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TodFitch

Ought versus want. . .

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What I want to do is simply replace the missing cotter pin and button things up.

 

Probably what I ought to do is pull all the bearing caps and inspect things. . .

 

Background: Engine was professionally rebuilt about 26,000 miles (and many years) ago. While doing an oil change the other day I did something I don't usually do and don't think I've done since this engine was rebuilt: I felt around inside the pan for things that shouldn't be there. And unfortunately I found something: The remains of a cotter pin. Part of it in the photo, the rest made it to the trash before I thought about documenting it.

 

Don't have a lift, so the car is up on jack stands about as high as I trust them which is barely high enough for me to get under and swing a wrench. Which makes me inclined to spend as little time under there as possible.

 

Anyway, the oil pan is off and everything looks reasonable with the exception of a missing cotter pin on one nut on the #2 connecting rod. The nut is tight and the castellations line up perfectly with the drilled hole in the bolt.

 

I am trying to believe that the cotter pin was improperly installed and came off in the first few miles of running and has been sitting in the pan for years. And I am trying to believe the rod bolt is still torqued properly as indicated by it being tight and the cotter pin hole lining up. If so then installing a new pin and buttoning things up so I can drive to the valley this Saturday would be feasible.

 

Mull this over while I go to the hardware store to get the proper size cotter pins. Might need one or I might need at least a dozen and some plastigage depending on what I decide.

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Tod,

I have had cotter pins break at the bend from metal fatigue when I reuse them. Maybe it was just a bad cotter pin from your mechanic's parts bin. Since the hole and the castellated nut still line up I think it unlikely the torqued nut would loosen just enough to line up on the next gap. What are the odds of that? Oil pressure OK, no new noises? Install one new pin. Then invest your awkward time trying to get the pan back on without introducing any new oil leaks.

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Tod,

I have had cotter pins break at the bend from metal fatigue when I reuse them. Maybe it was just a bad cotter pin from your mechanic's parts bin. Since the hole and the castellated nut still line up I think it unlikely the torqued nut would loosen just enough to line up on the next gap. What are the odds of that? Oil pressure OK, no new noises? Install one new pin. Then invest your awkward time trying to get the pan back on without introducing any new oil leaks.

Yeah, oil pressure is good. No noises.

 

I'll spend tomorrow morning on cleaning all the pieces that came off, oil pan, dust pans, drag link, pitman arm, etc. and mull it over while doing that.

 

Probably will just put it back together and then try to sort out the other issue: Between being parked last November and a few weeks ago it seems to have developed a fuel delivery issue. Got a rebuilt fuel pump and new flex hose on it which helped. Blew compressed are down the line to the tank which helped. Float and needle valve in carburetor appear to be okay and not sticking. But pulling a grade at 60 still causes the engine to miss.

 

After the oil change I was going to take it out and try to get it to miss and then cut the engine off and pull to the side of the road and check the float bowl for proper fuel level to confirm the remaining problem is still actually fuel delivery. Some ignition issues could act the same way. . .

 

This car has been pretty trouble free for the last 15 years, I guess it just wants more attention this year.

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You know you're going to wonder, if you just put it back together. Get the pins, dust off the torque wrench and look at the bearings. They're probably fine, and the worry will be for naught but you'll know.

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You will end up looking at the bearings and one will be slightly different/worn. Then you will start the same question to us all over again except if you should dig deeper.

I would do as most others said. as there are no noises and good oil pressure.

Put it back together and have fun not worries!.

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A cotter pin is strictly a safety device in case the nut loosens. If the nut had backed off 60* to the next slot, it would be just slightly better than finger-tight at the most. So if you cannot loosen it very easily, stick in a new pin and roll on confidently.

 

Now your fuel problem has me curious.

 

Lon

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Went with the "want" (which seemed to be the consensus of replies here) and double checked the torque on that rod and installed a new cotter pin. Engine is back together with no extra or missing nuts, bolts, etc. Test run didn't turn up any new noises and if the oil leaks are worse than before it is not obvious.

 

But the test drive showed that the fuel delivery issue is still there. And it is a fuel delivery issue: When it occurred I cut the engine and pulled over. Popped the air cleaner off and removed the top of the carburetor to see the bowl was nearly empty. Float down, as it should be with low level of fuel and the needle valve fully open as it should be.

 

No evidence of vacuum in the gas tank (filler cap vent blocked). Checked the cam eccentric that drives the fuel pump when the pan was off and there was no sign of wear. Newly rebuilt fuel pump, new flex line, blew the line to the tank with compressed air.

 

I've a full day commitment tomorrow so it looks like I'll not be able figure out what is going wrong and fix it in time to drive out to Clements on Saturday. Oh well.

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Is there a rubber hose anywhere in the fuel system? First thing I'd suspect if there was. They can suck air & spoil your fueling.

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Is there a rubber hose anywhere in the fuel system? First thing I'd suspect if there was. They can suck air & spoil your fueling.

 

x2   The new fuels are very hard on conventional fuel hose. I strongly recommend ptfe hose for the minimal extra cost.

 

Lon

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Is there a rubber hose anywhere in the fuel system? First thing I'd suspect if there was. They can suck air & spoil your fueling.

Yes, and I replaced it with a new hose rated for gasoline when I rebuilt the fuel pump.

 

I'm really guessing now, but it seems that the problem comes on after a few minutes (10 or so) of driving. I am wondering if I've got something floating in the fuel lines somewhere that moves up to an elbow or other restriction and blocks it. Or maybe it is a loose fitting that gets worse when it is being vibrated.

 

What ever it is, there are only a few places it can hide so even if I have to take everything from the tank to the carburetor off it shouldn't take all day to do it. I just didn't have an all day to devote to it once I found the cotter pin fragments in the oil pan. I should have the time tomorrow.

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Have a 1930 Desoto, did the same thing, drive a while and sputter and quit running. After looking everywhere I decided to check the fuel pump. the sediment bowl was full, so I pulled the fuel pump off, disassembled and found that the way

the pump worked was odd and one spring that holds the valve was missing, guess it broke up and who knows where it is? I installed an 6 volt electric pump and cured the problem. electric pumps are good backup in my opinion, 30 Desoto, 48

Plymouth, 49 Buick and 65 Mustang. they are switched and used to refill the cab after shutdown due to the lousy e10 fuel

causing boil out due to the very low boiling point of ethanol.

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