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PT81PlymouthPickup

TAPPED HOLE IN CYLINDER HEAD AND GROUND STRAPS?

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While reading about distributors, I came across several posts and articles suggesting adding ground straps is a wise move? I'm considering adding a couple. One from the engine block to the cab and another from the engine block to the chassis? I'm not having any issues, but I know bad grounds were often problematic in the early automobiles. A lot of the circuitry on our trucks rely on grounds through the body. My cab is mounted with wooden blocks and rubber pads. The bolts that pass through the mounting blocks I assume is where the conductivity occurs, but with rust and sometimes newly painted surfaces could inhibit that. Our engines are also rubber mounted, so again the bolts must be where conductivity occurs. Has anyone added ground straps? Think it wise?   AND!, While I was looking around for tapped holes in the block to connect to, I noticed one on the head that I could not remember (or perhaps never knew) why it's there? (I'm not talking about the one over #6 cylinder for timing). This one is about two thirds back from the front adjacent to a head bolt. I took the bolt out on an extra engine I have and it appears to go into the water jacket in the head? It was a standard thread (not pipe thread) with a star washer only. The one on my truck is the same and has never leaked. You would think this should be a pipe thread? I guess with an un-pressurized system a little permatex is all that's was needed? Anyone know what this was for and If there's any reason not to use it for a ground strap?

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You can never have too much ground . I have added straps as you mentioned . I also added ground wires from the head lights to the frame and probably the tail lights  too . I don't know what those threaded holes were for on the head but they would make good grounds too .  Vintage Power Wagons recommends that the battery ground strap be bolted directly onto one of the starter bolts , stock is to one of the transmission bolts . 

Edited by Jerry Roberts

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Grounding to the block would be better as the distributor is part of one of the ground paths...grounding the battery to a starter mounting stud also helps improve starter performance...

As for the mystery bolt, I am unsure of its purpose...there are some obscured pictures in one of my industrial engine manuals that appears to show a bracket bolted to the head in that area...the bracket is used for throttle control on dual carburetor setups...

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43 minutes ago, Jerry Roberts said:

You can never have too much ground . I have added straps as you mentioned . I also added ground wires from the head lights to the frame and probably the tail lights  too . I don't know what those threaded holes were for on the head but they would make good grounds too .  Vintage Power Wagons recommends that the battery ground strap be bolted directly onto one of the starter bolts , stock is to one of the transmission bolts . 

Yeah Jerry, my battery ground strap was, and still is bolted to the transmission. I guess that would be OK?  There's lots of metal to metal surfaces between trans, bell housing, and engine along with quite a few bolts. Seems more likely to have ground issues between body and chassis?

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Grounding straps are a crutch to cover for bad ground path design or preparation.   Even on gensets worth 6 figures we only use one. 

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1 minute ago, JBNeal said:

Grounding to the block would be better as the distributor is part of one of the ground paths...grounding the battery to a starter mounting stud also helps improve starter performance...

As for the mystery bolt, I am unsure of its purpose...there are some obscured pictures in one of my industrial engine manuals that appears to show a bracket bolted to the head in that area...the bracket is used for throttle control on dual carburetor setups...

Hi and thanks again JBN, I thought it might be for a bracket also, but was surprised that it goes into the water jacket. The water pump bolts also go through into the water jacket on the block. I had some leaks there until I painted the threads with permatex 2.

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1 minute ago, ggdad1951 said:

Even on gensets worth 6 figures we only use one. 

 

But are those 50-80 years old and maintained by people on budgets for years or just cheap?

 

Hauled around farms and dirt roads and such daily?

 

I Under stand the point but not all the forums members have restored top to bottom their vehicles at least not yet. 😉

 

DJ

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Just now, DJ194950 said:

 

But are those 50-80 years old and maintained by people on budgets for years or just cheap?

 

Hauled around farms and dirt roads and such daily?

 

I Under stand the point but not all the forums members have restored top to bottom their vehicles at least not yet. 😉

 

DJ

 

Why I said crutch.  Slapping ground straps on doesn't solve the problem.

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5 minutes ago, PT81PlymouthPickup said:

What is a "genset"?

I work for Cumming in Power Generation as an engineer on diesel and gas (LP/propane) electrical generators used in homes, RVs all the way up to datacenters for back up power.

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3 minutes ago, DJ194950 said:

 

But are those 50-80 years old and maintained by people on budgets for years or just cheap?

 

Hauled around farms and dirt roads and such daily?

 

I Under stand the point but not all the forums members have restored top to bottom their vehicles at least not yet. 😉

 

DJ

Mine just turned 81 and I've been restoring it for 41 years. And! It's still not done. 😉

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4 minutes ago, PT81PlymouthPickup said:

I believe most newer vehicles run separate ground wires for just about everything?

Partially required now with all the plastics used now.

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1 minute ago, ggdad1951 said:

I work for Cumming in Power Generation as an engineer on diesel and gas (LP/propane) electrical generators used in homes, RVs all the way up to 95 liter datacenters for back up power.

Cool! Never heard that term before. I don't get out much. 🙁

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Just now, PT81PlymouthPickup said:

Cool! Never heard that term before. I don't get out much. 🙁

 

Kinda an industry term I'd guess too?  😛

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19 minutes ago, ggdad1951 said:

Grounding straps are a crutch to cover for bad ground path design or preparation.   Even on gensets worth 6 figures we only use one. 

Wait a minute!  Are you inferring our Mopar's were poorly designed?  Lols! 

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54 minutes ago, PT81PlymouthPickup said:

Wait a minute!  Are you inferring our Mopar's were poorly designed?  Lols! 

 

By no means, just that like anything else grounds need to be maintained!  :)

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3 hours ago, PT81PlymouthPickup said:

Hi and thanks again JBN, I thought it might be for a bracket also, but was surprised that it goes into the water jacket. The water pump bolts also go through into the water jacket on the block. I had some leaks there until I painted the threads with permatex 2.

Some cars have a stud that goes in that spot for the throttle linkage to pivot on. 

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