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  1. Tired iron

    It's my day!

    So I haveta tell you all about this cause my wife doesn't seem to be as excited as me... As some of you may remember, the 3 speed transmission in my meadowbrook im restoring is totally shot. Was full of water, instead of oil, for years. Needle rollers brinneled most wear surfaces. 1st and reverse have major tooth loss. So bad....never seen a transmission this bad. A friend remarked that he thought he knew where one might be, but wasnt sure if it was even the right model. I gave him a hundred bucks and asked him to grab it next time he was in that town. I figured it was worth the gamble. Well, yesterday he showed up at my place with the transmission. I could see right away that it was a the correct 3 speed. But, I didnt recognize what was going on with the weird extension in the rear of it. I got out a wire brush and cut thru the gunk and lookie what I saw (see pic below) A R10 G-1 model overdrive! So I not only got a parts source for my old gear box (forget that!) I've got a transmission with overdrive and it looks to be in pretty good shape. I'll know more tomorrow when I open it up. I will have to swap input shafts, tho, I can tell already. Sometimes you do get lucky
    16 points
  2. Got the 47 DeSoto out for the 1st time this year . Washed off the garage dust and took my son for a couple mile drive to make sure it still has good manners. I started it multiple times over the winter to keep it happy . All went well so after a little this and that my wife and I enjoyed a ride to our local dairy bar for ice cream . Wouldn’t you know someone else with a cool old 1950 Dodge Coronet had the same idea.
    12 points
  3. Thought I would share a few photos of my recently restored 1951 half ton. The work took twenty some years to plan and two years to complete. While the job was in progress, I discovered this web site and asked a few questions on your forum and received plenty of feedback, which was very much appreciated. I have to thank the master mechanic (and friend) that did the work and tolerated my presence. I learned a lot in the process ! I've just received the safety check certification. The truck is now licensed for the road and will be used as a daily driver, so long as it doesn't rain, snow, blow debris, dark clouds, traffic . . . . . . 😉 Thanks again for your enthusiastic help on the forum fellows. Terry Original L shape, 218 cu. in. engine. Three speed (on the tree). Electrical converted to 12 volt negative ground, with 12 volt alternator. Added front wheel disc brakes. added seat belts.
    10 points
  4. A Axe throwing joint in Sacramento, Ca... 48D
    9 points
  5. We've just picked this up this morning, very new territory for us so i hope the forum members are patient enough to answer some future dumb qestions from the wrong side of the pond 😬
    9 points
  6. knuckleharley

    Rusty Wheel Cylinder

    Well,I am still trying to recover my short-term memory,and not having much luck. On a positive side,after being diagnosed as being terminal after maxing out on chemo and the other drug that I can't remember,the doc asked me if I wanted to try an experimental drug that hadn't been approved by the FDA yet,but was so promising the FDA was allowing it to be sold as long as it wasn't advertised as a "cure" for cancer. You take two pills,twice a day. The only downside was the doc told me some people got so violently sick from it,they told her they would rather die from cancer than take it anymore,and asked me if I want to try it anyhow. I said "Sure. What do I have to lose? If it makes me that sick,I'll just quit taking it." Here is where the chemo brain really worked for me. By the time it came in the mail,I had forgotten what it was for and that it might make me sick,so it didn't. In fact,I actually started feeling noticeably better within a week or so. I just ignored and enjoyed it without even thinking about the new meds. Took it for a couple of weeks before taking another PET Scan,and when I went to see the doc for a checkup,she didn't believe what she was seeing because it showed me to be cancer-free. So she sent me back for another PET Scan the next week,and that one came back cancer-free,also. I am now taking PET Scans once every 3 months instead of once a month,and every one has came back negative for cancer. The bad news is a bottle of 120 of these pills cost $13,400 at either Wal-Mart or Food Lion's Pharmacy,and another thousand bucks everywhere else. The good news is IF you are a veteran you can get it for free from the VA. I suspect,but don't know for sure,that if you go to a big cancer clinic like the one I went to,you can get the first bottle for free anyhow because the pill company needs people with cancer to test it so they can show the results to the FDA and then sell it as a cancer cure. If you have good health insurance,they might or might not pay for it. They might refuse using the excuse it isn't approved yet and is still experimental. If all else fails,I THINK you MIGHT be able to buy it at retail price if you can come up with the money without a prescription because it is being sold as a generic drug. And let's face it,if you are dying from lymphoma and can MAYBE cure it with one or two bottles,chances are you will figure out a way to come up with the money. I hope you and your loved ones never need this info,but PLEASE share it with anyone you know that does. AFAIK,which isn't very far,it is for Lymphoma, but I have a hard time believing it won't at least help with some other forms of cancer. BTW,for all I know,it might even quit working. The docs never declare anyone to be cancer-free until they have been without cancer for 5 straight years. Since I am 75 now,it seems unlikely I won't die of something else before the 5 years are up,but I am going to do the best I can. BTW,the manufacturer is a company named Brukinsa and the medicine is named Zanubrutinib and comes in capsules, Arthur
    8 points
  7. I've replaced the exhaust on my New Yorker, but before buttoning up everything, thought I'd listen to the sweet open exhaust. Kinda reminds me of an old Chris Craft...(which also used Chrysler 8's, among others). The slight rap/squeak sound is a failing water pump...also soon to be replaced. see video link below
    7 points
  8. We had been casually looking for a classic car for my wife to drive around. She's driven the Meadowbrook and doesn't feel comfortable with it. As much as I wanted it, another early Mopar was out of the question. I came across this 63 Corvair and pondered it a bit before I showed it to my wife. She was smitten. As a 16th wedding anniversary gift to her, we brought it home late January. I began going through the car, making it safe and reliable. Today, after a lot of hard work it came down from the jack stands and hit the road. We took it for a shakedown run and picked up our son from school. Then took it to town for pizza and ice cream. 67 miles clocked today. There are a few minor bugs to work out and some tuning to do yet. My wife is looking forward to a lot of miles with it this summer. Cruises, car shows, and general transportation. The car is more teal/aqua than it looks in the picture. No hubcaps in this pic because I left them off to make it easier to recheck lug torque and hub temps.
    6 points
  9. I love automobiles, always have. My view of what makes an "interesting" car is far different from most people. I spent a lot of my youth as a dealer mechanic, so my view is effected by that. My cars tend to be period correct within 5 years and are what a dealer mechanic would build for themselves. A dealer mechanic would put the best stuff from the MoPar parts book on their car, usually the lightest car with components from the bigger cars. That focuses on what was possible in the day. That I find entertaining. If I were doing an engine swap in my Plymouth it would be a 265 Chrysler flathead 6. (got one almost ready to go in my Suburban) Or if I really got kinky perhaps a Perkins Diesel as the factory did. (and only because the factory did and I happen to like diesel engines) It pains me greatly to hear folks doing "swaps" of well designed original components and in the process creating new problems for which they have no solutions. I've seen cars that could be driven and enjoyed laid up seemingly forever with projects that were well beyond the skills of the owners. It just seems to be a word to the wise that if it isn't broke don't fix it. Keep it simple. You'll get to enjoy more time with your car in motion. There is a certain "charm" to an old car. Seems a shame to change a car so much that it no longer has that charm. If one wants a car to perform like a Mercedes, perhaps they should buy a Mercedes. Sure seems like a lot less work. I mean just sayn'. A 49 Plymouth is never going to drive like a modern car or even a premium car of its era. That's what you sign up for when you get one. That's the charm of it. That's what I love about it. I want the best example of what it could have been back in its day. I want the car Lee Petty drove to work everyday. That's what seems like fun to me. Call me a purist, but do not call me an engineer, I don't qualify or pretend to.
    6 points
  10. soth122003

    When it rains it pours

    Well here we go. I have a leak on one of my freeze plugs (the hard one to get to, bottom aft under the oil filter). Now I've had this leak for years and it was a minor inconvenience. Leaked about 1 gallon of water every 2-3 weeks and only while parked and not driving. So being as I'm old and retired (read lazy and no initiative) and since I only use water in the radiator for coolant and the car runs at about 170 degrees all the time, never really had the gumption to fix it. Now I am sure a lot of you fine mopar fans out there like to watch our you tube star and movie mogul Keithb (yes Keith I blame you for the motivation), Well his last video was... you guessed it, changing a freeze plug. Now some of the worst things you will ever hear is 1. Son, Have I got a great job for you! 2. When the boss comes out and says "You know I've been thinking..." 3. When you watch a video and think, that doesn't look to hard. So yesterday I pull the oil filter. Move the plug wire holder out of the way. Drill out the freeze plug and pop it out and there was a wall of crap keeping it from leaking. The crud was damp but not letting water flow through. Gotta scribe and poked it through and whoosh out comes about 3 gallons of water. Got the hose, flushed it out and used a wire wheel to clean it up. Put the new freeze plug in with a little permatex to help seal it and used my air hammer to tap it into place. Now being that I used the hose and pick tool to flush and get rid of the crap that built up under the number six piston, I'm feeling pretty damn good about my self (YAY ME). Yeah Right, things can never be that simple. I fill the rad and engine with water and I go to check for leaks. And what to my wondering eyes did appear A LEAK!!! Under the freeze plug about 1/4" and 1" aft water was leaking. Not a lot but enough. Looking at the way the water ran down before the plug change it looked like the plug was leaking and running down about 1/4" and following the engine casting line along the block. NOOO. Wasn't that way at all, the block was cracked. So today, Monday, was spent running the engine up to temp (40 minutes) and using the block sealer to seal it from the inside (another 40 minutes) and the leak was reduced to a weep. Drained the water per instructions and jacked up the back end of the car to get the water clear of the cracked area. Tomorrow will be cleaning the cracked area and using JB weld (Since you can't weld cast iron) to seal it from the outside. The saving grace of all this is it is a minor problem and at least it is not a cracked block in the upper piston area. It also is not cracked into the oil galleys, both which would require an engine change. So Keith, from the bottom of my aching legs to the width of my sore back and top of my stiff and bruised shoulders, Thank you for motivating me to do a simple job that turned into a head ache. The bright side of all this is the weather here in Florida is warm and sunny and with a little introspection the job needed to be done anyway. So for all you mopar fans out there feel free to comment, make fun of, offer alternative suggestions I may or may not take, sympathize, or whatever to my tale of woe in the latest adventures of "MOPAR MADNESS". (Said with words echoing and thunder and lightning crashing). Joe Lee
    6 points
  11. belvedere

    new job?

    Thanks for all the replies...much appreciated! I ended up bargaining with one of the offers a little. After a lot of thinking, praying, and talking with my wife, I accepted it. I will start at a little over 70% of my current pay, which will be tough, but it will increase in steps, and after 9-12 months, I should be at about 90% of current. There is also some potential for growth in the future. It's a mom and pop...I think there's like 10 people working there, including the owner. I know one of the employees (worked with him at another job many years ago), and he loves it there, so that's encouraging. My current boss (who is a really good guy) was very understanding. I will start the new job in a month.
    5 points
  12. Sniper

    Electric Fan conversion

    Now for the numbers. Electrical - on low speed the fan draws 16.5 amps. On high speed the fan draws 22.5 amp, numbers bounced around some so it's a middle number. Once the engine hit 210 I jumpered out the switch and turned the low speed fan on. Once the low speed fan cooled as much as it could, probably after 10 minutes, I engaged the high speed to see how much farther down it would go. Ambient was 101 degrees when I measure the numbers with my Ratek IR gun. 185 degree (rated at fully open) thermostat. Low speed got the temps down to 167, high speed got it to 165 and that I believe is when the thermostat was fully shut. I did capture airflow numbers. Mechanical was done at idle speed, which is when airflow is at it's least. No shroud in the stock setup, small diameter 4 bladed solid mount fan. One final set of numbers, it got to 106 yesterday by the time I came in, today it got to 104. I lost 6 lbs, despite trying to stay hydrated. Only 50 more to go, lol.
    5 points
  13. stormy weather makes good pictures
    5 points
  14. Somewhere there is a Z car with a Plymouth 201 in it, lol.
    5 points
  15. I have driven the car a bunch in the last few days and the trans and OD are working fine. The sticking on 2nd gear happens sometimes and sometimes not. I do not think it is related to the oil as I am using 50W now versus 10W before. Heavy oil slows down the shafts sooner and usually improves the syncro action. It may be a linkage issue, but I suspect that it is a syncro that may have a burr that needs to wear in. It is not doing it on the other gears. The OD is shifting smoother then a modern automatic. Quite nice considering that the planet gear assembly is old and I could feel some wear in the non replaceable needle bearings. I am hoping that the new ring gear and sun gear will help lengthen the life of the old planet gear set. I am going to take the car to my place out of town later in the week. That is a 160 miles round trip at 65-70 MPH most of the way. We will see how she does. James
    5 points
  16. This morning I took the 1947 Desoto out for a drive to test the rebuilt transmission and the overdrive. It appears to be working as expected. I did notice a couple of things. One is that is it a little sticky going into gears. The other is that the shifting of the OD is even smoother than it was before the needle bearing failure in the old OD planet gear. I do have a very little drip in the gasket. I am not a fan of the Best Gasket Products. I am using SAE 50 weight motor oil in the transmission, I had been using SAE 10W motor oil. That may account for some of the stiffness in the shifting. We will see once I get 100 miles on it. The transmission is all but new. Every part in it, save a couple of minor items, are NOS. Same with the overdrive except the planet gear assembly. The OD has a NOS Sun Gear and a NOS Ring Gear. All the specifications as to tolerances are in the middle to low end of the specifications. Time will tell. When I took apart the trans to deal with the OD failure, I found an entire tooth missing from the second gear as well as most of one tooth on the reverse idle gear. Yet the transmission itself worked just fine and made no noise. Go figure. I have a second transmission with overdrive on the bench. I plan on assembling it in the next couple of weeks and crating it just in case I have a problem in the future. The drive shaft universal joints, the new manufacture ones, with the block cups are not real nice. The Universal shaft company that I have used (through three generations of the same family) also though they were crap. I plan on taking a bunch of old blocks (cups) and sleeving them so they can be used on an off the shelf good quality joint. I have a spare driveshaft (Two with center bearing for long wheelbase cars) and will rebuild it and put it into a crate as well. Do remember that we use the 1947 as out daily driver. I need to stock my own spares. The trouble I went through getting parts these past few months, as compared to 2006, is starkly different. The bearings that are not available or no longer made, the universal joints that are no longer made correctly in the USA, and on and on tell me we are at the tipping point I knew was coming. Parts are going to get exponentially harder to source from now on. Thanks to all who helped both on this forum and in direct communication. James
    5 points
  17. She's come a long way over the past few months, 15 or 20 minutes a day in my spare time , not the most professional job, but she's meant to be a cruiser not a museum car
    5 points
  18. Tons of positive feedback from the general public while out for a cruise last evening in my Plymouth. Interest from all ages. Again, I am pleasantly reminded how much the 20-something crowd reacts to the car. I am trying to understand why the loudest, and largest number of drive-by approvals seem to come from that age group. My '38 Plymouth has a different vibe going on. The paint is peeling off the doors. The side runners, the original rubber coating is worn away in chunks. There's a hole in the front fender. General wear and tear for an old car. I don't wash it nearly enough. I've never waxed it for fear of more paint falling off. I am not picky about its presentation. Yet a lot of people seem to approve it as is. I am left thinking, its approachable? Maybe it looks easy to own? It's been nursed along for 84 years, never restored. I guess folks just appreciate that about it. I don't know. It'll never win a best of show. It'l never play in the big boys club of restored cars. Yet it seems to win the the hearts and adoration of many, not just the owner's. You've all been aware of the work I have done to this car to built a solid, reliable daily driver. Indeed it is very reliable now. Any time I have to leave the house for any excuse, I choose my '38 Plymouth. From Mar to Nov, it sees regular use. I maybe went farther than I needed to when I pulled the engine in 2020 and completely rebuilt it. Sure it had some issues to be addressed. An in-frame rebuild probably could have nursed it along for many more years. Yet there is something extremely satisfying about the whole experience. So very smug feeling when you drive down that long hill and there is no oil seen when you accelerate away at the bottom. When you push the throttle down at 10 mph and that new found torque pulls the car along briskly. Smooth, quiet, and confidently. I guessed there must have been a couple 100 things that needed to be addressed when I acquired this old Plymouth. It turned out to be more like 1,000. No, it's not done. It's a continuous work in progress. It would be an odd feeling if it were all done. What would I do in the garage every weekend? Lol. I guess I can state that I am extremely satisfied with the results so far with this car. From the front nose cone to the exhaust tip, anything I've touched I've enjoyed every minute. This morning as I open the garage door, I have decided to devote time to my Chrysler. A little neglected so far this spring. Today is her day.
    5 points
  19. few more pics from last week (one similar, one new)
    4 points
  20. Bryan

    Don't leave tools out

    Someone might find them useful. Raccoon 2.mp4
    4 points
  21. Seems I switched my iwoytd to today, is 1:00 I have both fenders off, had to drill the heads of the bolts off, slow going .... in fairness drivers fender was off a long time ago and just hanging by a loose bolt to hold it in place. Time for a refreshment then going after the running boards .... should have them off today.
    4 points
  22. Before taking the body off the rotisserie repairs were needed to the boot floor sides, which needed access from below so I cut the floor out. The previous right side repairs did not meet the new floor so were rebuilt. The rusted section of the seat brace was also replaced The rusted edge next to the rear seat was rebuilt The left side was repaired Undercoated then lifted the body onto the chassis
    4 points
  23. Some of us have fancy modern V8 cars in the stable too.
    4 points
  24. I certainly don't have an issue with it. Buy it and have fun sharing your experiences with us!
    4 points
  25. finally got around to loading and delivering some of the hemlock logs to a friend with a portable mill. the first load was 4 8-footers, loaded across the dump body (for really easy unloading): next load is a pair of 10-footers ready for delivery:
    4 points
  26. I was browsing around looking for electrical stuff and found this: https://snap-usa.com/products/1950-1955-dodge-plymouth-mini-12-volt-starter-replaces-mch6101 If or when my 56 Plymouth starter on my truck dies this would be a great replacement. Lots lighter and smaller. Should be much easier for my old arms to put in place. More cranking power too and that neat (or not so neat, depending on your taste) reduction gear cranking sound. The original 56 pickup 12v is the foot stomp version so it is getting the Plymouth with a solenoid/bendix drive arrangement.
    4 points
  27. I've chopped a ton of wood, but I've never thrown axes before. I threw so many bullseyes, that they (wife and friends) stopped counting and started talking about me going pro....lol. Musta been the truck. 48D
    4 points
  28. keithb7

    When it rains it pours

    Somehow I feel partially responsible. Lol.
    4 points
  29. Plymouthy Adams

    new job?

    I second that retirement is the best job ever, being retired I stay as busy if not more so than when working. I look back and wonder how I juggled work, house, kids/school, yard maintenance and still got a bit of sleep each day and was still pretty much on top of all these tasks. I realized that I went to work, I also was able to rest up. Being retired the secret is staying busy but to never set a deadline as this now crosses the fine line of hobby/fun and places it into the WORK zone....
    3 points
  30. I decided to pass on the car. Just too much work! I still need to rebuild the '47 Desoto. I almost purchased a 1956 Windsor T&C this morning. She wanted $20K I offered $17.5K. The average of four price guides is $15K. A basic no deal. No counter. I am still hunting for a 1958 or 1959 Desoto 4 door hard top. The only ones I have found were over priced junk. James
    3 points
  31. Hey James, Over the years I was very content restoring and driving Plymouths: my P10 wagon, P9 Coupe, P22 Concord wagon, P28 Suburban, and then in June 2021, a Bay Area friend calls me and says that an old buddy of his has "an old Hemi wagon" that he needs to sell due to a move. I rented a Uhaul and drove 4 hours up to Arnold with very little info, only knowing that it had sat in the woods since 1981. Turns out it is an unmolested 1954 Chrysler T&C wagon with the 195 hp 331 cu in hemi and 74,000 original miles. I couldn't get the motor to rotate, but the rest of the wagon was in remarkable shape- virtually no rust, some deteriorated wood slats, but nothing that I couldn't fix. We agree on $800, with the caveat that if I could get the motor to turn over, I would send him an additional $200. (which I did.) Once I got it home, I really started to dig the styling, quality etc, and now my plan is for it to be my next resto (after the '52 Suburban I'm currently working on). THEN, a running and driving "54 Chrysler withe the 235hp hemi came up on Marketplace in a nearby town for a mere $1,800 (it's only money) which I snatched up, as it was the unloved, 4dr Deluxe, which meant it had the upgraded 235 hp hemi. (It's a sickness, I know!) My point in this rambling is you never know what's going to tickle your fancy and you should go for it, although living in the City, I would guess that you probably don't have alot of extra storage space. If you take the plunge, regarding parts, I found a local vintage auto parts guy- Steve Rotholz -Globe Auto Parts. He is located in Selma CA. He loves NOS and stock parts and probably has 6,000 items at his warehouse. His phone is (559) 352-1407. Leave a message if you call. His eBay name is forthebeachonly. Globe Auto Parts I was able to find quite a few Chrysler SS trim pieces, and a '54 steering wheel with almost no cracks for $50. Good luck and keep us posted.
    3 points
  32. 3 points
  33. lol ....pretty sure working on "The Brick' in 2016 for the wedding gave me that Thor like feeling....I think I removed the rubber door stops too...I like the "Clang!" Of steel in the morning. 48D
    3 points
  34. Bryan

    Don't leave tools out

    I found the bowl about 200 ft down in the woods. Was sitting up with rainwater in it. Reckon they got tired of coming up to the house to wash their hands. Also found the cat food storage container missing from a year ago.
    3 points
  35. For comparison interest if wanted. Last week I took these out of my recently rebuilt 237 engine.
    3 points
  36. I took some time to work on my brakes this weekend. I purchesed one of Charlie Akers kits a while ago and I am just now getting around to installing it. His kits are made and fit well. I test fit it before paint. I wasn’t able to complete both sides because paint drys soooo slow. I was able to complete the right side, paint on the left is still drying. Below are some pictures of the test fit and the last one is the completed work.
    3 points
  37. I did not get as prepared as I would have liked. Was trying to get the lawn mowed this week, first time of the season ... seems the lawn mower wanted some maintenance. I still need to finish my pipe saw horses for the bed to sit on. So this morning am mowing the grass, I am way past due on feeding the garden .... wont take long. Then I have the rest of the day to play with the truck .... wifey has dinner detail Yesterday afternoon I did juggle the cars around and freed up the driveway, Sure get a smile when she sits for weeks or months & fires right up after she pumps some fuel into the carb. Got her tail in the air and started removing the main bolts that hold the bed down. Only broke 1 of 5 so far 👍 I would be tickled pink if I got the rear fenders, running boards , bed hold down bolts off today. Possible but we will see how far I get
    3 points
  38. Didn’t have much on the agenda with my truck for today. I was planning a bit of a garage cleaning and organizing so that we could get back to work on my wife’s Metropolitan. But since it is IWOYTD I figured I’d start by cleaning off the truck. It tends to suffer from flat surface syndrome. Then I decided to fire it up just to hear it run. That’s when I noticed that it did need a little maintenance. The battery was dead in my clock. I swapped out the AA battery and set the clock. As I was setting the clock I looked at my shop clock for reference and realized that one needed a battery too. 🤨 Before and after photos included to satisfy the rules of IWOYTD. I should have taken the before pic last week before I made a cardboard run to the city recycle center. It was piled up with boxes. Only 1 has collected since then.
    3 points
  39. Thanks for all of Your hints: The frost plug has been exchanged successfully! Taking out the leaking plug was not difficult from below. It´s seat showed up in as-new condition. We used sealant for the replacement. However, it was impossible to hammer the new one flat in the available space. We had cleared the surrounding area (oil pipes and filter, batteries, starter…) , but that was not enough to allow for a good, strong hammering. This plug is the one closest to the oil dipstick. As an alternative to removing the engine, after having drilled a small check hole to peer through, we then drilled a 1.5 inch hole in the inner fender. Thus, avoiding interference with steering column and shift linkage, we had straight access to exactly hammer the plug flat with a strong, long rod. When turned to right, the tire did no longer impede the access. Everything went as expected except the re- connection of the oil pipes, The lower one must go into a 45 degree nipple, and neither from above nor from below could one judge the correct orientation of the union nut. Not wanting to deteriorate the thread, we only used the fingers to skrew the nut in. What may take 30 seconds under normal circumstances, this nightmare had cost us 1.5 hours, until the skew finally happened to sit. Torn fingers and a crooked back were a free extra! I alternated with my mechanic every 10 minutes because of the exhaustion we both suffered. While peereing through the check hole, we noticed that the oil pipes of the filter did not obstruct this accessway to the plug at all! Now, the plug is watertight and the oil- pipes too. With all that dirt on me, I didn´t want to touch the smartfone for pictures. Lesson learned: - dedecide if the engine has to come out - decide if you want to accept an extra hole in the inner fender- You can leave the oil pipes untouched. - decide whether the complained plug becomes reachable exactly straight through the hole - decide if You prefer to take fender and inner fender off (shield 12-04-4) Gretings from Düsseldorf Go
    3 points
  40. Modern iron for me as well. I have three old Mopars with flatties but also this ‘63 Ford 😝Fairlane 500. Just had the 260 V8 rebuilt. Non-Mopar but still a sweet car.
    3 points
  41. Pretty sure the boots for the pedals don't slide on the pedals, they are stationary on the pedal arm (near the crook in the arm) so the gap in the floor will be sealed when the pedal is 'up'. This also serves as a cushion when the pedal returns.
    3 points
  42. It all depends on what your plans are for your car. If you plan on doing a full restoration then I would concentrate on more ordinary items. Things like the #14 (not 1/4 inch) screws which MOPAR used in these years to attach the main dash structure to the body. I had to rob some off of several cars in a bone yard to get them. Things like every single molding clip you can get. Pull out a couple of window runs in the event any of your look like the base may have rusted. On the same vain, get the door or back seat window bottom channels as inevitable some may be rusted. Grab the heater motor and the radio for spare parts. The other thing that can wear out is the clutch over ride spring, and the clutch linkage. In fact take all the throttle and clutch linkage. One can rebuilt all that stuff with the car running and then just swap it out on Saturday. Grab the drive shaft and the universal joint blocks. See my posts on that as for why. Grab the all the parts associated with the parking brake. last but not least if this a fluid drive car get the fluid coupling. BUT! Make sure you read up on the posts to make the little blocks to wedge between the coupling and the flywheel plate with wire to the plate can not move when you pull the trans out and the coupling out. You want to protect that seal in the coupling at all costs. Do not balance or pry or anything else on that flywheel plate in removing it, moving it, or storing it. My two cents worth. James
    3 points
  43. got around to loading some of the hemlock logs that i felled over the winter (hazard trees near my house and shed). got them onto the dodge via a chain and the '52 8N. first trip was a load of 8' logs: took a bit to load them, as the two at each end were very heavy. the pictures are actually at the destination, a friend's portable mill. already removed the chains and binders. unloading was much faster.....i raised the dump body, and off they went... next load is still in my yard, on the truck, ready to go: i'll deliver these two (10-footers) this week.
    3 points
  44. Hooked up the wires and it started smooth as silk. Off to a show today.
    3 points
  45. Order Take out. Drive to the park by the river. Beautiful warm spring evening. Enjoy our meal in the Plymouth. Take in the view and the breeze. At 99,793 miles tonight. Reason 153 to own an old Mopar!
    3 points
  46. Here's my wide open 6 cylinder for comparison. The 6 seems to sound like it lopes along, compared to the even balanced tones from the 8. Certainly a little different cadence.
    3 points
  47. I usually finish the surfacer with 320, then apply 2 wet coats of sealer. Finish the sealer with 400 wet trying not to go through, then paint. If I go through, I'll spot seal is and shoot. I am not a pro by any means but this has worked for over 20 years. For color, I prefer a catalyzed enamel base with a urethane clear. The enamel will not give that "plastic" look urethane does, more of an "enamel" job of yesteryear. The clear is for UV protection. Cut and buff, shiny but not urethane shiny. I have an inflatable booth that works very well. Pictures of the panel I painted with that system before cut and buff.
    3 points
  48. Marc, as others have said use the same brand of primer/undercoat & colour paint and you should be fine........you mention that the primer you used is acetone based so I'm curious whether it was actually acrylic lacquer based?..........I used acrylic lacquer on my Dodge when I painted it back in 1978, when the r vinyl roof was removed about 15yrs ago a mates son repainted the roof in 2 pack, he is a professional paint & body guy so that was what he wanted to use, colour wise he matched the 2007 paint well with the 1978 paint so I'm happy..........when I painted the Dodge in 1978 I mixed up 4litres of paint into 12 litres of sprayable paint, shot 4 straight coats onto the car then started mixing some clear into the mix and shot another 2-3 coats of paint/clear mix then did the reverse, ie, mixed paint into the clear at about 70/30% clear to paint and then 2 coats of very thin clear and finally a last coat of virtually straight thinners with a small about of clear in it............then wet sanded the whole car by hand with 1200 grit wet&dry paper then used machine cutting compound by hand then polished out.............apart from all the stone chips & crazing it looks o/k ......lol..........I'm no expert but I decided that I could spend a few thousand getting someone to paint the car and really learn nothing or spend a lot less on a compressor, spray guns, paint,thinners,paper etc and whilst it may not be as perfect as the professional it will have taught me something..........and the reason my mates son did the roof is that after a couple of right shoulder operations I didn't trust myself to be able to hold the spraygun above the roof like I needed to.......lol......old age catching up........lol...........heres a pic with the yinyl top, with the top off, note the writing "vinyl top to go here" that I wrote in 1974 & the car as it is now & has been since 1978 with the Mahogany Metallic paint ............regards from Oz
    3 points
  49. When I was young, I told myself I wouldn't become like the grouchy old curmudgeon that lived down the road. After my grandpa died, my grandma met the old coot, and ended up marrying him (step-grandpa?). So I got to know him. What a life he lived. Lumberjack, WW1 veteran, auto mechanic in the '30s, contractor building US Post Offices across the Midwest, inventor (4 patents), sportsman. Died at 100 + 6 days. Turns out he didn't start out as the crotchety old man at the end of the road, just got tired of stupidity. Like me, he was a people person, but people ruined that for him.
    3 points
  50. Actually found some time yesterday morning and this morning to complete a couple of tasks on the truck. I ran the wires from under the dash to the fuel pump and completed the wiring at the pump and the gas tank sending unit. On the sending unit I added a ground wire to ensure it always had a good ground. It's not an original idea of mine, I copied someone (Possibly Merle?) who did the same thing with their new sending unit. I used some of the new aluminum wire ties that I bought recently. I think they add a nice touch And the last task completed was the oil gauge line from the firewall to the block. With that tube installed there are two things to complete before trying to start the engine. First is connecting the fuel pump wires under the dash and the second is to fill engine with oil and radiator with coolant. Getting closer Brad
    3 points
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