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Rear fender information


mikes48
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I've never found any on ones I've taken off.  Doesn't mean there was and it's rotted away.   I DO know there is nothign sitting proud of the joint (NO LOLIPOP).  I used body caulk to seal that area up and keep it all hidden.  Worked great, 8 years after the resto I had to pull a fender for some paint repair on the exterior of the fender..

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There was nothing proud of the seam on mine either, but there was some form of gasket material "welting"

I used a heat gun to soften it up & a scraper to remove it. .... It was pretty uniform in width & thickness, making me believe it was a gasket of sorts & not caulk.

 

I imagine its purpose was to prevent squeaks & rattles.

I have been thinking about going to a local truck tire repair shop in search of old inner tubes to be thrown away. Make a gasket from that.

Seam sealer does sound like a good idea also.

 

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Yah, anti-squeek and such makes sense.  I can see rotted away or removed from a prior repair maybe?  Like I said, I only know what I have seen directly.  I'd avoid seam sealer....JIC you have to pull the fender.  Inner tubes or sections from a piece of flat sheet would work.  I know this same issue is on the front clip, where I have sections remaining from a tear down, but no complete pieces.  I plan on sectioned flat sheet peices there for TODD.  The body caulk worked(s) well IMO.

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7 hours ago, Los_Control said:

There was nothing proud of the seam on mine either, but there was some form of gasket material "welting"

I used a heat gun to soften it up & a scraper to remove it. .... It was pretty uniform in width & thickness, making me believe it was a gasket of sorts & not caulk.

 

I imagine its purpose was to prevent squeaks & rattles.

I have been thinking about going to a local truck tire repair shop in search of old inner tubes to be thrown away. Make a gasket from that.

Seam sealer does sound like a good idea also.

 

Same thing I found on my 56.    .  My original plan was seam sealer, but Now it looks like the best thing easily available is the foil backed tar-like flashing materials.  Just cut a strip and stick the sticky side to the fender, punch the bolt holes and install. 

Edited by kencombs
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Just now, kencombs said:

Now it looks like the best thing easily available is the foil backed tar-like flashing materials. 

I would be interested in looking at some of that .... My thought with the inner tube, they are already formed in a circle & easy to cut with a pair of scissors.

You would want to use some sort of contact glue or sealer to glue one side of it to the fender .... easier to install.

Tire shops will install new tubes with new tires .... The used ones are often sold cheap as "swim tubes" The ones that will not hold air are thrown away.

I personally would like to have some of that rubber material around for many different uses ... just have it available. .... I would use it as a fender gasket.

 

5 hours ago, ggdad1951 said:

I'd avoid seam sealer....

I have never used seam sealer before ... I bought some to seal up the floor in my cab after I weld it in, I have other ideas of where I might use it.

@ggdad1951 mentioned using body caulk, I just assumed they were the same product.

Maybe seam sealer is not a good idea to use as a gasket?

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11 hours ago, Los_Control said:

I have never used seam sealer before ... I bought some to seal up the floor in my cab after I weld it in, I have other ideas of where I might use it.

@ggdad1951 mentioned using body caulk, I just assumed they were the same product.

Maybe seam sealer is not a good idea to use as a gasket?

 

To me seam sealer is an adhesive.  Used to fill gaps on body work where you never PLAN to take apart.  Places like sems in bed boxes, seams on firewalls, etc.  I'd never use it in a place where I MIGHT have to remove a panel for repair.  I think of it as a "permanent" solution.image.png.8f624c912a37987b01912f7e3de0ea9c.png

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A possible suggestion on welting; in the Volkswagen air-cooled world they sell rolls for fender installation.  Two basic versions, the fancier stuff with bolt holes pre-notched, or the cheaper stuff as just a roll that you notch yourself.

 

An example:

https://www.chirco.com/classic-vw-bug-beetle-black-fender-beading-fender-welt-all-years/

 

Like the previously mentioned inner tube or flat stock options, it's just held in place by compression, the fender bolted to the bed side.

 

Just my ¢¢.

 

Best,

MBSoPaB

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12 hours ago, MBSoPaB said:

A possible suggestion on welting; in the Volkswagen air-cooled world they sell rolls for fender installation.  Two basic versions, the fancier stuff with bolt holes pre-notched, or the cheaper stuff as just a roll that you notch yourself.

 

An example:

https://www.chirco.com/classic-vw-bug-beetle-black-fender-beading-fender-welt-all-years/

 

Like the previously mentioned inner tube or flat stock options, it's just held in place by compression, the fender bolted to the bed side.

 

Just my ¢¢.

 

Best,

MBSoPaB

 

Stuff looks like a "lillipop" design?

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Lollipop cross section is pretty accurate!

On the Bugs I've used it on, the head of the lollipop, or bead, lays a bit to one side as it is fitted between the panels.  Like the letter P (or d or b, if that's the way you roll).

The upholstery world opens up an even bigger can of worms/possibilities, with canvas or vinyl piping, varied colors and varied bead thicknesses.

 

So many choices!

 

Best,

MBSoPaB

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