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Midwestmopar

Please help identify these brakes/axle

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Car: 53 Plymouth Cranbrook

Rear axle: pre64 8 3/4? (No numbers stamped on the left side of snout)

Problem: left brake will self adjust tighter and tighter til it drags alot.

 

So far ive determined its not a stock axle or atleast brake hardware and shoes because it doesnt have the cams to adjust the brakes. I'm assuming its pre64 cause I'm still using hub/drum rears. I have yet to measure the pinion diameter but the measurements ive taken from backing plate to backing plate are right around 52 1/2inches and the center of the leaf springs are 41 1/2 inches. The only numbers I could find on the housing are in the picture. My drums are 10 inch and my shoes are about 2 1/2 wide. Can anyone help me with ideas on what could cause my left to lock up? Also what parts should I buy to replace whats on it. Ive pretty much only checked to make aure my adjuster was on the correct side which it is. 

Screenshot_20200727-161001.png

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not that its a big deal but the brake keeper at the top pin should be positioned correct for the arch of the shoes and displacement as designed...the self adjuster cable is off the track...the one shoe is locking because the other side may not be functioning....you should be able to check that casting number online.

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good eye on the cable, I must have missed the guide when I put it back on after taking the adjuster out and making sure there was an L stamped on it.

 

is the front shoe on backwards? as I was looking at the shoes I seen it has those 3 spots to ride on the backing plate. I haven't pulled the shoes off to check if all 4 shoes have it. from my pictures I snapped of the right side looks like it has a shoe with the 3 high spots facing outward also. . . . . maybe the front shoe is swapped on the wrong side?

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Looks like someone swapped on complete later style (60's MoPar) backing plates probably off a Plymouth or small Dodge.

The picture appears to be the drivers side so yes the E-brake cable goes to the rear...the longer shoe lining also to the rear.

Also the top pivot pin as PA mentioned is on upside down plus the cable off the pivot..

The differential carrier case # 1141543/44 appears to be a 1936-50 all 6 cylinder cars ...Ply/Dodge/DeSoto and Chrysler.

1951-53 Plymouth's use carrier case # 1327816

Also the rear axle  in your car probably has 10 spline axle shafts (which were used in all MoPar car models up to1952) unless someone has swapped 53 side gears into the rear end. 

As built new.... all 1953 Plymouth's used 16 spline axle shafts.

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Is there not also a missing steel cross ( about 6-8" long) bar that holds a spring wrapped around the cross bar against  the front shoe?

It rides between the front and rear shoes in the notches of the shoes Below the brake cylinder pins?

 

Something like this pic.?

 

DJ

external-content.duckduckgo.com.jpg

Edited by DJ194950
Add Q. Is this front brakes only?

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This pic is out of my 67 FSM, note they are listed as front brakes,  The rears have the strut DJ mentioned.  Yours look to be redrilled a bit to fit.  I know I mocked up a set of 80'sw M body rear backing plates to my 51, the bolt pattern didn't match and I never thought to redrill.

 

 

67 brakes.JPG

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On MoPars with the trans E-brake no strut rod and cable /lever is used on rear brakes. Not needed.

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16 hours ago, Dodgeb4ya said:

Looks like someone swapped on complete later style (60's MoPar) backing plates probably off a Plymouth or small Dodge.

The picture appears to be the drivers side so yes the E-brake cable goes to the rear...the longer shoe lining also to the rear.

Also the top pivot pin as PA mentioned is on upside down plus the cable off the pivot..

The differential carrier case # 1141543/44 appears to be a 1936-50 all 6 cylinder cars ...Ply/Dodge/DeSoto and Chrysler.

1951-53 Plymouth's use carrier case # 1327816

Also the rear axle  in your car probably has 10 spline axle shafts (which were used in all MoPar car models up to1952) unless someone has swapped 53 side gears into the rear end. 

As built new.... all 1953 Plymouth's used 16 spline axle shafts.

so what you're saying is the case number shows an earlier model axle and a later model brake system . . . . .this should be fun haha. thank you for your help, what was your source for the case numbers? I spent a lot of time googling but it did me no good.

 

Sniper that picture helps a lot, previous to this car my oldest car was a 78 so my knowledge (cut off years) on when they stopped doing certain stuff is limited. I'll take your info and to research some new hardware and shoes. hopefully my drums can be turned.

 

dj thanks for your picture too.

 

now to use all this info and narrow down my parts list.

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My guess

It's like automotive archeology.

Self adjusters on Bendix style brakes came around 1963?

The last manufacturer to switch to flanged axles had to be AMC (if they ever did).

So my guess is the axle came from some Rambler from the mid to late 1960s.

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