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1942 ifs suspension upgrade


Goathead
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so I'm looking for more info or some photos of other cars that have had like a mustang II style font supension swap i want to up grade since i am putting a new style motor and trans into so i can actully drive the car and use as a daily if needed i have a 42 d22 coupe any info would be greatly appreicaded.   

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major involvement to do this correctly as you will need to also change the front frame rails to set the MII style IFS in place....even doing your own work, it will be costly as it seems you may be looking for a cut and weld by number kit, fabricator would already be down to prepped stubs by now.....sub-framing is best in my opinion IF your mind is set on modern.......but there are pros and cons sub framing also....do read a bit....find the manner you wish to proceed then ask the builder for a tip or two...these are archived here with a search of the forum.  Many upgrade the current IFS with R&P, disc brakes and shock relocation, quick and easy.

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I was going to suggest you check out Fatman Fabrications for one of the replacement MII stub frame weld in front sections that are made for many older cars, yours included.

 

Checked just now and wow the price is double what I paid for one for my 1950 Plymouth about 10 years ago. From $800 to now $1750 plus ship and a pallet fee of $75!!

 

Now you would just need to weld it in with their instructions and then purchase the MII suspension parts -  $2000 ??   Afraid to look!

 

Man if you can design and weld  then build your own  from raw steel stock purchased locally.  Maybe some local talent in your area could do it for you.??

 

DJ

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5 hours ago, Goathead said:

so I'm looking for more info or some photos of other cars that have had like a mustang II style font supension swap i want to up grade since i am putting a new style motor and trans into so i can actully drive the car and use as a daily if needed i have a 42 d22 coupe any info would be greatly appreicaded.   

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Just now, knuckleharley said:
5 hours ago, Goathead said:

so I'm looking for more info or some photos of other cars that have had like a mustang II style font supension swap i want to up grade since i am putting a new style motor and trans into so i can actully drive the car and use as a daily if needed i have a 42 d22 coupe any info would be greatly appreicaded.   

My opinion,and worth every nickel it costs you,is to rebuild your stock front suspension with new springs,new shocks,etc,etc,etc.

 

The truth is you are not going to go road racing with the 42 coupe,so you really don't need suspension upgrades if all you are going to to is drive it and enjoy it. 

 

Maybe add front disc brakes and upgrade the shocks using modern ones instead of factory standard all around,but that is all I would do to the suspension.

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On 7/30/2022 at 10:31 AM, Goathead said:

so I'm looking for more info or some photos of other cars that have had like a mustang II style font supension swap i want to up grade since i am putting a new style motor and trans into so i can actully drive the car and use as a daily if needed i have a 42 d22 coupe any info would be greatly appreicaded.   

Below is a list of the last 5 cars I built with IFS and my thoughts on each one.  Maybe it will help you with your decision

1.  1947 Ford - Used a Volare clip - Probably the second best driving car I have!  It rides excellent, handles well, good brakes, adjustable ride height.

     Cons: It has a massive steering box in a difficult place to deal with.  If you can deal with that, good choice because you wont have to hack off your front frame to do it.

     Put about 80k on that car including multiple trips from California to Kentucky for the NSRA nats.  I think an aftermarket company is making a smaller box now?

2.  1935 Ford - Used a TCI Mustang II kit with tubular control arms.  No need to cut the frame on the Fords. 

     Cons: Doesn't ride nearly as well as above and the steering is twitchy and I would give it a B-, but hey, it looks good.  Don't drive this one as much but not because of the ride.

3.  1947 Plymouth coupe - Used a 2nd generation Camaro clip.  Had to modify the radiator support to fit the steering box.  Rides good and handles extremely well especially when you add the quick ratio steering box.  Not twitchy at all like rack and pinion.

     Cons: It's too wide!  I had to buy the Fatman narrow control arms to avoid buying silly looking wheels but that = $$$$$$

4.  1956 Ford Panel truck - Again Mustang II but I used the welders series this time (same geometry)  Rides better than the 35 and steering is a little less twitchy probably because it is heavier and longer.

5. 1949 Dodge - (My profile picture) Stock suspension with a Rusty Hope disc brake kit, no shock relocation, 1 coil cut.  I drive this car a lot! Rain or shine!  It doesn't even get a garage.  On the road, this car rides the best BY FAR.  It even handles acceptably, it's still a king pin suspension.  I only wish it had power steering but that's only an issue when stopped and I am not as young as I once was.  I will never put a rack and pinion in it because I prefer how steering box cars drive.

 

Some time back a member here put a ?Mustang? power steering box in and it didn't require a ton of fab work.  Best of all, our quirky pitman arm fit the sector.  I would search for that thread but it was a long time ago.

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32 minutes ago, Adam H P15 D30 said:

Below is a list of the last 5 cars I built with IFS and my thoughts on each one.  Maybe it will help you with your decision

1.  1947 Ford - Used a Volare clip - Probably the second best driving car I have!  It rides excellent, handles well, good brakes, adjustable ride height.

     Cons: It has a massive steering box in a difficult place to deal with.  If you can deal with that, good choice because you wont have to hack off your front frame to do it.

     Put about 80k on that car including multiple trips from California to Kentucky for the NSRA nats.  I think an aftermarket company is making a smaller box now?

2.  1935 Ford - Used a TCI Mustang II kit with tubular control arms.  No need to cut the frame on the Fords. 

     Cons: Doesn't ride nearly as well as above and the steering is twitchy and I would give it a B-, but hey, it looks good.  Don't drive this one as much but not because of the ride.

3.  1947 Plymouth coupe - Used a 2nd generation Camaro clip.  Had to modify the radiator support to fit the steering box.  Rides good and handles extremely well especially when you add the quick ratio steering box.  Not twitchy at all like rack and pinion.

     Cons: It's too wide!  I had to buy the Fatman narrow control arms to avoid buying silly looking wheels but that = $$$$$$

4.  1956 Ford Panel truck - Again Mustang II but I used the welders series this time (same geometry)  Rides better than the 35 and steering is a little less twitchy probably because it is heavier and longer.

5. 1949 Dodge - (My profile picture) Stock suspension with a Rusty Hope disc brake kit, no shock relocation, 1 coil cut.  I drive this car a lot! Rain or shine!  It doesn't even get a garage.  On the road, this car rides the best BY FAR.  It even handles acceptably, it's still a king pin suspension.  I only wish it had power steering but that's only an issue when stopped and I am not as young as I once was.  I will never put a rack and pinion in it because I prefer how steering box cars drive.

 

Some time back a member here put a ?Mustang? power steering box in and it didn't require a ton of fab work.  Best of all, our quirky pitman arm fit the sector.  I would search for that thread but it was a long time ago.

#5 warms my heart!   I've been watching the thread but didn't post because it would have sounded argumentative without your post.

 

The Mopar suspension science is/was just about as good as they come.    Kingpin vs ball joints is mostly a cost thing.  Lots fewer parts and assembly time with ball joints.  And grease points for owners to overlook!

 

That is also the major justification for R&P.  Much simpler and easier to build a nice driving car.  Recirculating ball is better IMHO, but requires a greater degree of precision manufacturing to get there.  Think about this:  back in the day no parts store had rebuilt steering gear in stock or even warehoused.  Today R&P replacement is a big business.

 

Bigger drum brakes or disk upgrade, replace parts as needed to remove slack, change springs for ride height adjustment as needed, good shocks and drive it is my recommendation, FWIW.

 

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3 hours ago, DonaldSmith said:

I put a Saginaw power steering box in my 47 DeSoto.  Steering column alterations, but no suspension changes.  Today I would look into electric power steering. 

Electric power steering is in MY opinion,the way to go if you want or need PS.

 

Was going to use it in my 37 Dodge 1.5 ton pu,but when we pulled the cab and bed to redo and paint them,the 72 Ford F-250 4x4 chassis was almost rusted in half. I got lucky and found a guy who had lost storage due to a divorce,and bought his restored 76 Dodge 1/2 ton 4x4 chassis that had already been blasted,painted,and everything rebuild,and maybe best of all,factory ps,pb,and a 318 Mopar long block still in the crate. The chassis also came with a rebuilt auto overdrive trans. I am embarrassed to tell you the lowball price I paid for it,but when I asked "How much?"and he told me,I almost ripped my pants pulling my wallet out.

 

This truck is going to be soooo much easier to sell with pb,ps,and an automatic transmission. Assuming I even want to sell it after it's back together.

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5 hours ago, Adam H P15 D30 said:

Below is a list of the last 5 cars I built with IFS and my thoughts on each one.  Maybe it will help you with your decision

1.  1947 Ford - Used a Volare clip - Probably the second best driving car I have!  It rides excellent, handles well, good brakes, adjustable ride height.

     Cons: It has a massive steering box in a difficult place to deal with.  If you can deal with that, good choice because you wont have to hack off your front frame to do it.

     Put about 80k on that car including multiple trips from California to Kentucky for the NSRA nats.  I think an aftermarket company is making a smaller box now?

2.  1935 Ford - Used a TCI Mustang II kit with tubular control arms.  No need to cut the frame on the Fords. 

     Cons: Doesn't ride nearly as well as above and the steering is twitchy and I would give it a B-, but hey, it looks good.  Don't drive this one as much but not because of the ride.

3.  1947 Plymouth coupe - Used a 2nd generation Camaro clip.  Had to modify the radiator support to fit the steering box.  Rides good and handles extremely well especially when you add the quick ratio steering box.  Not twitchy at all like rack and pinion.

     Cons: It's too wide!  I had to buy the Fatman narrow control arms to avoid buying silly looking wheels but that = $$$$$$

4.  1956 Ford Panel truck - Again Mustang II but I used the welders series this time (same geometry)  Rides better than the 35 and steering is a little less twitchy probably because it is heavier and longer.

5. 1949 Dodge - (My profile picture) Stock suspension with a Rusty Hope disc brake kit, no shock relocation, 1 coil cut.  I drive this car a lot! Rain or shine!  It doesn't even get a garage.  On the road, this car rides the best BY FAR.  It even handles acceptably, it's still a king pin suspension.  I only wish it had power steering but that's only an issue when stopped and I am not as young as I once was.  I will never put a rack and pinion in it because I prefer how steering box cars drive.

 

Some time back a member here put a ?Mustang? power steering box in and it didn't require a ton of fab work.  Best of all, our quirky pitman arm fit the sector.  I would search for that thread but it was a long time ago.

I have a  1987 Camaro front clip welded to the chassis of my 48 Plymouth coupe,and love the way it handles and rides. Also have the worn-out 305 and trash 205 trans and the Camaro rear in it. Plans are to put my 412 SBC with the Dart 2 heads and hot cam in it,along with the turbo 400 I already own when and if it ever gets redone. Not to mention an entirely new Ron Francis wiring kit I already have in the box. Had to quit driving the car when it backfired and caught fire under the hood when I turned a corner. Damn good thing I carry a fire extinguisher with me,but all that wonderful red and black wiring under the hood,as well as the 4brl Carter carb were fried.

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Bump steer on my 51 Plymouth is a thing.  a real short driver's side tie rod assembly is the major culprit.  The DeSoto's and Chrysler's had more equal length setups but the cheap Plymouth's didn't.

 

That is the major issue with my suspension.  The rest is something that can be dealt with, but short of a major steering linkage redesign, or an R&P conversion you just have to deal with it.  I do drive my cars hard, which is why I also found out the Cambridge will wheel hop, hard if you try to drift it, lol.  Got a set of gas charged shocks coming, maybe they will help.

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