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Great Engine Rebuild Video - Restoration of a Classic: Reviving the Chrysler 218 Straight 6 Flathead Engine - ASMR


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Folks I just came across this video on youtube ... Restoration of a Classic: Reviving the Chrysler 218 Straight 6 Flathead Engine

 

For folks that are curious like me but too afraid to pull parts off my car that are still working this was extremely helpful.

 

 

Just figured I would share.

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Hey boys!   Im Glad my videos got yall talking!!   I'm Dave and I run the Parts & Restoration Youtube channel.  Disclaimer: I'm NOT a mechanic. These are my videos and i'm happ

Horses for courses. Wouldn't have been the first time that he has worked on the flathead and probably shows how durable the low compression sidevalve is. Would have been plenty of home mechanics back

He'd probably look into the end to see if the water is coming out and lose an eye, then all the fun and games will be over.   That video ought to be labeled "how not to..."  If the engine ev

I watched that video recently too. I thought a rookie could learn more if there was some explanation. Why things were being done a certain way. 
 

I believe this block is getting no machining. No cylinder taper or out of round measured.  What did the crank and rod bearings measure up for wear?  Taking  the top ridge off with a reamer makes machinists cringe. My understanding is its pretty easy to wreck your cylinders doing that. Especially a rookie. 
 

If you have a you tube channel and you need content, this works to keep views up. If you need to rebuild an engine, have reliability, and good return on your investment, this fails in my opinion.
 

Its an experiment. Slam new parts into an old block. Roll the dice. See what happens. It’s entertainment. Not education  in my opinion. 

Edited by keithb7
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Real shade tree engineering there. We do what we can with what we have. Not for everyone, but I respect it a lot. A pro could nitpick that all day long, even I saw things I think could be done differently. Like I said, not for everyone, but two thumbs up from me!

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Posted (edited)

Certainly a lot of it was pretty crude ... but it provides a good glimpse of some of these old engines.  Just another perspective but provides insight.  

 

Also helps solidify that I will not be digging into my engine at any time soon.  If it stops running ... then that is another chapter to explore.  You just don't know what issues you will uncover at the age of these beauties. 

Edited by Stargrinder
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The procedure , as illustrated may need editing.  best to remove all moving parts from the block and then clean and check for cracks.

Check for undersize and oversize components and separate parts that may be serviceable and those which need replacement.

Valves are too hard to respond to lapping, especially exhaust and any removed with pliers should be extra carefully checked to see if they are bent.   Also top ring grooves must be  "on spec"  . Hastings offered a GL spacer and the procedure for installing is easily done but requires either a lathe or a "hand lathe" especially made for the purpose.  Only when all parts are cleaned , assembly may proceed.  There is little point in building a "grenade".  New parts are more expensive these days and it is a shame to waste them.    

Edited by dpollo
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Interesting video..........quite a few things I do differently but I suppose its a start for someone without much experience........would be interested in seeing the rest of it and whether it ran o/k................lol............andyd 

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Horses for courses. Wouldn't have been the first time that he has worked on the flathead and probably shows how durable the low compression sidevalve is. Would have been plenty of home mechanics back in the day doing some similar refurbs to keep the wheels on the road. Good to see another old car guy sharing his stuff.

Flip flops crack me up!

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Wow, not the way I would do this. Strip the block bare first, etc. I wonder why he is adhering the gaskets well in advance of installing. I'd think this would lead to leakage. Interesting to watch. He does use some good techniques on making your own gaskets. I was terrified by the manifold removal..

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On 1/3/2021 at 7:38 PM, oldodge41 said:

Real shade tree engineering there. We do what we can with what we have. Not for everyone, but I respect it a lot. A pro could nitpick that all day long, even I saw things I think could be done differently. Like I said, not for everyone, but two thumbs up from me!

when he hammered on the harmonic balancer..is when I lost it.

he gets an A for effort and I dug it

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At the 11:16 mark is he hammering con rod bolt threads over the crank bearing surface? Water pump gasket is what? $3? Making .015 feeler gauge from a pop can? lol. 

Did he measure all piston ring gaps in the one cylinder, #6? What if it's worn more or less than other cylinders? 😀

Edited by keithb7
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12 hours ago, michaelmarks697@yahoo.com said:

Sniper is losing his mind... But how can you not like this"Neck"?

please get a pressure washer

He'd probably look into the end to see if the water is coming out and lose an eye, then all the fun and games will be over.

 

That video ought to be labeled "how not to..."  If the engine ever runs it'd be a testament to the original engineering that it did in spite of the redneck stupidity displayed in the video.

 

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I suspect the overhaul in the video (which I got a kick out of watching) is a fair representation of how thousands of these engines were rebuilt back in the day (by people without internet training 🤣 ). Due to them being over-engineered and under-stressed, those engines no doubt transported countless families for many years.

 

If you want to see amazing repairs done on a blacksmith level, check out this YouTube channel:

 

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC64FbxoHfUWd5hykYk5_BvQ

 

Edited by Sam Buchanan
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If money dictates do this or the crusher? What say ye then? For some of us, let it sit till you can do it right, is not an option. He does some pretty crude stuff, even by my obviously low standards, but he is doing it. I have seen lots of cars scrapped because someone thinks they are beyond repair due to the exorbitant cost of doing things to some critics standard. I appreciate the 2K dollar rebuild as much as the next guy, but I also respect the shade tree mechanic that goes for it and learns as he goes. My Dad could do more with nothing than I will ever be able to do with much better resources. I have a lot of happy motoring miles driving something that would still be rotting alongside a barn if I had to spend big money to restore it, not for everyone I am sure. Probably wouldn't be any fun if it was. I try to do what works for me, but I also try to appreciate the entire spectrum of this hobby. Happy motoring!

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I see this (as others have mentioned) as a testament to how strong these engines are.  I also see it as a testament of if you have the will to do something you will find a way.

 
I saw a documentary on Amazon a couple years ago called "Havana Motor Club" which talked about the car/race scene in Cuba.  Now a lot of the stuff that those guys did was really crude but fascinating.  They did not have the modern tools and many times lacked parts, so they had to make do with what they had and learn on their own along the way.  This video kind of reminded me of that.  And the fact that these cars are many times Frankensteined together and still run shows how they were designed to stand the test of time.  

 

I have some leaks on my ride that are frustrating (e.g. the rear main) but I am going to just live with it for a while.  I don't have the tools, time, nor confidence to pull my motor and do the job.  Nor do I feel like dropping a couple thousand to have the motor rebuilt (and hope the builder really knows what he is doing).  I really need a Sniper, Keith, or other old MOPAR zen master near by to help guide me but those people are few and far between.  I will just live with it for now and always travel with a couple extra quarts of oil in the trunk. 

 

I really do applaud those that are not afraid to take the plunge.  And this guy said up front that he is not a mechanic ... just a guy that enjoys tinkering so my hats off to him.

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"Couple of thousand" mentioned for an engine rebuild is not reality today. $2K might get you all the parts needed. Then there's the machining and labor costs.

I figure I'll' be into my engine rebuild $4K. I'll be doing all the labor.

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1 hour ago, keithb7 said:

"Couple of thousand" mentioned for an engine rebuild is not reality today. $2K might get you all the parts needed. Then there's the machining and labor costs.

I figure I'll' be into my engine rebuild $4K. I'll be doing all the labor.

Well damn ... yet another reason for me not to jack with it now.  

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3 hours ago, Sniper said:

I am inherently a lazy person, I would rather do the job right and do it once rather than do it wrong and do it again.

 

 

 

Now wait a minute....who said he did it wrong...besides you? If the engine runs well and he is able to put his '48 on the road reliably and enjoy it with minimal cost then there is nothing wrong with the way he repaired the engine. Matter of fact, for his particular situation...I'd say he did it right!

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On 1/4/2021 at 1:33 AM, sidevalvepete said:

Horses for courses. Wouldn't have been the first time that he has worked on the flathead and probably shows how durable the low compression sidevalve is. Would have been plenty of home mechanics back in the day doing some similar refurbs to keep the wheels on the road. Good to see another old car guy sharing his stuff.

Flip flops crack me up!

boy that woke up a few people in here. I always do engine tear downs with my Crescent wrench. flip flops ? hell yeah... at least get out the spray can and paint the damn thing

Edited by michaelmarks697@yahoo.com
speling
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Wow!

Just like I have fixed them for 47 years! I just wish I was young enough to do another like this guy.

100 percent ambition. 100 percent perspiration. Not 100 percent preparation, however, I give this guy a 100 percent for gitin it done.

Yeeeehaaa  L.O.L.

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