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lostviking

What heater fits 1946 WD15?

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OK, can anyone tell me which model or models of heaters would be correct for a 1946 WD15? I see model 46 and 36 and 31...some look almost identical. Do they span multiple years?

 

Thanks.

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I should have looked at the parts book first :) For the WD15 it shows Deluxe Models 31 and 36 and Tri-airstream Model 27 and Truckmaster Model 61...if I'm reading this thing correctly.

 

Thanks Ed.

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I ended up buying a Deluxe Model 31 from a 1949 truck off ebay. I got it today and disassembled it. Sheet metal is pretty good, just a bit of surface rust to fix. Not sure about the blower or the core yet. I tried testing the motor, but I only have 12V...I didn't think it would hurt momentarily so I setup a test. When I tap the lead the motor jumps, but then stops. Keeping the voltage on does nothing, but I didn't let it stay on more than a second to keep from overheating something. I can tap, tap, tap and it moves each time. Don't these motors run from straight 6V DC?

If I have to replace the motor, does anyone know how the fan is secured. It looks like it's pinned through the shaft.

Thanks.

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Know what would be really helpful? If we could compile a set of photos describing each heater model that we’ve found. Especially the location of the mounting studs and the tubes into and out of the core.

 

If those of us who have restored a heater or two would prime the pump by sending information on a model or two, we could get a valuable resource together fairly quickly for the more common models. Then people could add rarer models as they are found.

 

I’ll try to find the picture before I installed the heater in my B3B.

 

I’m looking for a heater for my WD21,  it both the mounting and the hose locations are completely different.

 

if you think such a resource would be helpful, please add your contribution to the thread. When there is a good set of info, we can compile into a document that can go in the Pilot Knowledge section of DPETCA or some other suitable place.

 

Perhaps should start another thread to avoid hijacking this one, though.

 

Thanks

 

Bob

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I'll get a set of pictures taken, showing dimensions of everything...once I'm back to work on it. Right now it's raining a bit, so I am playing around with other things.

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OK, this can get things started. This is the heater core from a Mopar Deluxe Model 31. These go though part of the housing, which is soaking in PB Blaster right now, and that is the spacing of the mounting holes on the firewall.

 

If this is the same spacing as your firewall holes, then the Model 31 would fit. At least there. Under the dash is another matter. I'll get pictures of all the sheet metal later. I plan on using electrolysis to derust everything before I paint it all again. Very nice example done on Youtube showing that this is very easy to do, if done safely. Meaning out doors! You can't hurt the metal, unlike using sand or even glass bead blasting. Yes, I know glass bead is pretty safe, but if there is a will there is a way. The electrolysis method is completely safe to steal. Once the rust is gone, it simply stops doing anything.

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I had to saw the output shaft on my motor to get the fan off. Someone previously broke the set screw off, rather than let something penetrate and free it up. Seems to be a repeating story on this truck. Some people have no patients. I ordered a replacement from NAPA. It is not an exact replacement, but is darn near a perfect one. I could have tried pick it up at the store, but I paid the extra $12-13 to have it shipped to my house. About $50. It is slightly shorter, and slightly fatter than the stock one.

 

If I could have gotten the fan off without sawing the shaft, I might have been able to rebuild it. It looked like the brushes and commutator simply needed to be cleaned up. That and a general cleaning and regrease. I might just put it back together for the fun of it. I could still repair the shaft with an extension if I drilled and tapped the end of it and made an extension. But that's too much work when you are not forced to do it.

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got my new 6V motor today from NAPA. It will work just fine I think. Only slightly different in size from the original, but I might need to trim the metal a bit in the rear (on the core bracket) because the wires come out there and hit. Just a small half moon cut, but when I put some vibration isolators in the mount, that might move it back enough. I'll have to see.

 

 

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Soaked the fan with the broken off setscrew in PB Blaster. I got out my Cobalt drills and starting with the smallest, drilled as near down the center of the cut off shaft as possible. I stepped up the drills until I got close to the edge, then tapped the hole I'd drilled.

 

Next I got my flat punch and a small hammer, and went to work on the setscrew. I finally got it moving. Combination of the PB Blaster and maybe relieving some pressure on the threads (?). That and some heat cycles....nothing more than the hot San Diego sun was used.

 

I ran a bolt into the threads I made, and as it bottomed out the shaft began to move. It was rusted up a bit, but working on it fairly gently I got it out. I used another .25 drill bit to clean up the bore of the fan, and it's a pretty snug fit on the new motor shaft. I might take them both to work tomorrow and run a reamer through the bore. I don't want to have to press fit the fan.

 

Other than that, I still have LOTS of work left. I need to see if the core is salvageable, it does look pretty nice, but has a couple areas I might have to solder up. Been there before. Before I do anything I want to soak it and dissolve anything that has built up inside. Then I'll see about needed repairs.

 

Last is to clean up the sheet metal and repaint. It's pretty good considering. Nothing is in a condition that I shouldn't be able to use it. There is a band of metal that wraps around the two halves of the box and sort of holds it all together. It was broken, something that was in the ad. I am not sure if the metal can be welded up or not. I'll take it to an expert I know. He's done some real jewelry for me at work on my own designs. If anyone can put humpty dumpty back together he can

 

More to follow.

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Had some more fun with the trucks parts today. For this thread the heater core. While I know this proves nothing, not under pressure, haven't done anything to remove build up inside...I filled it full of water...and there were no leaks.

I guess I can say that it's not complete trash. It looked pretty good and next I'll look at dissolving any build up inside and try that leak test again. I could put a hose on it with a bike inner tube fitting and pump on it a bit. That would be the proof.

Pretty good initial test though.

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Did a cold water flush  on the core today. Great flow and nothing at all came out. Seems pretty clean inside. I spent a bit of time washing the outside, then after drying I treated the surface of the steel with Coroseal to convert any surface rust and prevent any new from forming. I love that stuff.

I've got a can of VHT self-etching primer to go at it with, then I'll paint it. I figure a radiator black would work best.

 

Edited by lostviking
Snake oil

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Got my VHT self-etching primer today. Painted it and did my best to get between the fins. Now I'll get some radiator black and finish the job.

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Edited by lostviking
Proof is in the picture :)

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Finally back working on the heater again. Today I'm using electrolysis to remove the surface rust from the sheet metal parts on the heater box. I started by buying some rebar hooks off Amazon, some washing soda (sodium carbonate, not bicarbonate) and some steel wire. I had some heavy 10AWG copper wire, which I stripped and then used to connect the rebar together. I'm using a 5 gallon pail, filled with water and about 1 tblsp of washing soda per gallon. You can see from the video below the setup, the polarity and what I'm using as a power source. It seems to be working rather well.

 

I did forget to get a before picture of the first part, but it basically looked just like the one here. I cleaned it with water and a brush to removed loose crud, then wired it up with steel wire to ensure I had a good connection. There are many guides on YouTube showing how to do this. One note, I would have used my battery charger at 2Amps, but mine is the type that senses the battery. No battery, no output. So, bench supply instead.

 

 

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Here is a link to the video: https://photos.app.goo.gl/5PBfkAGMDEddCXUK8

 

Edited by lostviking

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OK, here's the first part after only 1 hr. It's plenty good for me. The really shiny clean parts are where there used to be paint. The black is where the rust used to be. Quick wash job and steel brush, then VHT self-etching primer.

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After cleaning and primer. On to the next part. This one has a lot of surface area, and with the solution already being dirty with oxides...it loads the power supply too much with it all the way in. I'll do most of it, then new solution and finish it off.

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I'm using non-conductive insulators at the bottom of the part to keep it from touching the anodes.

Edited by lostviking

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Well, I fried the power supply finishing that second part. Way too much load, although it was supposed to be protected from excess current. I guess that circuit didn't work all that well. I've got schematics and troubleshooting information specific to this supply, so I'll fix it...if it's not the input transformer. If that is damaged, it's not worth the repair cost.

 

The reason that second part hurt the supply is simply that is has a huge amount of surface area. The current increased due to this and just was too much for the poor old RS-4A to handle.

 

Luckily I work in electronics, and also I have a back up power supply. I ordered a high wattage (100Watt) 5-Ohm resistor because it was fairly inexpensive and over kill. I only calculated that I needed about 39Watts. Anyway got it today and wired it up to the spare supply. I am limiting to just under 2 Amps, so the 4 Amp supply won't get hurt.

 

I'll be back at it this weekend cleaning rust off my heater box.

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1948 Dodge B1D  in a barn since 84  washed out this “Arvin” heater and then blew all the mouse crap and lots of mud dauber nests. Replaced the bare wire lead and oiled the motor the best I could.  It runs well and the variable control knob lights up too.   Painted a little and clear coated he outside of the housing.   Exciting 

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