Jump to content

Cleaning underside - about to lift body


Bryan
 Share

Recommended Posts

13 minutes ago, Los_Control said:

I'm digging up a dead bush in the front yard

 

I no longer dig up bushes.  I found a trick online, pulled a dozen mature sage brush out in 30 minutes.  Took longer to run them through the wood chipper.  Works on stumps too.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes the leverage is optimal if you can get it.

 

I'm just saying that sometimes we get to comfortable with safety at home & we should not.

Here in the photo I need the 12 gauge 100' cord hanging up behind the engine crane.

Not shown is a leaf blower sitting on the floor in front of this mess.  .... I'm stepping over it with my left foot, I'm trying to reach the cord & over extend my reach .... I in a panic bring my right foot around to catch my balance.

I kick the corner on the square tubing of the engine stand and damage a bone in my foot .... Sucks.

 

All could have been avoided by simply moving the leaf blower then maybe the engine stand ..... This is how stupid accidents happen. ..... I have done many stupid things.

 

I'm just saying to @BryanI would love to help you, I would not get within 5' of that car to remove brush or tree's unless I was setting the blocks up properly on that car. Then I would work around it or under it.

 

I do stupid things, I try to stay away from dangerous things.

 

0525221341.jpg.656dddf5e5473a535344052f651bc6f3.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I’m over in the truck forum and I have my truck on blocks but I use a block of wood between each block...like they do when they set up mobile homes.  Block on block/cement is structurally unsound.   I also use construction block rather than cinder block.  Stronger.  But I do have jack stands as a back up as well. Funny,  I sometimes don’t trust jack stands by themselves at times.  Enjoying this post and want to see that engine pulled! Good luck!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ahem, blocks are adjusted. Got the transmission pulled.  Tried to get everything ready to bring the hoist but it got too hot (1pm).  Was a lot cooler under the car. Now I know why dogs sleep under them.  Wanted to get the fender off and also remove the starter, but next time.   Nasty work.  Got dirty but took a selfie.

IMG_6933.JPG

IMG_6936.JPG

IMG_6937.JPG

IMG_6939.JPG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Next time I'll be ready to pull the motor. Got everything off. Starter, oil cannister, oil lines, linkage, anything that could get in the way.  Motor mount on top section was rotten. When I took the legs loose at the bottom it just pulled off. 

 

Loosened 2 head bolts to attach the chain and got carried away.   Went ahead and loosened all of them.  NONE BROKE.   The last 3 in the middle on the side row near the exhaust manifold were a bear.  Used 700 ft/lbs setting on the impact wrench. That barely done it. Used 400 ft/lbs several times, kept trying the highest setting a few times between. Finally went whole hog on it and they came loose.

 

Found a good speedometer cable and hopefully a good emergency brake cable.

 

Worked on it from 7 am to 11 am.   Might wait til Tuesday to try pulling it. I have to arrange the hoist on the trailer, secure it and attach a come-along to pull it towards the front. Also going to rig straps to the ramp and lift them up a few inches off the ground, so I can back the ramp under the car, to get the hoist close enough.

IMG_6940.JPG

IMG_6946.JPG

IMG_6942.JPG

IMG_6943.JPG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You were smart to loosen the head bolts with the engine still in the car.  When I did that on my core 230, it was on an engine stand and I didn't use an impact, it was pretty comical with me trying to loosen them and my son trying to keep the engine stand from moving.  Ended up having to get the cheater pipe out for a couple of them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

35 minutes ago, Sniper said:

You were smart to loosen the head bolts with the engine still in the car.  When I did that on my core 230, it was on an engine stand and I didn't use an impact, it was pretty comical with me trying to loosen them and my son trying to keep the engine stand from moving.  Ended up having to get the cheater pipe out for a couple of them.

It was more my bad experience with the crank nut and using a long breaker bar, then moving it with an impact wrench.  Was afraid with the highest setting I'd wring some off, but kept at it alternating with the mid & high setting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Today was testing to see how I will use trailer, found I need more pull straps. The come along I have only pulls about 2 1/2 ft. I need minimum 4 ft.  I need to raise the ramp slightly as I back the ramp under the car, but found I need to lift it so it's slightly less than 180 to trailer floor. But the straps at about a 45 degree angle would be in the way. Need to get the ramp slightly up, then attach the other straps (green line in pic).  That's if I am by myself. If my brother comes, He can just lift the ramp up and I'll attach straps.  Given the weight of the motor I'll have to put logs or blocks under the ramp supports (not on the mesh).  I found that you DON'T want the engine hoist wheels to get off the end of the ramp.  They turn sideways and lock. Had some spare rebar that I might use to keep the hoist from rolling back if I have to readjust the come along. 

 

Need to order more straps. Probably middle of next week.

Trailer - hoist 1.jpg

Trailer - hoist 2.jpg

Rebar stop.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great to see you figuring this out. We've all been there and have fond memories of completing similar tasks. I suppose the memories are embellished for many of us as the end reward was so satisfying. That's a nice new looking engine hoist. Aside from the color, the design and parts look identical to mine.

 

Not there to see your job, but wondering...Could you just hoist the engine up high. Choke-up any lifting chains. Lower your truck's tail gate and back right under the slung engine? Lower your engine onto some staged wood blocks. Then ratchet strap it down to the 4 corner tie-downs in your truck box? Might be easier than trying to push/pull the hoist with engine on it up the sloped ramp. A cheap ratchet come-a-long would earns it's keep here if you are alone.

Edited by keithb7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, keithb7 said:

Great to see you figuring this out. We've all been there and have fond memories of completing similar tasks. I suppose the memories are embellished for many of us as the end reward was so satisfying. That's a nice new looking engine hoist. Aside from the color, the design and parts look identical to mine.

 

Not there to see your job, but wondering...Could you just hoist the engine up high. Choke-up any lifting chains. Lower your truck's tail gate and back right under the slung engine? Lower your engine onto some staged wood blocks. Then ratchet strap if down to the 4 corner tie downs in your truck box? Might be easier than trying to push/pull  the hoist with engine one it up the sloped ramp. A cheap ratchet come-a-long would earns its keep here if you are alone.

It's in the woods with soft ground. The hoist is the length of the truck bed, but I could fold it up and lay it down. I could buy some thick plywood as a base, but would have to be enough to pull the hoist back and then rotate it around to place the motor in the truck bed. When I had the empty motor block in the truck bed, I could move it with difficulty. This would be the whole motor and clutch  + FD.   If I use the truck, I'd have to use my wood ramps to slide it off the truck with it laying down, get it on the plywood, and pull it upright.  I''ll measure the height of the trailer bed again and see. Hoping to have the trailer ramp almost parallel to trailer floor. Plus pulling it into the trailer with a ratchet come along. Just my present one only pulls 2 ft.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Went and measured again. Truck bed is 6 1/2 ft long , has a little less than 4ft useable width (wheel wells).  The hoist legs to rear are a little less than6 ft, with a little over 3 ft max width. It would have to stand upright to fit the truck bed.  I can't lift it assembled. I'd have to take the long legs off and the boom off to get it out/in the truck. On the ground once I have the motor lifted, with the turning radius and length I'd have to withdraw it fully loaded, it would probably take 2 pieces of 4x8ft plywood. And the car is on a slope. Would need about $50-60 worth of plywood. Expensive now.  Will probably stick to the trailer and buy a longer pulling come along (which unlike the plywood I can use again).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Spit balling here........lift the engine as high with the hoist as you can to clear it from the car frame. Then attach your truck to the back of the car and drag it away from the hoist, without the engine/tranny the remainder of the car probably doesn't weigh more than 1000lbs. Back your truck up to the hoist and lower the engine onto the bed. Reverse the process when you get home.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, Sam Buchanan said:

Spit balling here........lift the engine as high with the hoist as you can to clear it from the car frame. Then attach your truck to the back of the car and drag it away from the hoist, without the engine/tranny the remainder of the car probably doesn't weigh more than 1000lbs. Back your truck up to the hoist and lower the engine onto the bed. Reverse the process when you get home.

92 Dodge Dakota with a 3.9L V6 and limited slip differential.  The hoist legs have to extend under the car to get it over the motor.  To pull it directly backwards I'd have to cut more trees down. That last one wore me out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bought me a 20 ft chain come along with 1.5 ton capacity.  Figure it might be handy in the future.  Wish I'd paid attention to the length when I bought the 4 ton come along a few years back.  Only pulls about 2 1/2 feet. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Sniper said:

A block and tackle would probably do the trick for you.

I looked through those.  A lot had no stop or catch.  Some listed the ratio improvement. When I saw 7:1 and got to thinking about 1000/7 was still 142 lbs.  Wasn't sure how hard that would be. Just went with a 20 ft chain come along.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You need to be very careful. With soft uneven ground you do not want to lose control of the engine hoist. Unless very firmly positioned they can be tippy or move easily, even on thick plywood. If it tips with you close by, serious injury could result. 600+ pounds of engine can be very dangerous. This is also true if you use the truck bed for the hoist. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This motor pulling brings back memories of my teen years and then some more recent activities. I have an appreciation for laying in the dirt and working under a car on blocks, logs or whatever is worthy and available. It is both challenging and rewarding although now I would also consider if there may be a neighbor or friend known in the area with a front end loader on their tractor or skidsteer willing to help doing the pick using the rigging off the bucket. Even if there is no machinery Just an extra set of hands and eyes not to mention support in case something unexpected happens during the lift is always a good safety practice. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

28 minutes ago, Veemoney said:

 I have an appreciation for laying in the dirt and working under a car on blocks, logs or whatever is worthy and available. ...... Just an extra set of hands and eyes not to mention support in case something unexpected happens during the lift is always a good safety practice. 

I was coated head to toe in coconut oil which kept me from getting eatin' up with redbugs, mosquitoes and deer flies.  Was on a piece of cardboard, but still got dirty from rust & dirt falling off underneath. Wore safety glasses but no mask. With a mask it kept fogging up. Wasn't grinding.  Had it stable with a lot of blocks and jack stands.  Wish the neighbors there did have machinery but no luck. Last thing I have to do is pull the motor up. Going to tie the hoist off on the upper side with rachet straps, and pull it up the ramp with a come along, Might have my brother with me this time. Need a guide while I back the trailer ramp up under the car.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, RobertKB said:

You need to be very careful. If it tips with you close by, serious injury could result. 600+ pounds of engine can be very dangerous. This is also true if you use the truck bed for the hoist. 

I'm of the "let it go" crowd. If that thing gets to tipping over I'll be in the other direction.  Amazing how many people will try to stop some extreme weight from going.  Just like chain saw work..the butt end of that tree will sometimes kick backwards..always be to the side and have clear area to run.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Bryan changed the title to Pulled motor in woods - warped crankshaft

Got er' pulled. My older brother helped.  Took a few tries to get the ramp under. Dug out behind the truck tires to make it lower. One arm of the hoist had to go below the car frame.  Then had to jack the back of the truck up a little to make the rear of the trailer go down further. Used straps on the upper side of the hoist to keep it from rolling downhill in the trailer.

IMG_6954.JPG

IMG_6956.JPG

IMG_6957.JPG

IMG_6960.JPG

IMG_6961.JPG

IMG_6969.JPG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Bryan changed the title to Cleaning underside - about to lift body

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.

Terms of Use