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Picking a paint store. Auto Color Library?


MarcDeSoto
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Has anyone used this paint supplier before.https://www.autocolorlibrary.com They are based in San Diego and they say they can sell me acrylic enamel.  My local paint store says they cannont sell me acrylic enamel.  And this paint store specializes in antique colors going back to buggies!  It is the Auto Color Library.  There is no charge for color matching and you choose your color online.  I am thinking of ordering my paint from them.  A gallon costs about $240.  

Edited by MarcDeSoto
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is that with hardener, reducer, fisheye eliminator etc  and based on who is spraying...will they shoot this paint and stand behind its performance or have compatible components to add.   Many products just need to be for the base line product, some have to be paint line specific.  If you doing the shooting yourself, odds are you will need the compatible components of the system.   If you are not shooting the paint yourself....it would be best to talk with the shop you plan to use and get their recommendation and suggestions as many will work with one system only on the average and through a single supplier based on their customer account.  Lot of the paint systems are no longer go as far as they used to and the blends are very close to spray ready from the can and so a gallon is a gallon where old school a gallon was closer to 1.5 gallon when mixed to spray viscosity.  This is again where you should touch base with whoever is going to spray the topcoat....and many shops will not spray topcoat if they do not do the final prep themselves so to avoid customer complaints and voids and sand scratches etc.  

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Dittos on Plymouthy's comments. Acrylic enamel may not have all the components of the modern finishes but I don't know why you would want to use this obsolete process when the modern cross-linked finishes are far superior (but much more $$$$'s). Most likely the enamel doesn't meet CA's strict VOC standards and that's why it's hard to source.

 

Paint is what people use to judge the quality of your restoration......be diligent in selecting who and with what it will be finished.

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I am painting the car myself.  One question I have is should I use the Acrylic Enamel Wet Look hardener.  I asked if this will make the car glossier that original and they said yes.  So I asked if I choose not to use it what would happen.  He said the paint will not flow as well and will not be as durable.  So not sure what to do.  

 

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Posted (edited)

Are cross linkeded finishes a urethane paint?  Are they also super glossy?  I read an article that said that acrylic urethane is the easiest auto paint to apply and that acrylic enamel is difficult.  Any truth to that?  

 

Edited by MarcDeSoto
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I used auto color library for my 51 plymouth. I used their urethane enamel, and have no complaints with the product. I would caution to purchase all your product at the same time. I started by purchasing a quart to see if I liked it. When it performed to my satisfaction I ordered a gallon and there was a slight color difference. I ended up using the quart for the back side of the fenders.  

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The first thing you need to determine if you are going to paint the car yourself is how you are going to assure your personal safety and the safety of any who will be exposed to overspray. Urethane paints have really nasty components that can cause long-term health problems. Spend some time reading the data sheets for any finish you are considering. A source of fresh air for your mask is the preferred way to avoid breathing isocyanates.

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Hardener needs to be used in the proper amount, paint chemistry is something you don't want to experiment with.  Talk to your paint supplier, tell them what you are looking for and have them make the recommendations.

 

Nothing sucks worse than trying to remove semi hardened paint so you can respray.

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Just now, MarcDeSoto said:

I think acrylic urethane is too glossy for an old car, so I think I'm going to use acrylic enamel with half the recommended amount of hardener.   

They sell a gloss hardener & a semi gloss hardener. As others say talk to the supplier.

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No offense, but I'd consider preliminary-prepping the body and then shipping it out to Maaco (or similar production paint service) for final prep and actual spraying.  They paint cars all the time and would likely do a better job and be much quicker than a novice.

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Mark: i have heard mixed reviews regarding the paint quality from this company.  If you have not sprayed a complete car and do not have the proper equipment currently I would suggest that you go onto a good quality Auto Paint supplier company and start to price out the required equipment.  Check out Eastwood to get the cost of a good air compressor, oil and water filters, a very good gun, cleaning supplies air masks and all of the other items needed.  Then create a spread sheet with the cost. Then determine if this is going to be the only car you will paint, figure in your time and effort on body preparation and or there the lack of experience and the list will go on and on. 

 

Of no disrespect to you but I have noted that you do have some trouble when reassembling items back on your car, So take that also in to the learning curve.  Then go out and go to a good quality paint shop and get a price from them. Maybe one of their painters might take it on as a special project. Or even contact an Automitive VoTech School from some HS kids. This is a great learning expereince and the project is overseen by the VT teacher.

 

Just the cost of the equipment will boggle your pocketbook.

 

Rich Hartung

Desoto199@aol.com

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I've taught high school kids before in auto mechanics and auto body.  I would never hand my car over to high school kids.  That's like handing my blood over to Dracula for safe keeping!  I already have all the supplies.  

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Ask your supplier about a flattening additive for your paint! To lessen the gloss to a level you want. Probably a phone call is best.

 

Buy a quality face mask made for paints!!!  Make sure you have a good air flow away from yourself and the car.

 

Never change up the mix ratios as suggested unless you want disaster. Ask for the factory instructions or where to get it online about all the painting recommendations, which will have all sorts of info even the air pressures recommend and it is Free.

 

I have painted cars part time for 50 years and all the changes that happen with formulas and mixes etc. I also get the instructions before I do anything.

 

Just my experience.

 

DJ

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JMNSHO, but acrylic enamel with hardener and single stage urethanes will have about the same gloss.  You can have flatteners added if you desire to reduce the gloss of either, even two stage clears can have that done.   Without hardener the enamel will be much softer than the urethane and gas spills around the filler will damage it.   If you wish to buff the wait time to do that is longer without hardener.   And, repairs to future damage (heaven forbid) is more difficult.  Another major advantage for home painters of hardened paints of either kind, is the shortened time to be tack free, reducing the chance of dust, bugs etc getting in it.

 

Gloss can be controlled to a degree by the color sand and buffing process, if you plan to do that.

 

I don't see a lot of difference in the ease of use, but the acrylics do seem to run easier.  but brand may be more important in that respect.

 

Coverage is the biggest issue with cheaper paints.   Red and yellows in particular don't cover well in competitively priced paints so using a tinted primer will help with that.

 

My truck is getting a cheaper urethane, but I don't need to match a particular catalog color. 

Edited by kencombs
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14 minutes ago, MarcDeSoto said:

I've taught high school kids before in auto mechanics and auto body.  I would never hand my car over to high school kids.  That's like handing my blood over to Dracula for safe keeping!  I already have all the supplies.  

please don't take offense here but as an instructor on the subjects .....there are a lot of question relating to how being asked by you, in truth you should be by your accounts outlining processes and procedures to others here on the forum.  

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I too am going to paint my own car.

If you want to pay for PPG paint you can get a perfect match. However they are ridiculously expensive.

 I have decided to use Summit Racing’s single stage acrylic urethane paint. You won’t get exact matches to factory colors but the price and ease of use puts them in the running.

My last project used the primer materials from Summit and a color match from PPG. The professional who did the job is who specified the materials and worked out great!

 I did use a paint supplier in San Diego for one project and found their stuff hard to get good results.

 I like the simplicity of the Summit paint and the price. If you’d like to compare go to their website, it’s very reasonable.

From the reviews I’ve read they say the paint has a good shelf life but the hardener should be used within one month after opening. So buy the paint you need and the hardener you think you will use.

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Soo many terror stories about paint jail. Cars going into a painters body shop, then never coming out again ... or taking 6 months longer then expected. Or $K's more then originally quoted.

 

 

I really feel that the paint will be what your skills and abilities are capable of. ..... Like welding, you practice & learn as you go.

While there are many high quality paints available, cheaply.

I suggest you try some practice runs on things that do not matter ... I restored & painted a old wheel barrow a few years ago .... just to gain the skills.

Then I built & painted a garden shed .... for the training to use the paint I wanted to use ..... nothing beats practice .... just practice on things that do not matter .... When ready paint your car.

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2 hours ago, Sniper said:

Hardener needs to be used in the proper amount, paint chemistry is something you don't want to experiment with.  Talk to your paint supplier, tell them what you are looking for and have them make the recommendations.

 

Nothing sucks worse than trying to remove semi hardened paint so you can respray.

If you do have this problem, plan on stripping off all of the paint and starting over. Incompletely hardened paint will have a disasterous effect on any paint placed over it. Here a dollar saved could cost you a mammoth amount of time and money.

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Favorite story of a painter not finishing a job.

My neighbor has a 64 chebby truck. It had been restored previously but needed a repaint.

Cousin Jeb does a great job painting it & gets the truck back in a reasonable amount of time. Does not finish the tailgate but claims he will get it done in the next month or so ... too many jobs going on right now.

 

The Cousins father dies, leaves him a few million $$ .... He does a fire sale on his house, shop, takes a cruise to Paris ... Claims he will never paint another car.

My neighbor is out of a tailgate ..... I wonder what others lost in the transaction.

Just saying even people with good intentions have exceptions in life that change.

My neighbor is in the market for a good 1964 Chevrolet tailgate .... He is not mad at his cousin.

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I am not familiar with California's VOC laws by any means, but I don't have any difficulty getting acrylic enamel here in Maine.  And, if you taught high school kids to paint cars, you know what you're doing both equipment and safety wise, so you won't hear any of that from me.  I looked into Auto Color Library when I painted my daughter's car several years ago, I was impressed by what colors are available, but ended up using NAPA's Martin Senour acrylic enamel for the color coat, on top of their Acme branded urethane primer.  More to do with time to obtain the paint than anything else.  I did not paint the car an original color but could have obtained something really close from NAPA had I chosen to.  I did use the system ("CrossFire") with a hardener and am happy with the results, I did not need to polish it.  I just finished the color coat on my brother-in-law's car Sunday, used NAPA's Omni (it's a PPG paint, I think) acrylic enamel (Ford black, easy to match), but did not use a hardener.  And, yes, I'm still waiting for the paint to cure enough to cut and polish.  I only need to polish where I blended on a couple panels.  I only bought a quart, but it would have come out to a bit over $200 for a gallon.  I already had primer.  When I painted our D24 thirty or so years ago, I used acrylic enamel, did not use a hardener, did not need to polish it, and that paint is still holding up, albeit starting to look like a 30-year old paint job.  That was a PPG paint, but I don't remember if it had a specific name.  Drawn out way of saying I like acrylic enamel but am on the fence with hardeners.   

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I wish others would stop beating up on @MarcDeSoto ... because at one time he was a autoshop teacher.

First thing to remember .... when was the last auto shop teacher used in America?

 

Marc has some principles and trying to apply them ..... His teaching skills was 50 years ago. .... I'm more concerned with the young photo they use in the avatar.  ....

 

 

Just incredible how wolves will dive in at a post . Not actually ask why it is important. 

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Los Control, thanks for the generous post and dating my teaching to 50 years ago!  I truth, my Auto Shop and Auto Body shop teaching was in the 80s and was only for a year.  It helps to have experience as a Marine D. I. if you are going to be a high school shop teacher!  A teacher at the high school I was at drove his 64 Mustang in to have his wheel bearings greased.  I asked him, are you sure you want to leave it here?  He did.  I assigned four guys to it.  Next thing I noticed one boy was on top of each of the four fenders jumping up and down to see if they could get the car to bounce!  I spent most of my time as a Language Arts teacher.  In the 80s, urethane paint was known as Imron, and was mainly used on semi trucks and hot rods.  I admit that I'm not up to snuff about today's paint systems.  If it's really true that acrylic urethane and acrylic enamel have the same gloss, I might prefer the acrylic urethane.  I've read that it is easier to apply.  Maybe I should start out with a quart and test it out before diving in whole hog?  

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