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Sam Buchanan

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Sam Buchanan last won the day on January 18

Sam Buchanan had the most liked content!

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  • Location
    North Alabama
  • Interests
    custom-built aircraft and boats
  • My Project Cars
    1948 Plymouth Special Deluxe
    1974 Triumph TR6

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  • Location
    north Alabama
  • Interests
    custom-built aircraft

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  1. Buy the Chrysler line if it fits the fitting on your gauge, cut the engine end off so the line is the correct length and flare it for the flex line.
  2. Just to close the loop, here is my montage in a 16x20 frame. I like! I can email this file if anyone wants it, it is sized to print correctly on a Staples 18x24 poster print.
  3. A little time in Photoshop and an 18x24 poster has been ordered from Staples.
  4. These are awesome, thanks for sharing! What is the highest resolution scan you have? I would love to print a couple of these for my office.
  5. The Mustang conversion would be cool, then since the front of the car is modern might as well bring the rear up-to-date with a modern disc-brake axle. Since the modern axle can handle a lot more power than the old Mopar piece, and there is now a Mustang front end on the car, it would be a shame not to drop a small-block Chevy in the hole with a modern automatic transmission. Of course the steering column needs to be replaced with a tilt unit so it looks better with the Vintage AC system and Toyota bucket seats. Now you can really utilize your 'old' Mopar! 🤣 Or......you could just install a disc kit and enjoy your vintage driver. 😁 The above scenario is what we call "mission creep". It occurs when we don't establish what we really want from the car and stick with that framework. We see it all the time in the custom-built aircraft community, the basic set of avionics ends up being $70K..........and rarely gets used to its full potential. But I respect everyone's right to decide what they want to do.
  6. Ok...a classic 'apples to oranges' thing going on here that really has no relevance to installing modern disc brakes on our old Mopars. Thank you for the clarification.
  7. Uncle Tony may be a smart internet guy (I'm not familiar with him) but I don't know why he would say a disc conversion isn't as good as the original brakes unless he is referring to some sort of cobbled together conversion. No fading, no maintenance for the lifetime of the car (we'll never drive these things enough to wear out the pads and rotor), no adjusting and modern wheel studs. That is not as good as the old drums??? Interesting...
  8. I wonder if all those batteries (five batteries in one year??) are actually ruined. It looks like you are using a "smart" charger that requires the battery to have some amount of voltage before it will begin charging. If the battery has been run down all the way the charger will indicate a faulty battery. You will then need to put a "dumb" charger on the battery to bring it back up to voltage so the smart charger will work properly. I also wonder if the charging system on your car is faulty and not charging the battery. In that case you are storing a battery in a depleted state and it doesn't take long for it to go flat. A voltmeter across the battery terminals when the car is running will indicate ~7.5v if the battery is being charged properly. I have never needed to disconnect the battery between drives, the battery stays connected all the time--I will put the smart charger on it maybe once to bring it back to full charge in the winter when temps in the garage drop.
  9. If the only problem is they're too tall you could cut a section out of the vertical legs (use a diagonal cut) then glue them to the covers. A little extra sealer in the joint should make it good. Or buy another set.
  10. I perused the P15 Service Manual for torque values and locations for the exhaust/intake manifold nuts and the only thing I found was in the Engine section where it stated 15-20 ft/lbs for manifold stud nuts. There are three types of nuts and washers used in this application, some brass and some locking steel. The illustration below may offer insight to their proper placement. However, if only the outboard studs get the spherical washers and self-locking nuts but all the nuts are torqued to the same value what is the purpose of the special washers and nuts? I assume the concern was expansion changing the length of the exhaust manifold due to heat cycles but how do the special washers accommodate that change? Is 15-20 ft/lbs loose enough to allow the manifold to "slide" under the washer but still tight enough to seal properly? Beats me. Hopefully someone can offer more background details. The image below, which looks like it is from a truck manual, shows the spherical washers and steel lock nuts located on the four outboard studs.
  11. Hmmmm.....I perused the Service Manual for torque values and the only thing I found was in the Engine section where it stated 15-20 ft/lbs for manifold stud nuts. If only the outboard studs get the spherical washers and self-locking nuts but all the nuts are torqued to the same value what is the purpose of the special washers and nuts? I assumed the concern was the length of the exhaust manifold changing due to heat cycles but how do the special washers accommodate that change? Is 15-20 ft/lbs loose enough to allow the manifold to "slide" under the washer? Beats me, maybe someone can offer more background details. The image below is from the thread Sniper referenced, looks like it is from a truck manual. This probably needs to be in a separate thread. I'll start one.
  12. For clarification, do these specialized washers and nuts go on the four outboard studs or the four studs that are common to both the intake and exhaust manifolds? The common studs would make more sense to me but...........
  13. Since you asked so politely 😆 I stepped out to the shop and grabbed this pic, tranny in neutral, please excuse the gunk, that is the anti-corrosion system:
  14. Good reason to have a fuel shut-off valve on our small engines.......
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