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Inline Fuel Filter?


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What is the necessity of having an inline fuel filter?  The guy I bought the car from told me it was next on his list to add.  I have the original gas tank and the service manual says there is a filtering device in the tank.  Is an inline filter necessary?

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I certainly would have one. if feasible before the pump or at least before the carb. Old tanks can have rust and who knows what in them and even new tanks can get something bad pumped in them by accident. Cheap insurance.  Also an inline most likely has finer filtering ability that the in tank one. Many new cars have a very good  in tank filter due to fuel injection but back in the old days not as big an issue with the manufacturers.

Edited by plymouthcranbrook
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There is a pick up screen in the tank that I am aware of. It collects the larger chunks. Then there is the screen at the mechanical fuel pump. It gathers the next smaller junk that made it past the pick up screen in the tank. You'll see it settle in the glass bowl of your fuel pump. Next the tiny microns of dirt move on ahead to the carb. An in line filter will help keep the tiny particles of scale, dirt and rust out of your carb. Often found settled in the float bowl. If you put the filter between the mechanical pump and the carb, get a metal housed filter. Not a plastic one.

 

 

IMG_4424.jpg

Edited by keithb7
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I have a Motorcraft FG14C fuel filter screwed into the fuel pump inlet of my '52 Cambridge.  The other end has a nipple for a rubber fuel line.  The filter, made by several manufacturers, is readily available.  The application was '60's-70's six-cylinder Ford products. 

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Here is the type of filetr that I use on my 39 desoto and the picture was taken off of ebay  33-59 MoPar filter  around $35. It has the glass bowel and paper filter. I have this mounter directly before the carb when the needle value is onthe front of the fuel bowel. Last filter before it goes into the carb and lets you see that you have clean fuel and can be take apart easyily.  But never take it apart with a hot engine since it sits directly above the manifold.  Not trying to be a smart axx but just common sense instruction.

 

Rich Hartung

desoto1939@aol.com

 

1933-1959 MoPar GAS FILTER Glass Bowl Plymouth Dodge DeSoto Chrysler Dodge Truck  her is the lisiting

 

1933-1959-MoPar-GAS-FILTER-Glass-Bowl-Plymouth-Dodge-DeSoto-Chrysler-Dodge-Truck

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The ford filter Jersey Harold talks about was used on almost all fords (V-8s included) of that era and they work beautifully - they thread right into the side of our mechanical pumps as he noted. I am using one.

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I cut out a section of rusted fuel line under the driver's door, replaced it with new ethanol friendly line with an inline filter.  Quite a bit gets by the pickup filter, as evidenced by the crud in it after 6 months.  The only down side is the sem of the filter started leaking and needed changing at the side of the road.

 

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It is not "necessary" per se, but as you can see from the posts, it is a very good idea.  I have a metal filter between the fuel pump and carburetor.  Which is in addition to the one on the fuel pump, and in addition to the screen in the tank.  There is a lot of potential for crud to enter the fuel system at every point between the innards of the tank and the carburetor, especially as these cars age, new fuel system parts are installed, etc.  One of those "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure" things.  

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