finished result i'm aiming for.
    3 points
  40. SSGRHYMER

    SSGRhymer

    Well, after a long break and re-attacking the noise. I replaced everything from the Pilot bushing clutch, and transmission. All new and looks good. Took a drive and the ticking was back. I had a qualified Mechanic tell me it was a gear rattling somewhere and not the engine. Thank goodness. I finally decided to pull the 6V starter ( was kind of old rebuild). when I took it out. The bearing was shot and the entire insides were loose and slopping around. Even if you held the arm. I had checked this earlier when looking to see if the gear was contacting flywheel. It was not, and the truck started fine. My truck is 12V so I put a NOS rebuilt 12V starter with return spring on the arm. Noise was gone. Unbelievable!!!!! The 6V Starter was KAPUT. It would start making the noise at a certain RPM and we figured that the bearing and internal parts were so worn, they were rattling at certain RPMs. I can say I fell more confident now that I know the truck intimately and learned a lot. Thanks everyone for all your assistance and advice. Problem fixed. The transmission needed replacing anyway. It was leaking from everywhere. So was well worth it. Hope everyone has a Safe, Healthy New Year.
    3 points
  41. Hi All, I have my spare three speed with overdrive all torn down and am starting to get in the replacement parts. I took some photos of all the parts. In the event that anyone would like some reference photos, I decided to post them. The painted case is the one I cracked 15 years ago. It could be welded, but I found a NOS one to use. If anyone has a OD Planet assembly with stripped out gears I would love to get it and see if I can get the shield off nice and if one can get the pinions out of it. If a method can be found to do this then going to some gear makers may we worth the effort to be able to rebuild the pinion (planet) units. James
    3 points
  42. I'll warm up the popcorn popper...... 😆
    3 points
  43. there are four adjustments, at least on my 51.
    3 points
  44. Let me be clear, my experience is with household plumbing & in a different life, I was a off road tire repair guy and set up a shop to repair tires. I am talking about a boiler and a steam chamber to fit large tires inside .... we need heat, vacuum & air pressure to vulcanize rubber. And a whole lot of water plumbing to operate a boiler. I used pipe dope. I never thought about using thread tape on a boiler. Now later in my second life, I was a remodel carpenter and did way more plumbing then a carpenter should have. Under the house, Galvanized plumbing, copper fittings, whatever ... I am using pipe dope and lots of it. I do not want to go back and fix a leak. Now retired and in my 3rd life, I am no mechanic but learning. I can not say I have been using blah blah blah on head bolts for this many years blah blah blah. Imagine if you will, the block is drilled & tapped for head bolts when new. Then head bolts are created and they work fine together. The tools wear out. These part most likely were created in different shops. But as the tool wears the pitch of the thread will slightly change and open up. So we end up with a issue where the bolts leak. I think I could use 10 miles of pipe tape to stop one from leaking. To me pipe dope is the appropriate answer to fix head bolts. The threads simply do not match because of tools, use, age. Pipe dope is the shitz for loose threads. What I have on the shelf, not saying one brand is better ... just what I bought local.
    3 points
  45. This is my 65 Schwinn.
    3 points
  46. T120

    Merry Christmas

    Merry Christmas to all ! 😊
    3 points
  47. I needed some building supplies and my daily pickup was full of work related things, so the Ol’ Dodge went to work for me.
    3 points
  48. billrigsby

    Found this on Ebay

    Found a copy of a booklet I have never seen before. In all my searching and buying Dodge B Series literature, never came across one of these. Wonder if anyone has seen this before? Did a search and found an old post on the AACA forum selling a 1934 version from 2006, and some 60's copys floating around. $15.00, never written in, very good condition! 32 pages, small ink stain on the cover spine. A quick scanned copy will be in the download section.
    3 points
  49. I deleted 250 photos tonight. I guess I had about 950 photos. I am now at 75% capacity. I get it that web sites can't offer unlimited data. I don't feel special or self entitled to have more data. I just enjoy contributing to this site. Many good people here. @P15-D24 I do like the idea of active members who have good credibility able earn to more storage data. Why let a few bad-apple kill the plan? I suggest you carry on. People do have to adjust to changes. We don't like to, but we will.
    3 points
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