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RamblinMan63

Upcoming "51 S15 Build

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Hello,

 

I've managed to locate a fluid coupling and clutch pack for my 1951 DeSoto. It's coming out of Arizona. I've located a local machine shop who will do the block over. How do I know the displacement? I can post the code on the block if I have to. I have it torn down so I can measure the bore, piston, rods etc. I'd like to for sure know the displacement for the machine shop. I'm really excited and I cant wait to get this old girl on the road.

 

Where do guys get cloth covered wire for these rigs? I know it's in production because I've gotten it before for restoring antique tube radios. I just want to see if there's a larger scale supplier for automotive cloth wire.

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Rhode Island Wiring and others have this wire you are looking for and also make wiring looms for our Mopars.

Check them out on the internet.

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Your 51 DeSoto engine is a 251 (250) ci.

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Lets see, a few things to ponder...

 

1. If they did not place small wooden tapered blocks between the fluid coupling housing and the little flywheel on it and secure it with some bailing wire, there is a 50-50 chance that the carbon seal in the fluid coupling will be cracked and then leak. Before one removes a transmission on a fluid coupling car, one should put three little blocks in to keep the flywheel from "rocking" once the transmission input shaft is pulled back. A note from the folks at Northwest Transmission on a coupling I had them service 15 years ago told me to remove the blocks they put in for shipping. I called and they explained why they do that. Also, go searching through the threads to find my posting on the fluid drive fluid. You should clean your unit out and refill fill once it is in the car.

 

2. The engines on these cars were often swapped for a rebuilt one. The blocks on the Chrysler and Desoto's are all basically the same with only minor differences. The thing that decides what the engine final size will be is the crankshaft. There are three crankshafts for these blocks over the years. The 4-1/4 inch, the 4-1/2 inch, and the 4-3/4 inch. They are 237, 251, and 265 cubic in respectively.

 

3. I have never had good luck with the cloth wires. I also know several people who also have not had good luck with them. For a street car, not a #1 concourse car, I use (https://www.taylorvertex.com/spark-plugs/spiro-pro-universal-wire-sets/) the Taylor sets in black. Lacquer thinner takes off the white printing on the wire with one or two wipes. I have the same set on my 1947 Desoto now for 10 plus years. The 90 degree boots are nice for the flathead.  In the little round sections of the boot with the "T" in them, I out in little round paper with a dab of rubber cement with the plug number on it.

 

There is my 2 cents worth.

James.

 

 

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YnZ also sells wire and harnesses. They are in California. I have used their harnesses for three different cars and have always been more than satisfied. I am in no way connected to the company but am a very happy customer. https://www.ynzyesterdaysparts.com/

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9 hours ago, James_Douglas said:

Lets see, a few things to ponder...

 

1. If they did not place small wooden tapered blocks between the fluid coupling housing and the little flywheel on it and secure it with some bailing wire, there is a 50-50 chance that the carbon seal in the fluid coupling will be cracked and then leak. Before one removes a transmission on a fluid coupling car, one should put three little blocks in to keep the flywheel from "rocking" once the transmission input shaft is pulled back. A note from the folks at Northwest Transmission on a coupling I had them service 15 years ago told me to remove the blocks they put in for shipping. I called and they explained why they do that. Also, go searching through the threads to find my posting on the fluid drive fluid. You should clean your unit out and refill fill once it is in the car.

 

2. The engines on these cars were often swapped for a rebuilt one. The blocks on the Chrysler and Desoto's are all basically the same with only minor differences. The thing that decides what the engine final size will be is the crankshaft. There are three crankshafts for these blocks over the years. The 4-1/4 inch, the 4-1/2 inch, and the 4-3/4 inch. They are 237, 251, and 265 cubic in respectively.

 

3. I have never had good luck with the cloth wires. I also know several people who also have not had good luck with them. For a street car, not a #1 concourse car, I use (https://www.taylorvertex.com/spark-plugs/spiro-pro-universal-wire-sets/) the Taylor sets in black. Lacquer thinner takes off the white printing on the wire with one or two wipes. I have the same set on my 1947 Desoto now for 10 plus years. The 90 degree boots are nice for the flathead.  In the little round sections of the boot with the "T" in them, I out in little round paper with a dab of rubber cement with the plug number on it.

 

There is my 2 cents worth.

James.

 

 

What weight oil do you use in the semi auto transmissions? 80w90 gear oil? I'll look at your thread for the fluid coupling. Thank you

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7 hours ago, James_Douglas said:

10W non detergent motor oil.

For the semi automatic transmission??

 

Also I'm hopefully gonna score a set of Denman white walls that are listed local to me right now.

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17 hours ago, RamblinMan63 said:

For the semi automatic transmission??

 

Also I'm hopefully gonna score a set of Denman white walls that are listed local to me right now.

http://www.imperialclub.com/Repair/Lit/Master/012B/page09.htm

 

Bottom of page...

 

I suggest that you spend a few hours reading the booklets on the imperial site.

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On 1/9/2020 at 10:36 AM, James_Douglas said:

http://www.imperialclub.com/Repair/Lit/Master/012B/page09.htm

 

Bottom of page...

 

I suggest that you spend a few hours reading the booklets on the imperial site.

 

Thank you.

 

What other stuff can be done to bump up compression? I'll be having the head milled down and the block bored over. Is that about it or is there more?

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On 1/7/2020 at 9:21 AM, James_Douglas said:

Lets see, a few things to ponder...

 

1. If they did not place small wooden tapered blocks between the fluid coupling housing and the little flywheel on it and secure it with some bailing wire, there is a 50-50 chance that the carbon seal in the fluid coupling will be cracked and then leak. Before one removes a transmission on a fluid coupling car, one should put three little blocks in to keep the flywheel from "rocking" once the transmission input shaft is pulled back. A note from the folks at Northwest Transmission on a coupling I had them service 15 years ago told me to remove the blocks they put in for shipping. I called and they explained why they do that. Also, go searching through the threads to find my posting on the fluid drive fluid. You should clean your unit out and refill fill once it is in the car.

 

2. The engines on these cars were often swapped for a rebuilt one. The blocks on the Chrysler and Desoto's are all basically the same with only minor differences. The thing that decides what the engine final size will be is the crankshaft. There are three crankshafts for these blocks over the years. The 4-1/4 inch, the 4-1/2 inch, and the 4-3/4 inch. They are 237, 251, and 265 cubic in respectively.

 

3. I have never had good luck with the cloth wires. I also know several people who also have not had good luck with them. For a street car, not a #1 concourse car, I use (https://www.taylorvertex.com/spark-plugs/spiro-pro-universal-wire-sets/) the Taylor sets in black. Lacquer thinner takes off the white printing on the wire with one or two wipes. I have the same set on my 1947 Desoto now for 10 plus years. The 90 degree boots are nice for the flathead.  In the little round sections of the boot with the "T" in them, I out in little round paper with a dab of rubber cement with the plug number on it.

 

There is my 2 cents worth.

James.

 

 

 

James, I did some digging on the forums and found out a few things I was looking for. It seems the general pop here uses TDH tractor fluid in their couplings.

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On 1/14/2020 at 2:51 PM, RamblinMan63 said:

1. If they did not place small wooden tapered blocks between the fluid coupling housing and the little flywheel on it and secure it with some bailing wire, there is a 50-50 chance that the carbon seal in the fluid coupling will be cracked and then leak. Before one removes a transmission on a fluid coupling car, one should put three little blocks in to keep the flywheel from "rocking" once the transmission input shaft is pulled back. A note from the folks at Northwest Transmission on a coupling I had them service 15 years ago told me to remove the blocks they put in for shipping. I called and they explained why they do that. Also, go searching through the threads to find my posting on the fluid drive fluid. You should clean your unit out and refill fill once it is in the car.

Can you tell us the size of the little blocks/wedges? I'm having a mechanic swap engines for me and want to have them on hand for him to use.

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