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pflaming

Learned some very basic things

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My thanks to Ulu (Greg) who cane and helped me. 
1) how to solder.  Learned what tinning is, tat a ball of solder will stay on the soldered tip for application.

2) how to make a secure joint, A, wrap a snake wire around the new joint, then solder it all, 

3) how to make a wiring diagram for a new rewire. He had the specification diagram taped  on a board, over that tracing paper. Then drew the new wiring diagram on the tracing paper. Genius. 
 

Always something to learn.  The above probably known by most, but exciting for me. Now, with his instructions I can complete my Sportster. Photo is curren status. Will take today off to get new required parts. 
 

 

FC890ACA-BDA4-4782-BC24-61429B11B20A.jpeg

Edited by pflaming

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I don't think I've ever soldered stainless, but it's normally just a matter of getting things really clean, then getting the heat where it's needed.

I've soldered copper pipe and copper wire, steel to steel, and copper/brass to steel. I've soldered my wire framed eyeglasses, which I used to break frequently as a kid. 

I've soldered little jewelry of unknown alloys. I recently bought some stuff for soldering aluminum, but I haven't tried it yet.

 

The trickiest soldering I ever did was in a gas station in Layton Utah. The throttle cable of my Yamaha had broken at the twist end.

The guy had solder but no soldering iron. I managed to heat the ferrule with a BIC lighter, and poke out the broken end with the remaining (trimmed) cable.

I had pre-tinned the cable, and it soldered instantly.

 

When it's done right, it happens fast.

 

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@pflaming

 

That little repair we made on the point's wire?

 

I had to do that on every wire to the main harness plug on my boat motor.

There's 13 wires, close together, and it was a chore.

 

I didn't heat-shrink each wire though.

When I was done I over-molded everything with plumber's 5-min epoxy putty.

 

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It's gotta stay clean. If it gets "white rust" you must toss it. If it's fat stuff, you might scrape it.

I have a lead pot for bullet making, and when the lead melts, all that corrosion comes loose.

You drop some wax in the pot and it fluxes the lead, causing all the dross to rise so you can skim it.

Any corroded solder goes there, for casting informal slugs and shot.

Corroded solder is insulated from heat by the corrosion, and so heat control becomes problematic.

Otherwise, the flux brings out any corrosion when it wets out.

 

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10 hours ago, Ulu said:

I don't think I've ever soldered stainless, but it's normally just a matter of getting things really clean,

Not sure why I think I can solder it ... thinking lower heat I guess? Proper fix would be to take it to someone that is experienced welding SS.

The fasteners were all corroded and instantly twisted off when removing. Leaving 3 round mounting holes like this.

0528200740.jpg.f7937a4878f588eeef9de987b0981782.jpg

 

I just do not want to make it worse then it is. Will probably end up using a small SS screw with a nut and call it a day.

My original thought was to use a SS flat head screw behind it, plug weld it with solder, then build it up on the inside with solder ...just doubt would be strong enough.

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4 hours ago, Los_Control said:

Not sure why I think I can solder it ... thinking lower heat I guess? Proper fix would be to take it to someone that is experienced welding SS.

The fasteners were all corroded and instantly twisted off when removing. Leaving 3 round mounting holes like this.

0528200740.jpg.f7937a4878f588eeef9de987b0981782.jpg

 

I just do not want to make it worse then it is. Will probably end up using a small SS screw with a nut and call it a day.

My original thought was to use a SS flat head screw behind it, plug weld it with solder, then build it up on the inside with solder ...just doubt would be strong enough.

If you have an oxy/act torch,  you may be able to do it with a silver bearing brazeing rod.  Won't corrode, lower melt point than SS, will polish up, different color but maybe passable.  Plenty strong as it's used on high pressure AC and even hydraulics.  And, high silver content makes it wet out and flow easily.  Not cheap though, I think 3 sticks about 24" long were  12 bucks from eba.

Edited by kencombs

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Too bad ebay sellers are now so greedy...three name plates on there ..$150.00 to over $300.00

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tig of stainless if you got the technique and good hand/eye....else.....you can silver solder and buff it out...slight discoloring sometimes...but not really stand out as been my experience...I have to also make a call here soon on Tig or silver solder on the stainless window frames of my car......I am going to drill a small hole way at the bottom out of sight and make a practice run with the Tig….if a failure...I'll never tell..... 

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24 minutes ago, Plymouthy Adams said:

tig of stainless if you got the technique and good hand/eye

You trying to give me a heart attack?  :D

My wallet is clamped down so tight I did not want to spring for the bottle of gas for mig welding ... Tig setup for my welder is another $550+

Los does his best Sanford and son impression .... Look out it's the big one!

 

I will mark tig as best answer. Sadly to get to this item in the future for adjustment or work ... pull the hood, radiator and be a contortionist to reach it ... I want to make sure it is solid the first time. And that would mean find a good welder that can do it ...

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My buddy before he passed gave me his nice MIG unit so a certain family member would not give it away for a quick drug fix.....I have not so much as powered it up but did buy and assemble a very nice cart for it to reside.  Maybe one day I will weld with it but I will say it will not be car body panels...I may use it when I modify a door on the barn coming up soon.  I have other means to fry that fish which is a car body....

 

BUT...….silver solder is easy repair process that requires no expensive equipment.  

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3 minutes ago, Plymouthy Adams said:

BUT...….silver solder is easy repair process that requires no expensive equipment.  

Thanks again for the tip, I will investigate it and learn.

I am very comfortable soldering wire connections and in my plumber days soldered miles of copper plumbing .... "silver soldering" is a term I have heard but know nothing about.

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It melts a little hotter, that's all. The alloy has some silver in it and it varies by grade.

I've done it and I think it will be OK for trim metal.

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as is most all things, there is good reading on the internet in forms of white papers...and as with all subjects people write about....not all of them are truly professional and some are just your basic hacks.....silver solder is not at all hard to do and most can be done with a propane torch, flux is a basic borax blend...but there are a few rules and guide lines to follow in the process.  Suggest reading a few articles first and you will find the key points will be posted in each and you will soon recognize the basic principles that separate the truth and process from that of the hacker quick fix.  Supplies to get you started and grades of solder can be found at most all plumbing retailers but definitely at AC supply houses for certain. Read a few papers, practice on a piece of scrap...get comfortable with the process...as with all weld/solder cleanliness and correct process and flux are key.

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I can weld pretty well but I know my limits so I prefer to have my BIL do the welding on structural items, stainless, etc. He learned working on Navy fighter jets and since retiring from there about 20 years ago he's worked every day at a fabrication shop building everything imaginable. I started playing viola when I was 8 years old and found that there's no substitute for practice. 

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Just a comment about silver bearing processes.  Silver solder melts at a lower temp than Silver Braze.   Solder can be done with propane.  Braze is normally done with OX/ACe but can be done with ace/air torches.  Braze is much stronger and is the norm for air conditioning as it is better suited to the pressures encountered.  It is also used to attach hydraulic fittings to steel lines.   With high silver content rod and well prepared surfaces, it can be done with no flux.   An acetylene torch can have much smaller tips and are better suited for small work as the heat can be contained to a limited area.  My propane torch has a huge flame in comparison and won't melt silver brazing rod.

 

either are much easier (at least for me) than welding, especially on unusual metals or dissimilar metals.  When I wrote my first comment on the subject I used silver solder, but edited to braze as that is a better fit for the hole pictured IMO.

 

I've always wanted to try mig brazing but the wire is crazy expensive for playing around with no real need for it.

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2 hours ago, MackTheFinger said:

 

Hey, shouldn't you be out pouring concrete??

just came in for the camera...truck just left..concrete has been placed...ran the screed  and floated once....now is the waiting period to continue the work... has gone very well so far...post a pic later....you folks enjoy your day....I am...!!!

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5 hours ago, Plymouthy Adams said:

just came in for the camera...truck just left..concrete has been placed...ran the screed  and floated once....now is the waiting period to continue the work... has gone very well so far...post a pic later....you folks enjoy your day....I am...!!!

Sounds like a good day!! Glad it's all working out!! Don't forget to sign your work!

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5 minutes ago, MackTheFinger said:

Sounds like a good day!! Glad it's all working out!! Don't forget to sign your work!

Maybe go get a new kitten, is the season and let it run across the pad?

This lil girl we got yesterday, today she is figuring out the doggy door.

 

 

0529201032.jpg

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15 minutes ago, MackTheFinger said:

Sounds like a good day!! Glad it's all working out!! Don't forget to sign your work!

Years ago we would buy terracotta tiles from Mexico, they were hand made and then laid out in the sun to  bake. Then a stray dog would wander across them and leave prints.

They became very popular.

Today, when you order x amount of tile, you have to open the boxes and separate the ones with paw prints. then lay them in some sort of path that makes sense.

Just became so popular and a demand for the tiles with paw prints, today I think they have a hand stamp and randomly add them. I think it adds character and a lived in effect. :) 

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1 hour ago, Los_Control said:

Years ago we would buy terracotta tiles from Mexico, they were hand made and then laid out in the sun to  bake. Then a stray dog would wander across them and leave prints.

They became very popular.

Today, when you order x amount of tile, you have to open the boxes and separate the ones with paw prints. then lay them in some sort of path that makes sense.

Just became so popular and a demand for the tiles with paw prints, today I think they have a hand stamp and randomly add them. I think it adds character and a lived in effect. :) 

First time I laid those tiles was in a sun room/sauna for a guy.  Black grout.  I failed to seal them first.  Fortunately, I didn't grout very far before I figured it out.  Took forever to get the black out of those first few.  Sealed the rest, the grouted, much better.

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