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Got out my driveshaft and u-joints for 48 DeSoto


MarcDeSoto
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I have NOS U-joints in the box, but my old ones still seem good with no play in them.  I wondering what to do?  I could regrease the needle bearings in the blocks, but that wouldn't lubricate the bushing assemblies.  To do that, you need to knock the u-joints out of their yokes.  Also, even on the new old stock blocks and bushings the cork dust seals are shot.  Should I take to a drive shaft, u-joint shop and have them do this job?  

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I went to a good hardware store today, but they had nothing my size.  The size is ID 9/16 OD 13/16, thickness about 1/8.  NAPA does not have it.  they suggest making sealers out of a sheet of cork.  The DeSoto Shop Manual in the lubrication pages says the U-joints should be taken apart, cleaned, and relubed every two years or 20K miles.  My U-joints feel fine with no play and free movement.  But i guess I need to press the bearings out of the yokes and clean and lubricate them.  

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6 hours ago, MarcDeSoto said:

I went to a good hardware store today, but they had nothing my size.  The size is ID 9/16 OD 13/16, thickness about 1/8.  NAPA does not have it.  they suggest making sealers out of a sheet of cork.  The DeSoto Shop Manual in the lubrication pages says the U-joints should be taken apart, cleaned, and relubed every two years or 20K miles.  My U-joints feel fine with no play and free movement.  But i guess I need to press the bearings out of the yokes and clean and lubricate them.  

I would want both the ID and OD to be slightly too small so it stretches, both to increase to OD and fit the cross tightly. So maybe, 1/2ID x 3/4OD,  I think the recess is less than 1/8 so that crosssection should compress nicely.  Those dimensions should be common in any good o-ring service assortment.  Try a bearing store as a better source than a hardware place.

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On 7/14/2022 at 8:34 PM, MarcDeSoto said:

I have NOS U-joints in the box, but my old ones still seem good with no play in them.  I wondering what to do?  

Finally found someone that's a worse nick-picker than me.  Leave it alone if it's okay. 😂   Oil or lightly grease the NOS you have to keep them from rusting and put them up for spares.

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After watching a few videos on changing u-joints, I think I'm going to do it myself.  I have a vise and I can also rent a u-joint removal tool at O'Reillys.  Eric the Car Guy always has good videos on different jobs, even though he doesn't specialize in old cars.  

 

 

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1 hour ago, MarcDeSoto said:

After watching a few videos on changing u-joints, I think I'm going to do it myself.  I have a vise and I can also rent a u-joint removal tool at O'Reillys.  Eric the Car Guy always has good videos on different jobs, even though he doesn't specialize in old cars.  

Do you have ball & trunnion U-joints on your car or the type shown on the splash image for that video? If ball & trunnion then that video will not help you.

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I just took mine apart today. I used one socket larger than the cup and one smaller to press them out in my vise. You should take them apart to evaluate. I found ridges on mine and they will need to be replaced. I wouldn't have seen it if I hadn't pressed them apart.

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FYI.

 

I do not know off hand if the regular desoto sedans and coupes use the same joints as the Suburban with its larger chassis components...

 

But if it does, there is nothing out there but junk replacements. I had to use three of them in the Suburban. I kept all the old ones as the blocks on the new ones are just not well done. They do not fit the mating side at all well. I ran across a Chrysler Service bulletin from about 1953 where some were shipped that did not fit well and they talk about checking cars as they came in for service and how to ID the ill fitting ones and what to do about it. So the index on those "Detroit"  bearing housings are important.

 

I plan on taking the blocks I have collected up and having them machines out or sleeved to fit a modern off the shelf universal. Then I can just swap out the round blocks for the Detroit Blocks.

 

The junk ones were $100 each for a $20 joint with standard round blocks...I think I did a posting on it...

 

James

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I was lucky enough to find NOS u-joints.  Just have to replace the rotten dust seals.  How do I remove the snap rings on the inside of the yoke on the bushings?  I guess they make snap ring pliers.  

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Posted (edited)

The snap rings were easy to pop out with a screwdriver and a hammer.  I rented the U-joint bushing press from O'Reillys and it worked well, BUT!  It popped the bushing out of the yoke OK, but what about the other side.  It didn't push the other bushing all the way out, and you can't push the other bushing out because the U-joint circle prevents that.  So I can't get the bushing out, even though it's out, and I can't get the other bushing out.  I tried to use pliers to pull out the other bushing, but it won't budge.  What should I do?  

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I finally got the u-joints out, but it wasn't easy.  As I said you can't just press them out because the round shoulder gets in the way.  And you can't take a bushing off after you press it in.  I had to use a screwdriver and hammer to hammer the bushing out from the inside.  I destroyed the bushing as I did that.  Now I'm hoping putting new ones in is a little easier!  

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I think the way I should do it is to forget about the bushing that is punched out, since you can't remove it anyway.  but to get channel lock pliers on the other bushing that is sticking out the other side, and twist it back and forth until it comes out.  See the video by Eric the Car Guy above.  

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1 hour ago, MarcDeSoto said:

I think the way I should do it is to forget about the bushing that is punched out, since you can't remove it anyway.  but to get channel lock pliers on the other bushing that is sticking out the other side, and twist it back and forth until it comes out.  See the video by Eric the Car Guy above.  

Almost, my weapon of choice is curved jaw Vise-Grips.

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I got one side of the drive shaft done.  Boy it's hard to get the snap rings back in.  I had to pound the bushing in a bit far just so I could get the snap ring in the groove. After you get the snap rings in, is the u-joint supposed to be a little stiff when you move it back and forth?  Or is it supposed to really loose and floppy?

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I just put in NOS U-joints on my driveshaft.  Putting the new ones in was a cinch using the socket and hammer method.  I gave up on the U-joint press.  It was too hard getting it centered, and then it would put uneven force on the bushing and it would get cocked in the yoke.  I would say avoid it, unless you have a very stuck bushing.  Now I just have to install the bearing blocks, which do not go in the yoke, and fasten it up with the C clamps to the trans and diff.  I feel good about not having to take it to a drive line shop.  

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