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Bob Riding

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Bob Riding last won the day on November 29 2020

Bob Riding had the most liked content!

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About Bob Riding

  • Rank
    Senior Member, have way too much spare time on my hands

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Sanger, CA
  • Interests
    Vintage cars, fishing, camping, history, film, travel.
  • My Project Cars
    1940 Plymouth Suburban
    1952 Plymouth Suburban
    1954 Chrysler T&C wagon
    1956 Plymouth Suburban

Contact Methods

  • Biography
    Grandfather, married 41 years (to the same woman), have 2 grown boys
  • Occupation
    Retired from a major electric and gas utility company

Converted

  • Location
    Central California
  • Interests
    Old cars-have 6 Mopars (2 Dodge B1Bs), 5 Plymouths from '40-'51

Recent Profile Visitors

2,379 profile views
  1. very interesting info. Maybe a metallurgist in the group will weigh in?
  2. I assume you didn't try to reinstall?
  3. Came out pretty good. I was able to squeeze some grease into them with my new spring cover tool. No squeaks!
  4. I think the stock look can't really be improved on, however "modern" upgrades can make it more enjoyable to drive. Things I have done to my 1940 Dodge and 1940 Plymouth wagon: radial tires front disc brakes turn signals dual carbs with dual exhaust RadioRad for modern tunes larger displacement flathead overdrive passenger side mirror upgraded rearend (from 4:10 to 3:73) HEI distributor front shock relocation Things that I plan to do on my current build (1952 Plymouth Suburban): 12 volt electrics Automatic transm
  5. Decided to keep the gaiters (leaf spring covers) Purchased the spring cover lube tool on eBay, like Desoto39 suggested on eBay for $10. I'm cleaning them up and will be painting them black and silver (Mopar colors). The toughest part was pressing out the silent blocks - finally found my old ball joint press and with a little fabrication, was able to press them out. Success!
  6. me too. Although the covers seem to be a thinner galvanized material, pretty flexible.
  7. I found two holes on each cover- one on each side. I assume that the tool doesn't make the holes, but uses the factory locations. I will check on bBay. Thanks!
  8. Makes sense. I wonder if they also function as spring clamps? I don't see any, unless they are underneath.
  9. I'm working on the rear suspension and would like to keep the leaf spring covers, if possible. It also saves a boatload of work, disassembling , cleaning, repainting etc., if it's not really necessary. I'm replacing the silent block and bushings. The covers look to be in good shape - it's a CA car so minimal rust, but I've heard that over time the covers could trap water and cause squeaks, corrosion and other bad things. Thoughts?
  10. Good question. I am using a rebuilt GM 200 4R, that I bought a few years ago to use with the P20 motor that I was planning to use in the Suburban. An all-Mopar build would have been cool, though. I also have the Wilcap adapter to connect the two. I know- it's a bit of a mixed marriage
  11. Thanks for the suggestions. I think it's wise to set up the motor with the existing intake and either an Edelbrock or TQ carb and see how I like it. No need to spend the Christmas account down unnecessarily on go-fast gewgaws ...yet. I will post progress pictures. Next is to mock it up and install motor mounts.:)
  12. I just scored a rebuilt small block Mopar 360 V8 for my '52 Suburban project. Sold the P20 to a fellow Plymouth owner who needed it for his woodie, so I can now concentrate on mocking up the engine, steering, etc. Since I am a novice regarding V8's and have only worked with flathead 6s for all my projects, I would appreciate the wisdom of our crowd. As a start, my brother-in-law, who used to have a car restoration business in Clovis, suggested replacing the stock cast-iron intake with an aluminum one and install a Holly or Weber 4bbl carb. I will not be racing the wagon- it's got 3:73 gears an
  13. Lots to ponder. Thanks for the expert advice!
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