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RobertKB

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RobertKB last won the day on March 28

RobertKB had the most liked content!

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About RobertKB

  • Birthday 02/26/1949

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada
  • Interests
    1948 Dodge D25 Club Coupe
    1951 Dodge D39 Business Coupe
    1953 Plymouth 4-Door Belvedere (Canadian only model)
  • My Project Cars
    1951 Dodge D39 Business Coupe

Contact Methods

  • Biography
    Mopar fan since four years old.
  • Occupation
    Retired teacher

Converted

  • Location
    Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada
  • Interests
    Old cars, photography, jigsaw puzzles, reading

Recent Profile Visitors

4,051 profile views
  1. That was your original plan in your very first post. I personally don’t like any fuel filter close to the exhaust manifold. Did you check for your missing fuel line in the same location you found your missing oil pressure gauge line?
  2. dpollo beat me to the right answer. The above picture is exactly right. Have fun with the project!
  3. There are no dumb questions, just dumb mistakes due to not asking questions. Now you know how and can pass on that info if needed. Thanks for the update of the successful replacement. A lot of times original posters don’t show appreciation or provide follow up.
  4. Why even think about re-inventing the wheel. Chrysler made tens of millions of these engines. If there was a problem, which I doubt, Chrysler would have made alterations. My ‘53 Plymouth has 102,000+ miles. It had rings, one burnt valve replaced, and the rest lapped 30,000 miles ago. Main and rod bearings were plastique gauged at the time and were in the middle of factory specs so were re-used. The bearings, camshaft, pistons are all original. Only things replaced were the rings. To this day the car does not burn oil, has great compression, and great oil pressure. Just saying, don’t over-think things and have faith in the great engineers who designed these engines.
  5. First, glad the baby’s well as that’s most important! Boy or girl? Second, nice to see the Meadowbrook back in the land of the living.
  6. For the amount of miles you’ll put on the car, go with what’s easy to get and reasonably priced. With modern oils almost any rings will most likely do 100,000+ miles easily. No need to overthink things.
  7. Have the eBay one checked first. Seller may say it needs a recore but then again maybe not.
  8. This doesn’t help Marc but just an observation. In Canada since mid 1938, all cars had the longer 25” engine. It not only makes finding an engine, if needed, easy but radiators are pretty much a universal fit between Mopar brands. I ran a radiator in my ‘48 Dodge coupe for years from a Chrysler. When it finally gave up the ghost I put in a great radiator from a Plymouth. Both bolted right in. I am running a 251 CID in the Dodge from an old grain truck and both radiators have cooled well.
  9. In your first picture it looks like there’s a parts number on the back of the radiator, top right.
  10. If you don’t have the ability or tools needed, a decent radiator shop will run solder around that in a matter of minutes.
  11. Nope, runs all summer!🤪
  12. Took the ‘48 Dodge D25 Club Coupe to the car wash. A bit difficult getting in and out but car is clean!🤪
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