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Chrysler Industrial Engine Observations


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When you increase stroke the crank will push the piston further up the bore and pull it further down the bore.  To keep the piston from smacking into the head you either need to shorten the rod half the stroke increase or shorten the piston height the same amount.  Chrysler chose to shorten the rod.

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14 hours ago, keithb7 said:

Maybe lets see if we can have some fun with this thread and post photos of examples of Chrysler Industrial engines in use. 

The Air Raid siren kicked it off. Let's see what you've bumped into? What old piece of equipment have you seen with an Industrial engine?

 

 

My Wards tractor:

 

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I pulled my IND265 engine from an Oliver Combine - no pictures of that.

I have seen welders powered by these engines. I have seen air compressors built from these engines with special heads - the engine runs on 3 cylinders and uses the other 3 cylinder to pump and compress air. Forklifts, Payloaders, Snow blowers, airport tugs, cement trucks, boats, irrigation pumps, the list is endless. 

Perhaps the most impressive usage of these engines was in WWII tanks..... 5 engines bolted together onto a common jackshaft with a dry sump oiling making a 30 cylinder engine..... 

On Edit: I will see about digging out my small ad collection. I have about a dozen magazine ads I have gathered up selling Chrysler Industrial engines that show them being used in various different applications. I plan on framing them up for part of a wall display when I build the new house. 

Edited by HotRodTractor
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This is a 1960 Massey combine. It had the original 265IND engine, low hours, original plug wires, distributor cap and points. Motor ran like a top, 35psi idle oil pressure, governor set at 1950 rpms max. Compression measured 125 psi all cylinders per operators manual which I have as well.

 

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Massey Harris altered wheat harvesting forever during WWII. Just before the war they created what is widely considered the first "modern" combine - the Model 21. Once the war started and materials were restricted it really hurt the roll out of this fantastic new machine. This is where the genius of the head of Massey Harris marketing changed history.... He went to the war board and pleaded a case that if they could build 500 combines and sell them to farmers with the promise that each one would harvest 2000 acres - the promise also included that the new machines would save gas, improve yields by more efficiency in the threshing process, and free up horses and tractors for other tasks. 

The war board bought into this concept in 1944 - MH built the combines and farmers fought over them.... then harvest came - they started in Texas as the wheat matured there first and worked their way north. They used airplanes to survey the fields and direct these new "harvest crews" to where the wheat was ready. It was a HUGE success and they averaged over 2000 acres per machine that first year. This put them miles ahead of the competition with a million acres of harvest experience and development. This program just grew and grew year after year and gave birth the huge harvest crews that roam the west today harvesting.

The moral of this story? It was powered by a flathead Chrysler 6.

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This is just a small subset of what I have. I love old advertising literature and signs (even though the sign in this picture is a reproduction).

 

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I really kind of fell in love with the "Horsepower with a Pedigree" tag line that the Chrysler Industrial division used. There are a TON of awesome graphics with lots of color and variation on that theme. If someone was smart they would revitalize that tag line for current automotive marketing purposes. It really gets noticable and creative in the early industrial Hemi era. 

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Nice collection! Can we get a solo close up pic of the one that's B&W?  It reads "Now 8 Basic Chrysler Engines". I'd love to read that one.

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4 minutes ago, keithb7 said:

Nice collection! Can we get a solo close up pic of the one that's B&W?  It reads "Now 8 Basic Chrysler Engines". I'd love to read that one.


Yeah - I'll take a nice high quality scan of it tomorrow. It doesn't tell you much of anything - it shows the 5 through 15 Industrial engines and text simply says they have Industrial engines for your 200 to 400ci applications. There are some interesting details to note on the engines themselves, but I'll let you guys pick apart the image when I post it. :D 

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@HotRodTractor tomorrow? How am I suppose to sleep tonight? Lol.

 

Perhaps I will dream about two pedigree horses on the reins. While 8 smooth flat head Chrysler engines purr in the distance.

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1 minute ago, keithb7 said:

@HotRodTractor tomorrow? How am I suppose to sleep tonight? Lol.

 

Perhaps I will dream about two pedigree horses on the reins. While 8 smooth flat head Chrysler engines purr in the distance.


I promise I'm not keeping you in suspense on purpose. I'm moving some stuff around in the house reorganizing and the scanner/ printer is currently in the same room as my sleeping GF. Considering she spent the day in the rain and wind directing traffic for a local COVID vaccination clinic.... I'll let her sleep. 

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 I found this one in my digital stash this morning by accident. I really need to clean up and organize that stuff.... 

868134364_fullpage.jpg.9825b2c85ff0eede749ea3a97ce3d8c0.jpg

I know it doesn't say it... but it is powered by a flathead Chrysler Industrial.

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15 hours ago, HotRodTractor said:

This is just a small subset of what I have. I love old advertising literature and signs (even though the sign in this picture is a reproduction).

You mention the sign being a reproduction...I wonder if any of the ads can be found as reproductions.  I'd love to assemble a collection like yours, even if they were all reproductions.

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Back in the late 80s, I worked at an industrial repair shop.  They did all kinds of repairs and installations of manufacturing equipment, along with sheet metal fabrication, and other metal machining/welding/fabrication, etc.  I was one of the mechanics who worked on their company service trucks and did that part-time and sometimes full-time throughout the latter part of high school and most of college.

 

Anyway, they had some forklifts (three, I think) and at least a couple of welders that were powered by flathead sixes.  In hindsight, they were probably Chrysler sixes.  That's also the place where I purchased my old Dodge Power Wagon (with 230 flathead six) for $50.

 

In the early 90s, a friend showed me an airport tug (he was a private pilot) that was powered by a Chrysler flathead six, and the most interesting part was that it had a LONG weld bead running along the side of the engine, the entire length from the front to the rear, just beneath the block deck (i.e., head mating surface)  He and I figured it must have been through a freeze without the proper coolant mixture, and it cracked the block.  But whatever the reason, it had been welded and put back into service and was in use to that day.

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4 hours ago, HotRodTractor said:

 I found this one in my digital stash this morning by accident. I really need to clean up and organize that stuff.... 

868134364_fullpage.jpg.9825b2c85ff0eede749ea3a97ce3d8c0.jpg

I know it doesn't say it... but it is powered by a flathead Chrysler Industrial.

Here's a postcard of the Massey plant in Batavia NY (on Harvester Avenue, no less!), where I grew up.  To gain access to the US market, Canadian Massey Harris bought the John Harvester Company in Batavia in the late 1890's, and they shuttered this plant  shortly after Massey Harris merged with England's Harry Ferguson Ltd in the mid '50's.  After that, the site became the first ever "business incubator" and the company my dad worked for as a draftsman occupied the red brick building at the far right of the frame.  A lot of flat head Chrysler motors were shipped in on those rail lines!  BTW:  a '69 Polara really floats over those RR grade crossings if going fast enough (don't ask how I know).IMG_0548.jpg.e7a7be307be4266a610dffbe43131161.jpg

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Great to see photos of the old American manufacturing industry. The Massey photo reminds me of the massive Chrysler and Ford factories of the old days, that I have researched.  

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It would be nice to compile a list for all equipment that used the Chrysler flathead engines. It should be detailed to engine, year of machine and model number. Their are lots of variants out there but would be nice as folks can keep an eye out for them in passing. I did a lot of searching to find a 265, most ended up as 251’s. 

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Does anyone know when it became official when Chrysler focused on and produced industrial engines? I’ll guess around WWII? Since Chrysler had been paid to manufacture so much war machinery, perhaps they saw the opportunity? For powering pumps, generators, other equipment beyond automobiles?

 

I saw interesting video featuring the rare Plymouth tractor. They made 200 of them in 1933. Oddly enough they had a 4 cylinder Hercules engine.  The reason seems to be that the Plymouth tractor was not associated with the Chrysler Corporation. It was another company. I suspect they received a letter from the Chrysler lawyers suggesing name change. I don’t know this, only speculating. 

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They decided on shorter rods just so they could use the same pistons? Maybe they were concerned with side load or piston speed. I've built SB Chevy 283's, 327's, and 350's and they all used the same length rods, just different piston pin locations. They all work fine and that's going from a 3" to 3.48" stroke. 

Same with 74" to 80" shovelheads. Piston side load and piston speed in longer stroke motors is a little on the harsh side for durability and the pin is really close to the oil rings, too. If I get energetic I'll dig some stroker and stock Harley shovel pistons out and post 'em to show the pin locations. Should be able to come up with 283, 327, and 350 pistons, too; I'm sort or a hoarder. 🙂

 

 

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What do you guys think would be the best procedure to weasel that industrial engine out from underneath that Massey combine?

  Block up the frame, remove that right front tire and get access from that side?? .....once some of this snow melts , 

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I blocked front axle up square both sides, removed both front tires, removed all drive belts, disconnect both pumps, oil pressure line, lights, regulator, fuel line, cut exhaust, intake breather and some manual clutch linkage.. I think there were 6 bolts holding the skid to the combine frame. Just pulled out the right side. Took 2 hours and a helper. 

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