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48mirage

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Everything posted by 48mirage

  1. 48mirage

    Outbound

    I would like to thank the forum and those who have contributed to its success for the nearly 10 years I've been coming here. You folks have entertained me, helped me and inspired me with your work and ideas. Today I sold my '49 Dodge Coronet and am moving on to other projects. It has been fun. I am also encouraging the new owner Chris Coy to join your group. He has never done Mopar and he will need some help with some things, maybe even some ideas on how to undo what I have done. Thank You, Jim Graham
  2. I run a holley 94 on my 230 motor. That particular holley didn't like the pressure from the OEM pump. I went down to the local parts store and got a pressure regulator (Mr. Gasket, I think) and dilaed it down to 2.5 psi. Works great now.
  3. I've seen this list several times before. I find it interesting that there is a gap from 1949 to 1961.
  4. Jim, You use the term VIN to describe the tag on the door jamb. That is not the VIN, Mother Mopar called that the body number. As posted elsewhere I would take a look at the drivers side frame rail just before the rear axle. That is the true identification of the vehicle.
  5. 48mirage

    Hit and Run

    http://www.taillightking.com/50-59Chrysler.htm
  6. I'm not aware of the '49 Coronet coming out with a Carter. This is going to be a fluid drive care either with a 3 speed or a gyromatic transmission. The 3 speed would use a Stromberg BXVD-3 if it has the gyromatic it has the BXVES.
  7. Here is a good source for several different situations. http://www.imperialclub.com/Repair/Lit/Master/index.htm
  8. BlueSkys posted this link when he changed his Plymouth over to a modern driveline. http://www.drive-lines.com/catalogs/pdf/dana/J300P-2.pdf
  9. The V8 swap has ben done. I would like to see someone take one of the new V-6's with the 8? speed auto. From what I've been able to find out is that the block is actually a little shorter than our flatheads and it may be easier to massage into the narrow confines because the exhaust manifold is part of the head.
  10. One thing I learned about Scarebird's stuff is that they do there builds based on NAPA parts. I don't know if that would make much difference but there you are.
  11. Several years ago I bought one of the $15.00 adaptors and didn't like the fit for what I was going to do and had it copied and cut from a piece of billet aluminum. I had the throats for the 2 barrel carb machined larger to accommodate the Holley 94 2110 EEC I installed on my '49 Coronet. This carb came from a 56 Ford Mainline or Fairlane with the 272 V8 with an automatic. I chose this carb because it had the dashpot I needed for the fluid drive. It also had an automatic choke. The choke was not electric but was activated with a heat tube. I picked up the exhaust manifold from a '54 Plymouth with this setup and put a second outlet on it. I did not separate the halves but I did leave the heat valve in it. This really woke up the ol' girl. She's got 98,000 miles on her. I don't drive it everyday but if it's too wet or cold to ride I drive the Coronet. To connect the carb to the existing linkage I only had to screw in last linkage a little bit. I also added a fuel pressure regulator to get it down to the 2 1/2 pound range. Without the regulator the fuel pump was pushing too much fuel and I couldn't slow the idle down enough.
  12. Most of the electron flow is along the outside of the wire. (Study large busses in substations, hint they are hollow) But, we are talking about small amp loads in our cars the reason for the stranded wires goes back to the flexibility and the solid wire being work hardened and breaking. For another variation marine grade wire is tinned before the insulation is applied to prevent corrosion of the copper.
  13. I don't have a convertible, but I found it easiest to run both pipes next to each other and they exit together where the original did.
  14. Link, cowl vent lid upper 1248 835 and 1299 564 mechanism 1248 957 knob 1299 815 There are some specialty bolts that hold the pieces together. The parts book says 49 and 50 are the same will a '54 work? Don't know wouldn't want to guess anything but no.
  15. All 49 and 50 Dodges would be the same for the mechanism it appears even at least some of the Plymouth parts from '49 and '50 are the same.
  16. http://www.imperialclub.com/Repair/Lit/Master/023/Cover.htm
  17. The element in the Stromberg that you are looking for is the dashpot. It slows the closing of the carb when you take your foot off the gas. According to my parts book it was the same carb from '49 to '52. D29, D30, D33, D34, D41 and D42. It will be stamped 3-90. The original part number was 1312 120
  18. Click on the resources tab at the top of the page for a starter. The 2 best tools you will have is the service manual and the parts book. Both are available as a cd and hardcover. I found mine on ebay. If you have something in particular that you are looking for, ask. Many of us have our own favorites.
  19. I've used a latching solenoid to isolate my battery. I had a switch under the dash to operate it.
  20. https://www.yahoo.com/autos/take-a-trip-through-the-c1437409661278/photo-classic-car-junkyard-photo-1437409360737.html
  21. Your service manual when it arrives should have your wiring diagram with wire sizes and colors. If you use the original sizes you will have plenty of safety margin for the 12 volt conversion. Pulley size for an alternator? You want a small one that will fit the width of belt you are using. Here is a seller I have used before and some of his options. There are other sellers out there so there is no endorsement of anyone. You will want to use a smaller diameter than stock for the pulley. Some of these systems the alternator doesn't start making until up to a certain rpm. With our slow idling flatheads you will want the alternator to spin up sooner.
  22. You say you got the engine from the H.A.M.B.? Is the seller still posting there. He may reply if he is embarrassed where he hangs out.
  23. You may find the 10 amp voltage reducer is a little small. It is big enough to operate but it is the starting amps that may cause you a problem. The folks at www.Koolcars.us sell some larger ones. Another and probably better option is to go to a 12 volt fan motor. The original thread is gone but you might do a search for NAPA 655-1022. There is a thread about it working in a 47 Plymouth and I used the same in my 49 Dodge.
  24. I remember having the same problem. My solution was to go with a different carb, but I had a different path for my engine. I would first check and see what hole on the accelerator pump arm the carb is set for and adjust that first. It just may need more or less gas when you hit the accelerator.
  25. http://p15-d24.com/topic/27274-voltage-reducers-for-heaterblower-fans/?p=286083
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