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TodFitch

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  1. TodFitch's post in Trying to find an old Plymouth dealership. was marked as the answer   
    I would be inclined to focus on the location given on the build card. Is it possible that the T&M Garage in Miami, AZ was doing business as Frisco Motors (or vise versa)? If so then there should be some legal record of that either in microfilms of old local newspapers (legal notices) or with the city, county or state (not sure how Arizona deals with "doing business as" paperwork).
     
    Microfilms of old newspapers should also have any car dealer ads. So regardless of the entries in the old business directories if a dealer was using Frisco as a name there ought to be an ad in there.
     
    Copper mining was a big business in Arizona in that era so I would not be surprised if the Miami-Globe area was more populated and wealthy back then that they are now and could support at least one daily newspaper.
  2. TodFitch's post in Trying to find an old Plymouth dealership. was marked as the answer   
    I would be inclined to focus on the location given on the build card. Is it possible that the T&M Garage in Miami, AZ was doing business as Frisco Motors (or vise versa)? If so then there should be some legal record of that either in microfilms of old local newspapers (legal notices) or with the city, county or state (not sure how Arizona deals with "doing business as" paperwork).
     
    Microfilms of old newspapers should also have any car dealer ads. So regardless of the entries in the old business directories if a dealer was using Frisco as a name there ought to be an ad in there.
     
    Copper mining was a big business in Arizona in that era so I would not be surprised if the Miami-Globe area was more populated and wealthy back then that they are now and could support at least one daily newspaper.
  3. TodFitch's post in Remove Plymouth horn button was marked as the answer   
    On the '33 the bezel around the horn button unscrews. Normal right hand thread. May be a bit stiff with age and crud build up in the threads. If you try to pry it off you will crack or chip the bakelite (don’t ask how I know). Disconnecting the battery (or unplugging the horn wire at the connection just before it goes into the bottom of the steering column) is a good idea if you don’t want to wake your neighbors up.
  4. TodFitch's post in 1934 PE Deluxe Dash Knob Question was marked as the answer   
    As noted by @Doug&Deb the main purpose of freewheeling and automatic clutch was to make shifting easier. It wasn’t until 1935 that Plymouth got synchronizers in the transmission. With freewheeling to stop the wheels from spinning the transmission output shaft and automatic clutch to disconnect the transmission input shaft you could move the shift lever from one gear to the next silently without using the clutch even when stationary. If only the freewheeling was engaged (middle position on the cable pull) the you would need to use the clutch for when starting but could shift between gears without clutching or making grinding noises when the car was moving.
     
    The automatic clutches were troublesome and got in the way of servicing other parts of the drivetrain so they usually were removed and discarded. I was able to find one that I was going to install on my car but the control valve mechanism was badly worn (no filter on the vacuum in port and driving on dusty roads would quickly do that). I installed it without hooking it up to the vacuum for show purposes only but it got in the way of other maintenance items so it now resides on a shelf in the garage.
     
    As for freewheeling, it works on my car but I leave it locked out all the time.
     
    If you want to scare the cr*p out of yourself, engage the freewheeling in hilly (or worse mountain) terrain. The tiny little brakes fade pretty quickly, really only good for one panic stop from 50 MPH or higher, and you then remember that to lock out the freewheeling you need to have the engine accelerating the car. Might not be so bad for later cars that had two inch wide brake shoes, but the 1.5 inch wide shoes on the 1933 fade pretty quickly. I think the 1934 still had the 1.5 inch wide shoes. Not sure when the went to 2 inch wide, maybe 1936 or 37.
     
    I still remember the first day on my trip west in 1978 pulling a little utility trailer filled with all my (heavy) spare car parts coming out of the mountains of West Virginia. A long sweeping downhill curve ended at a traffic light which turned red just as it came into view. Normal service brakes were fading, so I gunned it enough to pull the freewheeling control then double clutched down to second, pulled the hand brake and pressed the brake pedal as hard as I could. Just barely stopped in time. And I resolved never to use freewheeling again.
     
    With respect to control cable routing: The cable goes from the dash to a lever on the back of the transmission that controls the freewheeling. Another cable attached to that same lever then went forward to the automatic clutch.
  5. TodFitch's post in Mechanical fuel pump question was marked as the answer   
    Gaskets shouldn’t be too much of a problem, but the diaphragm might be if it hasn’t been rebuilt in the last 20 or so years. Antique Auto Parts Cellar/Then-N-Now Automotive has rebuild kits that have modern materials.
  6. TodFitch's post in 1933 dodge freewheel gearbox was marked as the answer   
    I imagine that places like Faxon Auto Literature would carry the reprints. In the meantime, here is a scan from the '33 DeLuxe Plymouth Instruction Book as I am guessing that the Dodge and Plymouth transmissions are very similar (might even be identical).

  7. TodFitch's post in Yesterdays Engine Compression Loss Thread? was marked as the answer   
    It was deleted. . . There were several reports about it and I went to take a look and it was already deleted by the time I got to it. Not sure which other moderator did the deed.
  8. TodFitch's post in Topic Dead Center/Bottom Dead Center ? was marked as the answer   
    Riffing on Plymouthy's comment: There are basically three throws on the crankshaft at 120° apart. Each throw has two pistons. The pairs of pistons are 1&6, 2&5, and 3&4. So if two of the pistons are at bottom dead center then none of the pistons are at top dead center.
  9. TodFitch's post in Fuel sending unit instal was marked as the answer   
    Do you have a wiring diagram?
     
    I don't have that model or that style fuel gauge system but my understanding is there should be three connections on the dash unit where one connection goes to the ignition switch for power and the other two go to the tank.
     
    If it is the same as the similar era Plymouth, the wire to the ignition should be blue and there should also be a brown wire on that same terminal that goes to the starter switch.
     
    The other two terminals on the gauge should be labeled "1" and "2". A blue wire on #1 goes to the one side of the sender and a black and yellow wire on #2 goes to the other side of the sender.
     
    And, of course, the sender should have a good ground to the frame.
     
    (All the above from the Plymouth service manual as my older car is totally different in this area.)
  10. TodFitch's post in Brake drum was marked as the answer   
    I simply used black enamel on the outside of the drum and nothing on the inside. So far (probably 25 or so years later) most of the black paint is still there. Worn away in spots but mostly there. So I am not sure that special high temperature caliper paint is needed but it can't hurt. The insides of the drums don't have too much rust or dirt as of the last time I checked. Suspect there might be enough grease/lubricant fumes to keep the rust down and the rubbing surface is kept shiny by the shoes.
  11. TodFitch's post in Lost My Axle Keys....help was marked as the answer   
    Looks like they used part number 1118149 from 1936 through at least 1948 for that drive shaft key.
     
    Is that the same one for the P23?
     
    Part 600238 was the number for the '33 Plymouth models which was 5/16" square by 2 1/4" long.
     
    Does anyone have the exact measurements for part 1118149 so I can update the description in my database? (Confirm Andy's 3/8" dimension and supply length.)
     
    Thanks!
  12. TodFitch's post in 1949 Dodge Club Coupe?? was marked as the answer   
    I think Chrysler considered them '48 models, at least by the serial numbers.
     
    But many states set the model year in their records based on sale date back then.
  13. TodFitch's post in Break Fluid Type? was marked as the answer   
    If I recall reading it correctly, DOT5 is less dense than DOT3 and DOT4 which means the DOT5 would be on top.
     
    And that is one of the problems in converting to DOT5 - you will never get all the DOT3 out of the cylinder without disassembling everything as the bleeder is on the top. Apparently the interaction of the DOT3 and DOT5 in the cylinder over time is what causes the problem with the quick and dirty "just swap the fluid" method of converting. And I've read that flushing with denatured alcohol can cause issues with the rubber components...
     
    Basically if you are going to switch fluid types you want to be doing it when you are totally overhauling the brakes and have all the cylinders open... Best time is if/when you are replacing all the components including all of the steel tubing.
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