Jump to content

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/22/2019 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    cavisco1

    Head Bolt Thread Sealant

    Try Permatex High Performance Thread Sealant pn 56521 on fasteners that penetrate the water jacket. I had good success using this on a timing cover bolt that penetrated into the water jacket on a 3800 v6. I had previously tried some of the silicone products without success, but the permatex thread sealant did the trick.
  2. 2 points
    wayfarer

    354 Hemi

    "nothing has been done" "ran about 30 years ago" "needs to be sleeved" ...the very first thing that you need to do is sonic check the cylinder walls for thickness. ...the very first. The internet is full of keyboard experts who regurgitate everything they hear, whether fact or fiction, and the amount of allowable overbore is a favorite subject. Having played with these old things for the better part of four decades I can state that I have found no constant, every block varies and until you know how much wall you have you do not 'know' what you will be able to do with it.
  3. 1 point
    T120

    New Car Day! 1938 P6 Plymouth Deluxe

    Small world, Possibly the same Murray Noel that lived in Saanich, B.C. on Vancouver Island and graduated from the same High School as I did around that time..
  4. 1 point
  5. 1 point
    I purchased a P15 off of another forum member, mostly because it needed just some TLC to make it driveable and it more or less was similar to the Pilothouse pickup I am putting together in terms of drivetrain. What follows is not an exact recipe, but its what I have been driving (I did 300 miles round trip last Friday, biggest trip to date, but it took me most of the winter to get everything happy) A good compression engine - in this case its a 251 Desoto rebuilt in modern times Dual carbs and dual exhaust - not needed - but it adds some ponies for interstate driving - this car has modified factory manifolds to accomplish this (Full disclaimer - it also has dual points, camshaft, etc.... ) An overdrive transmission - good for interstate speeds - I can easily run 80mph down the interstate at roughly 2500rpms - T5 is in the P15, and also what I plan on for the Pilothouse A "modern" rear axle - cheap way of getting better gearing - its often cheaper to get a "modern" rear axle than to get the correct gears for your OEM axle - in the P15 its out of a Dodge Charger, my Pilothouse will have an 8.8 Ford with the added benefit of it having disc brakes out back. Radial tires - put a good set of radials on it. Disc brakes up front - I like the reduced stopping distance and readily available over the counter parts if needed on the road. Dual chamber master cylinder - having separate front and rear circuits add a bit of protection if you have an issue out on the road. The P15 also has an aluminum radiator - much more efficient than the old stock unit New wiring - a generic harness kit is cheap if you aren't looking for factory exact. Turn signals - I have LED turns front and rear - I will probably also wire in some daytime running lights as people just don't seem to see or pay attention to anything anymore and extra lighting can't hurt. 12V - using a common 1 wire GM alternator makes finding one on the shelf of a parts house while on the road an almost guarantee. Again - this isn't a recipe, just an outline of what I have been driving. I have nearly 800 miles on it total so far this year and will probably put 4 thousand or so miles on it before winter. I have a college class reunion coming up this summer in upstate New York that I am thinking of driving up to in the P15 - that will be an easy 1200 mile round trip before its said and done if my schedule works out. Good luck - there is lots to look at and consider.
  6. 1 point
    Just noticed this thread on the AACA web site: https://forums.aaca.org/topic/327261-high-compression-head-for-28-std-six/ The car owner wanted a higher compression head but wanted to be able to return the car to totally stock in the future. So that ruled out milling the original head. If I read the follow on correctly, he did the milling on an old non-CNC machine so I guess he is pretty talented.
  7. 1 point
    Adam H P15 D30

    Defrost heater duct

    I use large cable ties when I install Vintage Air systems. Tape always seems to come off and a worm clamp might be hard to access??
  8. 1 point
    keithb7

    Bulletproof a 1954 Plymouth Savoy

    A well maintained old Mopar, in my opinion is pretty bulletproof. Whether its 1934 or 1954. Me? I’d likely go through everything, top to bottom. All the original wear and salvage specs are available. Put everything back to spec. Points and condenser need not be updated to solid state. A strong powertrain throughout. Top notch electrical system. Good Tires and brakes in top condition. It can look old and tired, yet be a solid reliable car. Best be sure to educate yourself and get dirty. Car owner mechanical experience, skill and confidence goes a long way here. Yes you can pay others to do everything. It’ll cost a ton. When/if the car does let you down you may find yourself stumped and waiting for a tow truck. That’s my experience.
  9. 1 point
    dpollo

    New Car Day! 1938 P6 Plymouth Deluxe

    I recognize the car. For over 40 years, it belonged to a fellow named Murray Noel who owned it from about 1960 to fairly recently when he reluctantly sold it because he can no longer drive. I also know who installed the newer engine ( many years ago) and I believe he used a Chevrolet truck radiator. I will pass the word down the line that the car now has a good home, Murray thought that it would likely be resold after it was put back in running condition. Should you decide to re install the original engine I have a cylinder head. and a radiator. In the meanwhile, enjoy it the way it is. Seems to me the upholstery needed attention, If you want more info, you may send me a PM.
  10. 1 point
    Any other Plymouth Deluxe owners in the area? Just bought my `46 Plymouth Deluxe on Saturday.. found some switches not sure what they do etc.. anyone around (NH) have one of these i can bounce questions off of or compare side by side the cars?
  11. 1 point
    I don't know what I have in various vehicle distributors, but a CS725A Napa looks right for my 49 P15 First Edition.
  12. 1 point
    Just sucks a little oil on long decels. After reading through all these it might just be a flaw in my design but the draft tube rarely dripped oil, who knows. Also the breather on the drivers side seems to be doing more “breathing” during a long freeway drive at speed. ~70 mph. Never did this before the PCV mod. Compression is good, fairly fresh rebuild.
  13. 1 point
    Dodgeb4ya

    Tags

    Could be the job #
  14. 1 point
    thebeebe5

    Torque Specs on Cam and Cam Timing Gear

    https://www.almabolt.com/pages/catalog/bolts/tighteningtorque.ht Think I torqued mine to 18lb/ft. I don’t recall a torque spec in the book either, but torque specs should hold from application to application. Just follow a torque schedule like the above.
  15. 1 point
    Reg Evans

    Nostalgia or what

    My first set of wheels was home made by me in 1959 when I was 11. Then when I was 16 I spotted this car in a field and the shape still appealed to me.
  16. 1 point
    keithb7

    Nostalgia or what

    I attended vintage car show in Vegas a few years ago. I felt the time was right to get into the vintage car scene. I’ve always loved old cars. My kids were now grown up. It was time to start looking. Originally I wanted post-WW2 type. I like the design. I found a really clean 1953 Chrysler. Lots of chrome. Good price! I bit, and went for it. I’ve been really enjoying it. The whole plan worked out well. As you can see, I did not have a certain car in mind. I was attracted to its looks, price and nostalgia I guess. With one car being so fun, only way to have more fun is two cars. Right? I have been looking at other vintage car options for probably the past 6-8 months. Several options caught my attention. They never worked out for various reasons. Then, another Mopar struck me. Everything felt right and the deal fell together nicely. Pre WW2 this time. It seemed like the right fit for me. I bought it. So that’s two old cars in a row for me with no real significance. I have no idea if my Grandparents had one of either car or not. The way I see it....These cars will be of considerable significance to my sons or potential further offspring! If I’m lucky.
  17. 1 point
    I make it a habit to record the original and current part numbers on anything like that. Then the next time I need that part I don't have to pull anything first. And sometimes you'll find years later that people can no longer cross the original part number but they can still cross the "current" number you found before. If/when I need tune up parts for my '33, I simply look at my notes to get the current part numbers. I call the local auto supply in the morning and pick them up in the afternoon after their warehouse delivery occurs.
  18. 1 point
    jpwuertz

    Dodges are ready for summer

    I got the Dodges ready for the Minnesota summer season. The B3B started right up and was ready to go. The brakes were a bit sticky after setting all winter but after warming them up they are OK. The 1969 Dodge Dart Swinger is all original, except for the rims, and also started right up. It has a 318 engine. This was my aunt's car who lived in CA and therefor it has no rust.
  19. 1 point
    Dodgeb4ya

    Putting the engine back together

    This is a typical picture of a machine shop hot tank cleaning of a Mopar oil pick up...they dont remove the tin cover to fully clean it...I always do... This one I had to R&R the screen ....re-crimp it... a hard thing to do right. Definitely check all machine shop cleaning of all oil passages! Leave No debris anywhere...
  20. 1 point
    knuckleharley

    1952 Dodge Coupe hot rod

    Can't speak for anyone else,but I like your plan. Especially the ohv inline 6 Jeep engine.
  21. 1 point


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.

Terms of Use