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  1. In the few weeks since my 1941 Chrysler Royal went back on the road in late June, I've been trying to spend time enjoying it. Been to a few cruise nights, where there are always interesting things to see and people to talk cars with. We got all 3 of our grandchildren together for a ride one day in early July, and asked them if they wanted to think up a name for the car. Our grandson (7) thought about it for about four seconds, and said "I got a great name...Carl!". So I guess that's the car's name now. Getting familiar with how it runs, I now know the "click" sound of the Vacamatic low-high upshift, which you can hear if there isn't too much ambient noise. Over the first couple hundred miles, I seem to have averaged just around or under 15 mpg (US). At mid-month since I'd put over a hundred miles on the car near home without any issues (and turned over 34,000 miles), we decided to do a little road trip to a small town on a lake nearby to meet friends for lunch. Off we went, taking our "granddog" (we were dogsitting her at the time) with us. We ended up putting 130 miles on in one day, making a biggish loop around Eastern Ontario. Although it was hot (about 28°C and sunny), the temperature gauge stayed rock steady in the middle of the range and the car cruised along secondary highways at 50-55 mph quite well. Although we're accustomed to air conditioning these days, it was not uncomfortable thanks to the shade furnished by the small windows and the Fulton visor, and a good breeze coming in through the cowl vent. The dog slept quite peacefully in her basket on the seat between us all the way back, where I tried a short stretch on a divided highway near home and got to what I estimate was nearly a true 65 mph (70 on the clock but it was reading 3-4 mph fast at 55 when we checked against the GPS on my wife's phone). On the road, a good 60 miles from home Our ridealong, chilling on a patio during lunch Taking a nap on the drive home Then we were away for a week, during which time I had our mechanic put on a new set of tie rod ends (something identified when the car was put back on the road in June, so I decided to just take care of it ASAP). When I went to pick "Carl" up, I found he had made a friend. Carl with his friend he met at the shop Last Friday, I went to a very well-attended neighbourhood cruise night where I saw lots of interesting things and also learned a lesson. After the event, I decided to drive around a bit before going home. It was getting dark and I turned on the headlights. As I was driving on the suburban roads near home, I thought I was having trouble shifting the Vacamatic - it didn't seem to want to shift up when I lifted my foot off the gas around 25 mph and took a bit of finagling. When I pulled into the driveway at home, the idle sounded fast. I know that these things rely on the idle speed for the shift to occur properly, so I started wondering if the choke had an issue, or does the carb require adjustment or rebuilding. Reading service articles and checking the records I had for the car, I started pencilling in plans to investigate it properly. The carb had been rebuilt a few years ago by a previous owner. What could be wrong? The next day I coincidentally decided to take a look under the dash to see if I could identify the source of a leak that drips some water on the floor when I wash the car (likely the cowl vent - jury still out on that). While I was on my back on the floor with a flashlight, I noticed the knob next to the headlight knob (both unlabelled) was slightly pulled out. That was the hand throttle control. It's likely I pulled it out a bit when I was looking for the headlight switch the night before and didn't push it all the way back in. Fast idle solved, and a little trip yesterday to take two of the grandkids for a donut (not eaten in the car!) and to the park showed that the shifting was as it should be again. So a very simple explanation, not some deep, dark issue with the choke or carburetor. These old cars are not anywhere near as idiot-proof as modern ones, although maybe the idiots these days are just that much better... Meantime, after over 300 miles the car doesn't appear to have used any oil at all, which is gratifying. It was really easy to get used to driving it and I feel right at home behind the wheel now. I hope to get another run in it this week before our family vacation.
    11 points
  2. I have three great old Mopars but I also own a 1963 Ford Fairlane 500. I’ve owned this car since 1979. It was once a daily driver but became a keeper. Motor was getting tired and I had the original 260 V8 rebuilt nearly two years ago. Yes, those are the right engine colours for the year. Ford engine blue arrived a few years later. Radiator was recored and the leaky transmission checked over and all new gaskets. Seats were always a bit shabby and had after-market solid blue seat covers for years. This last winter I sent off the original covers to SMS in Oregon and they made new ones same as the originals. Took a while but they did nice work. My local upholsterer put them over the original frames with new padding. I got them in the car last Friday. Been driving it lots!! One of my favourite views.
    8 points
  3. Thanks in part to many here, my You Tube revenue goes right back into betterment of my ‘38 Mopars. Recently I acquired a digital Ultrasonic cleaner. 15L (3-ish gallon) size. I completed my first project with it this last weekend. I disassembled my Chrysler carb as far as I could. I soaked it in the tub basket for 90 mins. Little implosions did their magic. I reassembled the carb with new carb kit parts. It looks like a million bucks. Will it perform as such? We shall see. I’m currently playing hide-and-go-seek games with another machine shop. “We’ll be done with your head in 1 week”. That was 11 days ago. They won’t answer the phone. They won’t return messages that I leave asking for an update. What is it with good old fashioned customer service? Are we past that now? No longer required? So we wait for the cylinder head before we can test run the carb. Anyway, thanks for your support folks. Thanks for watching my videos. You are contributing indirectly to keeping my ‘38 cars alive and on the roads!
    7 points
  4. keithb7

    Oil Pan Suprise

    10W30 20W30 15W40 20W40 20W50 Don’t run synthetic Add zinc! Use oil designed for diesel engine! Use Hot rod oil with zinc already added! Add lead to fuel! Run synthetic oil! 0W50 Add Marvel Mystery Oil to crankcase! Add marvel mystery oil to fuel tank! Run SAE30! There yes indeed, there is your single firm, solid answer. If anything if might prevent 25 more posts in this thread. Maybe. Maybe not. Lol. 😄
    6 points
  5. I LOVE driving my old car. My Subaru is like driving a sensory deprivation chamber with a TV screen. No road feel, No feed back from the steering wheel, the shifter, The brakes, the clutch, the seat. I get in my old Plymouth and she speaks to me. I know what the tires are doing, I know what the breaks are doing, I can feel the clutch engaging. Even at 35mph I prefer my Plymouth. TO ME, its like walking through a forest in your bare feet. I think growing up with cars that actually had road feel, For me its just returning to the norm after a long absence. I would guess that people who have only driven newer cars dont understand the feed back and vibrations of older Mechanical systems, so feel out of sorts. But that is just MY OPINION.
    6 points
  6. Not a 38' but close enough.. It's about time I get it out here on the web. My 37' P4 coupe. Same color as your 38 I believe. Stock drive train but engine is a flathead out of a 53'.
    6 points
  7. Some may remember awhile back I started a thread to ask the general readership here about sourcing, setting up and the what the observed performance gains of Speed Equipment on an early Dodge straight 6 might actually be. I asked these questions after leaning into the search abilities of this site for all the information I could wean out. I very much appreciated the responses of those that had thoughts on the subject and, perhaps like others, was surprised that the articles posted (all vintage) during the day stated performance on the Speed Parts mentioned are “not known.” As much as one would want to think otherwise, the available vintage products are either very expensive, if in reasonable shape, but much of the vintage material is pretty rough shape and modified. Modified parts tell an experience eye something, there is not much to suggest it worked well back in the day. Bright exceptions exist for newly produced Speed Parts and that is what I am going to touch on in this thread. Folks, it doesn’t take an Elon to tell us that available speed parts are in freefall for anything other than Ford. Enter my own project and a discussion on Speed Parts. Speed Parts for Dodge (et al.) Straight 6’s is poor. While understandable; with close to a 100 years since new, what can one really expect to find for Speed Parts for the early MOPAR models? Well, with the exception of George Asche and Son the supply is close to zilch and if you are thinking about the Montana Boys actually coming back and being a force in the next number of years and concentrating on Speed Parts as opposed to bling, after holding my breath, I have fully exhaled and gotten on with it. Want broadly supported early Speed Parts? Do what most people do and buy an early Ford and have reasonable/typical access, even new and sometimes improved new blocks. If you are a Dodge owner and want to begin the process read on. Most likely you will end up talking to George Asche. I would also suggest you know or be a machinist with good mechanic skills and performance builds under your belt. Swapping out the Straight 6 and dropping in a V8 is what most do and the lack of Speed Parts is partly why. No news there either. I have a Dodge and I am keeping the 6. Some background, I have been working on a Dodge heavy horsepower beast for decades. I wrote technical pieces for years on mechanically supercharging the V10 and was “mapping” in a car when most thought that meant going from point A to B. Injection, atmospheres, compression, ignition, flow and lambda all day long for years. Having said that, the majority of that work has absolutely nothing to do with actually deriving any significant improvements in performance in an early 1930 Dodge straight 6. With one exception, knowing that these engines are air breathing flow machines. Knowing what a proper breathing engine actually means and how to get there and having worked towards lambda for longer than many have been alive is an advantage. To the extent that a 1930 engine can be improved, it is to a very large part going to be all about flow and, to a much larger extent, keeping the engine in one piece. Have reasonable expectations for a 30’s modified stock straight 6 engine that is going to be registered for the road and still look and sound “reasonably” like a stock car as opposed to a hot rod. The actual improvements that would be felt in the seat of your pants are going to require a very broad combination of applied work and parts to achieve anything truly measurable and noticeably faster. Here let me sum this up for you, in the case of 1934 straight 6, improve the restriction in the exhaust manifold, tuning your carb, increase the compression safely, improve the pistons (overbore), use the highest test gas you can, consider a performance crank and you are close to done. Take note; with the exception of the exhaust manifold all of those changes cannot be seen when finished. Louder is not what I am talking about here, nor is fuel efficiency, I am talking about flow that creates horsepower that makes a measurable speed difference. I am confident that, with a stock transmission, the whole of that performance upgrade will best be felt when you are able to accelerate up a steep incline to a noticeable extent faster. As a result of being able to build rpms faster, you can move through the stock gears faster or swap out gears and actually achieve higher speeds. Also, never discount the remarkable effect of fresh, balanced tires. That is what many want and that is what they will most likely achieve if they are realistic. And so.....we begin with the following.... The engine has been completely rebuilt again (third time) and is currently running like a top. Everything mentioned has been done with the exception of a new grind on the crank. Why? Well because I might cross that bridge when I come across a resource for one. Exhale. What you see here is single Stromberg, and it is true that I did not list out dual carbs on my short list of things mentioned above, right? Right. So why is George's dually here? The answer is because George Asche represents exactly what a healthy Speed build hobby should have, a deeply experienced, knowledgeable and committed Speed Parts contributor. This gentleman is a pleasure to deal with, so I did. George has provided dual and triples for 6s, depending on the block, and he provided the superior intake you see here. I would have bought his intake and put it on a shelf just to thank people like him. What I am getting is better intake flow because of the raised nature of the manifold, its superior internal surfaces and the opportunity for better fuel efficiency. Swapping out to the duals is where a good amount of thoughtful work begins. There are some major changes that will occur if we actually change out the intake manifold, among them are; - We will be separating the intake from the exhaust manifold as it relates to the warm-up heat exchanger that Dodge provided. This allows for the heat from the exhaust manifold to warm up the air/gas mixture in the intake initially. Once warmed enough, a spring loaded thermal coil spring will close a gate separating the two. It works perfectly as long as the spring is in good shape and the gate is free. It should also be noted that the intake will warm up perfectly without it in about 4 minutes longer. When you unbolt the stock manifold, you are left with a gapping hole in the top of the exhaust manifold. More on that later. - That hole means no heat to the intake. Now it get down right weird. The Hatfields and McCoys had nothing on those that engage in the notorious “icing” issue that has somehow come about around "unheated" intake manifolds. Perhaps you have heard that, in the absence of the aforementioned heat exchanger, that the intake acts as a “natural refrigerator” and will ice up your intake? And the solution? Pumping hot radiator fluid through a sealed galley in the intake to insure that your intake won’t turn into an icicle. Let me help, no it won’t. If it did this Ford Model B made by George Riley for Henry Ford himself, which ran alcohol under hand pump pressure and was no where near the exhaust manifold, would be an ice cube. It didn't, wasn’t and won't. Maybe at the arctic in the winter, but the track there is seasonal. In fact, the issue is not cold but rather over heating the intake manifolds as the vast majority of Dodge 6’s did not really have functioning thermal gates and the intakes ran hot to the point of vaporizing gas in the float bowl and other forms of fuel heat saturation . The vast majority of electric pump installations are for heat soak, not the “Ice Box” physics. When someone tells you the “science is settled,” smile and remember alcohol in dual Winfields. - The whole linkage issue surfaces immediately. Buckle up, here we go. As most of us know, these early Dodge break down into essentially three major categories, those carbs that are actuated by the stock throttle and choke assembly crossing over the head from the driver side, those that travel along the fire wall to the passenger side and then attach to the intake side of the engine, and lastly those Dodges that have the “special feature” throttle/choke/cruise control capabilities. In the case of the 1934 Dodge DR convertible coupe, we are confronted with all three; there is a full firewall pass to the passenger side and a single marvel of an actuator that incorporates in a single design; the throttle and a speed adjustable feature. The choke is a typical separate run, more on this below. It does all this while working with the stock carb by moving the carb mounted accelerator UP, not down. I am going to use the whole stock shooting match, so that means that I will need to reverse the original actuator to operate. I will do that by keeping George’s linkage work on the head side and building an intake side assembly that engages with his dual accelerators. Now remember that George’s intake importantly adds height to the primitive original stock intakes, so that my work will need to potentially address the rod that is attached to the firewall transit bar and run to the newly placed original actuator. That work I am modeling and, if there is interest, I will post the final design in regard to location, attachment, reversal of motion etc. If yu are wondering what and where those air filters came from, they are from a great East Coast resource "O'Brians Truckers" https://www.obrientruckers.com/ and are a recreation of the early oil bath customs except with a high flow cleanable air filter element. They are mounted on the carbs with an adapter ring made out of aluminum as I have had no luck with the plastic ones. - Low pressure gas runs will have to be made and run to the duals. Low pressure hard lines have many advantages around not needing to do flair work. Why is that important? Because we can avoid the impactful extended lengths required to make flairs that interrupt tight radius bends. Flair tools need to be set behind the work and with the exception of those that have a Canter flair tool(1940s) and that required length is too long. Equally true, when flared, that flare requires the lead-in into a tight radius bender tool to be too long. If you think that using the wonderful copper/nickel hard line (seen here) is going to make that all better with flares, it won’t. What does work, is using low pressure compression fittings that utilize the bead/pit. Just be sure to tighten them gently as you can always make them tighter. Yes you can barb and run flex tubing but the barb itself is too long for a compact flex bend and, well, it’s a Dodge not a Tecumseh. Why the gauge? Four cases, first is that these carbs are sensitive to over pressure. Over pressure will flood the bowel. Second is that the mechanical fuel pumps are known to quit and you can instantly see the deterioration if that is the case (carry a spare). Thirdly, there are any number of available fuel logs that make running one easy. Fourth, fuel gauges, especially the rarer low pressure type send an important message that the builder is fully susceptible to using any excuse to mount yet another gauge, if only to draw the eye to the well set out hard line runs. In short (pun intended), if you want to really run a single clean line from a Dodge original mechanical pump to a dually set and want to onboard both a fuel log and gauge, you can. And the runs are so well supported that the whole rig is a marvel of anti vibration. But you are going to need an onboard backing plate. I came with and tested a ton of designs, both on the duals and/or the head or the firewall. Every possible hold down nut was tried and I ended up with what you see here, a simple one access point that is firm as can be especially with the hard line. My son in law made it up in stainless but one of the exact test plates can be seen in raw steel on the top right near the wood. The pic below all the test plates shows how it wraps around and attached to the right hand carb's main mounting bolt. - Two carbs, two chokes. You only will ever really need to choke one to make a well tuned car run so what about the 2nd carb's choke. While many just wire or short pipe them statically closed, one can always just make a tiny manual choke linkage. - Remember the part about separating the intake from the exhaust manifold and therefor opening up a center hole where the heat transfer took place. Lets talk about flow and exhaust manifold. This subject can create friction, but nowhere near the “refrigerator conundrum.” Flow is not satisfied by cutting the original cast iron Dodge exhaust header in two, boxing both ends while adding a flange to the forward threesome. It attends to the over pressure issue of the front 3 exhaust ports, but laterally cross flowing exhaust in a box that sits right on the block and exits stage rear is a nominal improvement. Will it help? Of course. It also commits you to running dual exhaust pipes and mufflers that would most likely need to be crossed closer, not farther, down the run. What good headers do is allow the exhaust to travel as far away from the block as possible directly out from the block and then the bend route begins along its final path. None of the lateral boxes do this as well as a smooth direct exit should. Fentons? Better, as the exit has much better outflow than the original and smooth pipes are better than any of the boxed variants. But, and its a real big but, the Fentons were never designed properly as they come way too close to the stock fuel pump. How close? Close enough that anyone would have know if and when the Fenton design was to be copied, that should be immediately fixed by simply moving the forward three inches ...away ...from ...the ...fuel ...pump. Wait...it was copied. Sorry. At least that copy, unlike the original comes with verbiage that goes something like this “now that you mentioned it, you need to run an electric fuel pump as these header...(wait for it)...run way too close to the original fuel pump.” With an electric fuel pump, the original and copied Fentons will work. I am not running an electric fuel pump and I wont be using Fentons or their copy. So what comes next? Folks, the answer is real headers. Simply put, good exhaust flow on the straight 6 is the vast majority of a performance build in the absence of a hot crank. Re-read that last sentence please. I am exploring properly made steel headers that properly allow for flow and are away from the fuel pump. Are they made? Yes, but unfortunately not out of stainless and would therefor need Jet Hot or some coating to actually last long enough to be worth the money. And, as we all know cast iron is much quieter that any steel build so I will lament the day somebody decided to redo the Fentons and not attend to the obvious flaws. If you read this far, thanks. Let me know if you want to see this all unfold. The assembly will be done this winter.
    5 points
  8. Be very careful. You may need to "educate" the inspector. Odds are her or she has no idea of that they are looking at. Let me explain. The 1930 to early 1950's MOPAR's used a "nut and bolt" bearing design. There are no rubber bushings and there are no smooth wall bearings-bushings. The center block of the control arms pivots are in essence a threaded rod. The "nuts" which go into the control arms are threaded on the inside to thread onto those threaded rods and the outside is designed to cut into the control arm like a self tapping bolt. When UNLOADED there is a LOT of play in these type of designs. It was engineered that way. Time and time again I see people pulling the front end apart thinking they have "worn" control arm bushing. When in fact they did not. The bushings are "out of specification" when they have more than 20 thousands of clearance. That is a lot. See the attached PDF and the attached image. Check them yourself and if they are equal to or less than 20 Thousands then educate the inspector. James Control_arm_bushing_clearnace.pdf
    5 points
  9. Hi Mopar guys...as I toil away on another pile of rust...I recall how much I don't really enjoy driving these old vehicles...love love love to tinker on them...but the thing that hurts me the most is pulling out on the roadway where I live and actually taking it down the road....it is terrifying to say the least... My last old project car I drove on the roadways was a 1968 VW Bug...it would run down the road ok (once I got it wound up) but it was so slow getting it going...people right up my back side was a common occurrence...close calls every single time I took it out too... So I think some of us are drivers and some of us are builders...I am a cobber/builder...but I have saved several old heaps from getting thrown away and allowed others to take my projects and make them their own.... Thanks for listening... Happy grinding everyone...
    4 points
  10. Yes I agree that keeping the car original has its appeal. So as many of you have read that I drove my stock 1939 Desoto from valley forge Pa to Altoona Pa to attend the National desoto clubs car show and convention back in June. I drove the car on the Pa Turnpike the posted speed limit goes from 55-70 MPH. I drove the 39 at the average speed of 50-53 and stayed inthe right lane. I had blinker lights like what would be used on a bicycle attached to the my license plate and also reflective plastic strips over the rear bumpers. We drove a total of 550 miles. I would like to say that i did not have any issues with truckers or other car. They all gave me plenty of room and no one was on my butt going each direction. On my way home i even had a tractor Trailor stay behind me all the way from Harrisburg Pa to valley forge for an approx distance of 75 mile and acted as a buffer to my car. When he went around me I waved a big thank you to him and he replied with a pull on his air horn. So yes you can still travel with these older cars but you also have the responsibility to be aware of your surroundings and to give the other guys the room they also require. Rich Hartung desoto1939@aol.com
    4 points
  11. Annual car show day in my town. Just this one familiar flathead mopar in attendance. Tons of folks enjoying the car.
    4 points
  12. I used to be of the modify camp. Then I saw all the other modified cars and realized there are less and less stock (around my area). Each time you modify one, you lose appeal to a certain segment. With that said, I do not chastise or think no one should modify their car - it is YOUR car. Have fun with it. I just find I get more comments with it stock. I will make safety modifications - brakes and seatbelts, or period accessories (NOS Mopar pieces). And for me, there is a charm in driving an old car. I do not take the freeway much at all, so most of my driving is surface streets. I find my cars can hold their own there. The older I get, the less I want to rush. Again, to each their own, just make sure to have fun!
    4 points
  13. My Chrysler is running fantastic. The cylinder head swap was well worth the time investment. A couple of leaky valves were also sealed up. Best of all are the results of the carb cleaning in the ultrasonic cleaner, then rebuilt. Its running so nice and smooth now. I also checked my throttle linkage. I put a couple of bricks on the gas pedal, so it was to the floor. (engine not running of course) I then proceeded to check my throttle valve at the carb base. I still had room to open it further. I then twisted a threaded rod in the throttle linkage, making it longer. Now the throttle was opening further. All the way now, wide open. I definitely picked up more HP and torque. She's pulling harder than ever. Did I mention smooth? Very happy with the latest work I completed on this engine. A rewarding project. Tonight at dusk it cooled off enough to take this car, and make it do what it was built to do. Thanks to everyone at Chrysler Canada in 1938.
    4 points
  14. Its been so hot in this mountainous area, I’ve been driving my Mopars very little. We have been seeing 100F for the past week. The big hill home packs a punch to the cooling systems on both of my cars. This morning I got up before the sun to hit the roads and grab a coffee. Nice and cool, about 72F. I’ve missed enjoying them. I wish I could say say the cars have benefited by maximizing my time in the garage. Not so. The garage hits 100 each day as well. Small projects have me leaking worse than an old radiator. Next week we are expecting a cooling period. Very quiet out here this morning. Nice. Very nice.
    4 points
  15. Hook up oil pressure gauge. Remove coil wire at distributor so engine cannot start. Crank over engine and watch oil pressure gauge. You should build pressure while cranking. Do not start engine unless you have oil pressure. No pressure? Remove and prime oil pump and repeat process.
    4 points
  16. After a long hiatus, i finally been able to return to Elise to finish up work I started back in January. I've been upgrading the electrical system, and doing long awaited maintenance to root out wiring gremlins in the Fluid Drive. On the agenda: 1. Rebuild Carburetor (Done) 2. Rewire starting circuit (done) 3. Rewire Fluid Drive Circuit (done) 4. repaint engine (done) 5. install alternator (done) 6. install 6v fan (tbd) Now it's all about the putting it back together ..... oil change, trans oil change, adjusting the timing (I may need to move the pump a notch or two), wire up a few indicator lights. You'd think it would go faster and then you run into these silly threading issues, or even the oil canister - it's a bit of a jigsaw with the pipes - you need to put the inner one first in the block so you can get it tight, attach the outer one to the canister, and then attach it all together on the engine so pieces work... took a while to work that out. sigh. but I'm oving it.
    4 points
  17. Booger

    Rear Main

    I know most of us would like to have spotless garage floors. Some are "leakers" some are not. replaced rear main 6 months ago. theres a little puddle. cardboard does wonders for your garage floor
    3 points
  18. Kilgore47

    Oil Pan Suprise

    I finally got brave enough to pull the oil pan on the 47 P15 today. It was actually easy. Except for the really grubby part. Stuff falling in my face. Probably going to toss that T shirt in the garbage. When I adjusted the valves there wasn't any sludge in there. So I didn't expect to find very much if any in the pan. I found a little more than a quarter inch of sludge in the bottom of the pan. The pick up screen was clean. The surprise part is that under the black sludge there was a gray sludge. This gray matter is dense and around the outside and in the corners. It has metal in it. I was able to pick up the metal with a magnet. The other surprise part is that I also found small wire brush parts in the gray sludge. The wire brush parts were probably left over from the rebuild in the mid 70's. The other very fine metal flake looking stuff may be from the break in 45 years ago. Metal in the pan is never a good thing. But the gray sludge appears to have been held in place all these years by the black sludge. I checked the rods and there is a little front to back movement but no up and down movement that I could feel. The PO told me they put a rebuilt engine in the car in 1974 when they pulled it out of a field. They also told me that it didn't have many miles on it. I guess it is what it is. I'm going to clean everything I can get to and put it back together with a magnet glued to the drain plug. Drain the oil in a couple of hundred miles and see in any more metal has collected on the magnet. I'm also going with a detergent oil when I put it back together. Not telling what viscosity I'll be using. That would get too many comments😁 More news latter
    3 points
  19. RNR1957NYer

    Show your tools.

    Shorter and longer, you say...
    3 points
  20. Rub the brown crud extruding from the weep hole between your fingers. Is it grease or is it rusty coolant water? That’ll give you clues as to your next move.
    3 points
  21. 1954 Plaza wagon, working on getting the wiring squared away and actually got to drive it the other day, it goes and stops on its own. It sat for many many years. Here's the new lenses I got about two years ago, almost like Christmas.
    3 points
  22. New inspection today. I have found the four bolts that connect the gearbox to the drive shaft very loose...I have set my hopes on this. Tomorrow we have planned a 200km trip. After that, I'll know... 🙂
    3 points
  23. I could certainly understand your feelings there. I literally hate driving in any city traffic with any vehicle. I think for many people just having the project is the reward. And working on old technology may be a form of relaxation. I think I have been working on my project over 3 years now. I have seriously thought about just giving up on it & sell it to another. Now I'm working on the back side of the vehicle. You can see my goal by looking at the front. I'm not restoring the vehicle, Just repairing it to a runner driver & some sort of paint protection is part of it. I have not touched my truck for 2 months now. ..... I was disabled with a back injury when I was 48 years old, I have some serious Sciatica (Arthritis in the tail bone.) All that means is my back is shot & have nerve pain in my legs from waist down. I am 60 years old today. .... Not a matter of pain, just how much pain today? I took the wife to walmart yesterday. I simply need 2 days to recover. Same time I have a vegetable garden, I need to get some canning done for the winter .... I own A house that needs maintained ..... What little time I do have is often not on my project. ...... I sure enjoy having it when I have the time. Just saying, I love having the project .... If I get to finish it is another story.
    3 points
  24. I think we need to remember that the Wizard is first and foremost a media person. I suspect he never intended to keep the car long term as his main business is making videos for YouTube and also cable tv shows. He and his fellow producers are always buying and selling cars. I am sure he has some favorites but I have heard him speak about driving this car or that car around but very few of them are around very long. I don’t doubt he enjoys, maybe loves cars but unlike us it seems his attachment to old cars is not as firm. If you see one of his latest where he says he is no longer going to work on old cars in his shop he mentions he doesn’t even want to own one anymore. Unlike many of us who seem to genetically mandated to own and work on our old vehicles.
    3 points
  25. My favorite of the show was this all original 1935 Dodge that was in the movie "Public Enemies" with Johnny Depp. I wanted to drive it!
    3 points
  26. My opinion,and worth every nickel it costs you,is to rebuild your stock front suspension with new springs,new shocks,etc,etc,etc. The truth is you are not going to go road racing with the 42 coupe,so you really don't need suspension upgrades if all you are going to to is drive it and enjoy it. Maybe add front disc brakes and upgrade the shocks using modern ones instead of factory standard all around,but that is all I would do to the suspension.
    3 points
  27. hypoid extreme pressure (HGL SAE 90) for the axle and GL1 for the transmission that is if you have a standard three speed and not a fluid drive unit...each is filled till the fill hole is just flush inside with oil just starting to run out....rule of thumb for safe level is pinky inserted into the fill hole to first joint and pointing down and if touching oil...considered good to go....
    3 points
  28. nonstop

    I Learned a Lesson…

    Hi all, Just thought I might pass along a quick little lesson I learned yesterday as a PSA… So my Royal with a Hemi has been blowing blue smoke after sustained highway runs, but not around town or in stop and go traffic. Well through deduction (and because it already happened before), I concluded I had a plugged oil return hole. After pulling off the valve cover on the side that was clogged last time, I was met with a head covered with sludge. I proceeded to clean it off best I could and then blow any loose stuff off (mess in itself). So now comes the time to clean the oil returns. I forgot there are only 2. I take out the gun cleaning kit. I run a .357 brush down the rear hole (like last time). It works pretty well. I move to the front. It is met with some resistance. After a little wiggling, it frees up and I pull the rod out - without the brush on the end. I briefly panic thinking the worst and I might have to do major surgery to get the brush out of an oil return passage. Long story short, I was able to get it pushed through and now have a barrel brush in the oil pan to be fished out at next oil change. Moral of the story - be careful what you shove down the oil holes!
    3 points
  29. Hi Everyone, I just picked up this 1951 Plymouth Cambridge this weekend and have some basic service questions. In an earlier life I was a professional auto mechanic so I know my way around a car pretty good, but an early 50's car is something new to me. After I got the car home I figured I'd start with checking the basics. The bias-ply tires looked a little low so I checked the pressure. About 22 psi in all 4 so I inflated them up to 32. When I took it for a ride afterwards, I noticed it seemed to be more sensitive to imperfections in the road and would get jerked around a little when hitting a patch or groove in the road. When I drove the car the 90 miles home @ 22 psi, I did not notice that. Is it common on these old cars (and bias-ply tires) to reduce the tire pressure for better handling? The engine oil looked pretty dirty so I wanted to get that changed right away. But I didn't know the oil type or capacity. Fortunately, a service manual was included with the car and I was able to get the oil capacity and recommended oil viscosity. I'm guessing it's a copy of a period manual because it recommends 30W oil for the summer. Is that would I should use, or would a 10W-30 be fine? Thanks
    3 points
  30. Some time in the next year I will be pulling the 251 in the 1947 Desoto. This cam (NOS) and lifters were all brand new when I put them in. I have not used a high zinc oil. I did check the cam and lifters to make sure they passed a rockwell test. This engine is in the 4500-5000 pound Suburban which at 60K miles of San Francisco City Traffic and 70 MPH highway traffic to and from our place out of town will be an excellent test case as to if we need to worry about zinc or not. When I pull this engine apart we will be able to see how much wear this is and answer the zinc question as it applies to these engines. I am curious as to what I find. James
    3 points
  31. The second thing to be VERY careful about is when replacing a bushing if it is off as little as one rotation you can toss out the Castor Alignment and may not be able to get it back no matter how far you turn the eccentric adjuster. Why? Because the placement of the control arms sets the inclination of the arm that hold the kind pins. If the relative distance between the lower control arm and the upper control arm is moved then that changes the inclination. On my 1949 Desoto, either the factory screwed up and did not get it right (only six months production on those and it was running very late) or I screwed up when I did mine. I have the castor adjusted with the eccentric all the way to the rear and I just get -1%. Technically just within spec but I noticed I really need more for it to be stable. I am going to pull the nuts on the lower at some point and move the lower control arm one turn forward so that I can get more castor and get the eccentric to be in the middle of that rather small adjustment range. You do not want the eccentric rubbing on one side or the other of the control arm. See the manual or the Imperial Club Lit on this subject and you will see what I am talking about. That is why if they are ok it is beast to leave well enough alone. I doubt your mechanic, unless he/she is 70 years old has any idea what they are getting into with this suspension. It takes a lot more detail than a modern rubber bushing suspension to do correctly. James
    3 points
  32. TodFitch

    3rd gear missing

    If you were able to use 3rd gear before you put the new clutch in then I suspect that the issue is in the alignment or adjustment of the shift linkage rather than in the transmission.
    3 points
  33. This is the story of a very dedicated flathead-era Mopar enthusiast. Bryan, nobody can you aren't motivated. Over here I am trying to decide if it's worth my time to drive 3 hours each way in an air conditioned modern truck, to pick up a Mopar engine for under $100. Then go for a leisurely swim in the very warm Osoyoos lake while I am there. Stop at a few fruit stands. Grab an ice creme cone. Maybe have the meatloaf & mashed potatoes dinner at the "Home Restaurant" on the trip back home. You're making me feel a little guilty over here. Maybe as a reward for your hard work, I'll buy an extra ice creme cone for you, and eat it on your behalf. To help keep you motived here's the lake where the engine is .😁
    3 points
  34. Dansk

    Brake adjustment tool

    I don't have one of the tools shown in my shop manual for adjusting brake shoes to be concentric so I bought some 3/4" x 1/8" bar stock at the hardware store and made this up. It folds like a jack knife for storage. My dimensions are 6" for the uprights and 4.5" for the blade. Simple to make if you have a welder to tack it to the 3/4-16 nut.
    3 points
  35. Well I drove 2.5 hours from Philadelphia to Carlise on Friday morning. Had to sit in the regular traffic jam from the turnpike all the way into the center of town. If you do have a MoPar that is manufacturered prior to the mid 70-1980 then I would like to tell you from my first hand experience that do not waste your time attending. The cost to enter the grounds is $15 plus $10 parking. I walked the entire swap area. To note there was not one vender with any pre-post war and up to the 60s with any parts, not even any ignition parts such as point, cond, rotor or caps to fit our cars. I did find one MoPar flat head 6 water pump and this was for the years around 1937-48 but it was in rough shape. I have seen the decline in parts for our MoPar over the years and this was the worst. Lots of old used and some NOS high performance stuff. If you have a cuda, road runner GTX and similar then you will find items. So this is my last year to attend Chryslers at Carlise. I will save the costs and use that to go to Hershey in the Fall. I feel that you might even have better luck at a local swap meet for the early vintage items. Lots of nice cars on the show ground most earliest in Building T was a 1930 Desoto ruble seet coupe basically original, als a 37 Dodge sedan under one of the tents and a56 Desoto Ambulance-Herst. So baically pick your poison or save you money and yes even buy off of ebay at least you can do that from you home with out any travel fees. Rich Hartung Desoto1939@aol.com
    3 points
  36. Sounds like a super hero t shirt deal. I am METAL MAN ! . Unfortunately my side kick would be The Corrosion Kid.
    3 points
  37. the Freewheeling Tony Smith's daughter makes and sells them. https://www.facebook.com/commerce/products/flathead-magnetic-oil-pan-drain-plug/1978244612277057/?ref=page_shop_tab&referral_code=page_shop_tab_card
    3 points
  38. I looked at my Chrysler and it looks like this: The 2 that are diagonal to each other are the heater core feed/return hoses. The 3rd one, almost in the middle of the firewall, is for a drain hose for the cowl vent.
    3 points
  39. No need for dual mufflers or a crossover. I have the Fenton copies. Dual headpipes, 2" diameter feeding a Y pipe, dual 2" in one 2.5" out that feeds a nice 2.5" in/out turbo muffler and 2.5" pipe out to the bumper. Simple and easier to fit up than duals all the way out.
    3 points
  40. Marc, the concerns with using PVC for air is the failure mode.....hundreds of razor-sharp pieces of PVC being projected at horrendous speed. Also due to this being compressed air, it is a relatively long-term event as the pressure slowly bleeds down and can literally unzip the compromised pipe. I had PVC air lines in my shop for awhile but after thinking about it I took them out. I now have a multi-outlet manifold at the compressor and run conventional air hoses to where ever they are needed. Safest hard line material is copper or iron.
    3 points
  41. TravisL17

    Memories and Milestones

    Today was a great day making memories and hitting a milestone. It's a bit of a story, so hang in there. Back in October 1996, Ed and Jane bought a 1950 Meadowbrook with around 69k miles that had spent the last 14 years in storage. It was the first classic car they owned together. Over winter and spring they put in a lot of work, bringing the car back to life. In June of 1997 the Meadowbrook attended its first Back To The 50's car show in St Paul, MN. Over the years they made a lot memories with the Meadowbrook and cataloged most of them. They took a trip to Mackinac Island that included a ride on the S.S. Badger ferry across Lake Michigan. For Ed's 50th birthday they drove it to Tulsa Oklahoma to attend the opening of the time capsule with the 57 Belvedere inside. After 22 years of ownership and declining health, it was time for them to sell. In January of 2019 my wife and I purchased the Meadowbrook with around 92k miles on it. We hit it off with Ed and Jane and formed a friendship. We've gone on a few car cruises with them and keep in touch throughout the year, sending them pictures and updates as we make family memories with the Meadowbrook. Earlier this week I realized the Meadowbrook was 68 miles from turning over 100k. Ed's house is 67 miles away, it was meant to be. I called him up and asked if he'd like to ride along for the rollover. He was in! Today was the day! With my wife and son along, we headed down to Ed and Jane's house. Busy doing math in my head, I missed a turn along the way and didn't quite make it to Ed's house before running out of odometer. So I stopped on the side of a quiet road at 99,999.0 miles and had Ed and Jane meet us. Knowing that he'd likely want to drive, I saved the last mile for him. After a few minutes waiting on the roadside they pulled up behind us. I asked Ed if he'd like to ride along or drive, of course he said "drive!". He was overflowing with excitement to have the opportunity to drive the Meadowbrook again, and for such a milestone! Ed never stopped smiling and commenting how much he's missed the Dodge and how great it drives. We stopped for a couple photo opportunities, just before and right after the rollover mark Then Ed drove back to their house. He let my son drive their Harley Davidson golf cart around their property while we hung out for a while chatting about life, cars and of course, the weather. I had also put together a small gift for Ed and Jane to mark the 25 year anniversary of the Meadowbrook attending Back To The 50's. I found the spot they parked in back in 1997 and took the same photo during this year's 50's. I framed it with the dash plaques by their respective pictures. 25 years of growth and change makes the background hardly recognizable. But I knew it was the spot because of the silos and water tower in the far distance. Out of appreciation, Ed and Jane gave me some incredible Dodge advertisements. I had secretly admired these from the first time I went to their home to look at the Meadowbrook before purchasing it. I had found similar advertisements online over the years, but none this nicely framed. Today is a day that I will always remember. I know Ed will too. I had no idea it would mean so much to Ed to be a part of hitting the 100k mile mark with the Meadowbrook. Making memories is the best part of owning a classic. Get out there and make some memories while you can!
    3 points
  42. So I am going to give an example of old things falling by the way side. I am an avid sporting clay shooter and when I started in the early 90’s, the only thought to be competitive shotguns for the sport were the newest models over/unders. Being my father was an enthusiast of the LC Smith side by sides, I had a few to take to the sporting clay ranges. My first few times, I was told to take them home as they were ~100 years old and could be unsafe. Well, I listened to those folks and bought some high end late models over/unders. My father was not happy as he felt they were still quality, competitive guns and had a place in the world to be enjoyed. At the time, those guns could be had for a few hundred dollars and a sixteen gauge was worthless as all ammo dried up. 20 years ago my father as one of the charter members, formed the LC Smith Collectors Association and he represented the shooting side. The clubs’ goal was to educate and promote those guns. It started with about 6 members across the USA and now has over 1000 members. There are more competitive events held through the year in a local area than a man can attend and prices have shot up some 400% plus on the higher graded guns. A 16 gauge now is worth approximately 30% more than a 12 because of the lower production numbers. I am only giving this as an example stating that each one of us using this forum control the love of the hobby for the next generation. Sometimes we just need to think outside of the box a little, for instance; maybe include something on upcoming events that provides $$ toward college scholarships. This will grab the younger generation and some parents as well because it is something that can be done together. Just my thoughts for this morning—- Kevin
    3 points
  43. I was at a swap meet last week and ended up buying this 1965 Dodge D100 Utiline. She spent most of her life on a ranch in Coty, Wyoming. 225 slant 6 with 4 speed manual and 3.55 rear end.
    2 points
  44. I love driving my Coronet but everyone is different. I live in a rural area where I can daily drive mine and not be scared of traffic. I prefer driving to wrenching lol but I do both.
    2 points
  45. So many factors Lol. M-I-L not factored in. Riding solo. Non-Ethanol fuel. Oil bath filter. Stock brakes set correctly. Detergent 14W40. 25" block. No headers. Single carb. Maybe it's the lack of zinc in my oil. Lol. 😁
    2 points
  46. So today was the Engelhardt Performance car show near Rushford, MN. It's always fun because they have a mini drag strip, the show is free, and they feed everyone for free. Pulled pork, baked beans, potato salad, macaroni salad, watermelon and cookies for desert. This year was the largest attendance that I had seen. Here's a pic before we left, and once we were there. I didn't get a panoramic picture taken, but the show was definitely dominated by Mopars, which was strange and awesome to see!
    2 points
  47. Ahem, blocks are adjusted. Got the transmission pulled. Tried to get everything ready to bring the hoist but it got too hot (1pm). Was a lot cooler under the car. Now I know why dogs sleep under them. Wanted to get the fender off and also remove the starter, but next time. Nasty work. Got dirty but took a selfie.
    2 points
  48. Yes condensors do go bad. When was the last time that you did a real tuneup with points, condensor, rotor and cap and also new plugs and wires. Yes things do wear out over the years. Does the car start ok and idle ok but after it gets hot then you start to get the supputer? You can get a generic 6 volt coil at NAPA for around $25.00. remmebr wicth wire is the positive and the negative. The positive wire on the coil will connect at the breaker plate connection that sticks out from the inside of the dizzy and the negative will come from another point in the car maybe from the ignition switch. Alsoconsider getting a NOS breaker plate assembly since it will have everything as one complete unit and it is then basically a screw it into the dizzy and adjust the point gap. I like to have at least two on hand so you have the small internal wires
    2 points
  49. Many years back I went to a dealer to test drive a new car. The salesman kept trying to get me to punch it to see how powerful it was. Told him no thanks but he kept bugging me. So I punched it. Well the throttle stuck open and there was a red light ahead with cars stopped at it. Shifted the trans to neutral and got the car stopped in plenty of time. Turns out the dealer would flip the floor mats over so they wouldn't get dirty on the test drives. That allowed the floor mat to slide up over the gas pedal and hold it open. I knew what to do because of the experience with the junkers I had when I was a teenager. Had to be ready for failures on those old cars. The young salesman was a basket case after we stopped. Bet he never tried to get anyone to punch it again after that.
    2 points
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