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I have had an oil leak since owning my 1951 Dodge B3B,  I have always assumed that it was from the drain plug.  So I changed to a new plug but still the leak continued.  So at the last oil change, I changed to a nylon washer in an attempt to stop the leak.  But the leak continued.  The leak is not catastrophic but is annoying.  Of course I have maintained a drip pan on my shop floor to catch the leaks, but I still wanted to secure a solution.  

 

So yesterday in part due to current home confinement and the arrival of warm weather, I cleaned the exterior of the oil pan with degreaser and then using body powder, I powdered the pan in order to locate the source of the leak.  While the oil primary drips to the ground from the drain plug, that is only because it is the lowest point on the oil pan.  It is actually leaking from the dipstick connection on the side of the oil pan running down the side of the pan, and finally across the bottom of the pan to the drain plug.  Since this connection point appears to be spot welded or riveted onto the oil pan, the most be a method to reseal the seam between the two pieces.

 

So my question, Has anyone else experienced this issue?  Has anybody found a viable solution?  or Do I just the drip pan?

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you mint try a temporary maintainable fix = cork the joint using oakum (Plumbers soil pipe joint rope) or cooking cotton string taped into the space (crack) where the stamped oil dipstick tube base is spot welded to the pan.  You mint try this while you are deciding to remove the pan.  Charlie Stephenson

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1 hour ago, stylesadamson said:

Probably worth trying Permatex Ultra Black gasket maker before you remove the pan.

Agree.  I'd start with a can of brake parts cleaner, sprayed directly at the pan/dipstick adapter joint. Blow that off with a closely directed air gun.  You want to blow everything out of the joint.  Repeat until you sure the joint is dry inside.  put a bead of your permatex  on and push it into the gap with a clean putty knife or other tool.  wipe off excess and apply a new bead.  Just enough to form a fillet (airplane meaning, not steak) the height of the stick adapter and the same width on the pan.

 

Won't cost much and may work.

Edited by kencombs

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Mine is an older model, so this might be different on yours. On my 46 the tube is pushed into the block and it was leaking at that point. I pulled it out and "reformed" the end of the tube with a round punch right up the tube to make that part bigger in diameter. I then pushed it back into the block, had to gently tap it down around the edges. Doesn't leak a bit now.

 

Does that one pull out also?

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I have had my pan off 2x since i got it in september. First was to clean it. Second time was to remove timing cover. I have yet to replace the gasket. It will be coming off again, for the last time. Gasket set is cheap and its easy to remove. 

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10 hours ago, lostviking said:

Mine is an older model, so this might be different on yours. On my 46 the tube is pushed into the block and it was leaking at that point. I pulled it out and "reformed" the end of the tube with a round punch right up the tube to make that part bigger in diameter. I then pushed it back into the block, had to gently tap it down around the edges. Doesn't leak a bit now.

 

Does that one pull out also?

 

Front sump pans will have the dipstick tube attached through the block. Rear sump pans need a dipstick tube attached to the pan, the the port in the block gets plugged.

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If it is just weeping I wouldn't worry too much about it. There will be other leaks....😯

Probably the only good permanent fix would involve removing the pan and having the perimeter of the connection brazed.

Jeff

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1 hour ago, Jeff Balazs said:

If it is just weeping I wouldn't worry too much about it. There will be other leaks....😯

Probably the only good permanent fix would involve removing the pan and having the perimeter of the connection brazed.

Jeff

Good advice.  If I were removing the pan, brazing or soldering would be my choice of fixes also.

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I have a coil of silver solder that I've had for years and would probably use it for a small job like that.It takes very little and flows well. 

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I think they originally did solder and rivet attachments to the oil pans.

If not solder some kind of sealant.

It might be tough to clean and solder...oil could wick out and contaminate.

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If brazing the inside is done, cleaning the joint with solvents is the 1st step, then apply an open flame to the joint is next, to try to burn out as much hydrocarbons as possible...after cooling, clean with solvents again, then braze away...

 

One of the advantages to applying a sealant to the joint from the inside is that the crankcase oil will be pushing the sealant into the joint...

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For a quick cheap fix you might want to try, "SealsAll". Drain your oil clean up the seam, apply. Stuff has been around forever and is gas and oil resistant.

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16 minutes ago, 1949 Wraith said:

For a quick cheap fix you might want to try, "SealsAll". Drain your oil clean up the seam, apply. Stuff has been around forever and is gas and oil resistant.

 

I used SealAll on a gas tank and it certainly did the job and it didn't leak as long as I had the vehicle.

 

 

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I want to thank all who contributed good suggestions.  To summarize the solution whether the patch is made internally or exteriorly best practice would involve

1. Drain the oil

2. Remove the pan

3. Thoroughly clean the seam area

4. Seal the seam area

5. Reinstall pan

6. Refill oil

7.  Pray that the repair worked.

 

Sealing the seam with solder or blazing would seem to be the best long term solution for a 69 year old truck to last another 69 years; but heck I will not last that long.

 

For now I think I will keep the drip pan and make regular dipstick checks before driving the B3B until it is time to change oil and filter again in December and make the seam repair at that time.

 

This forum as well as my SSR forum have been a godsend to discuss the odd issues owning an unique vehicle like these wonderful vehicles can have.

 

Bill

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