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linus6948

Bucketlist Car For Me Aquired

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1 hour ago, RobertKB said:

 

Never heard of the aluminum foil and water method before. Going to have to give it a try! Does it work on stainless and chrome trim?

 

PS - I love inline six engines. I believe they are the best balanced of all engine configurations. All the big semis have inline sixes no matter who provides the engines. A little bigger than yours though. :lol:

Yes it works on those very well, it can`t scratch anything like steel wool does and always makes an improvement, it`s some sort of chemical reaction that occurs and the rust and tarnish just come off as gray water. Just keep replacing the wadded ball and changing the water, you can rub as hard as you can and no harm is done.

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Put a tach on the column today, it has the appropriate nostalgic look and works well.

 

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23 hours ago, linus6948 said:

Yes it works on those very well, it can`t scratch anything like steel wool does and always makes an improvement, it`s some sort of chemical reaction that occurs and the rust and tarnish just come off as gray water. Just keep replacing the wadded ball and changing the water, you can rub as hard as you can and no harm is done.

 

OK thanks.

 

Love the tach.

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My starter developed some dead spots and while tapping it with a ball-peen hammer to get it started reminded me of my teenage days it got old very fast and I had picked up a replacement last month as the starter looked to be original and sounded weak. The rebuilt starter works very well, I have dealt with many in the past which did not.

 

 

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Getting close to being road worthy again, now if Spring would just hurry up and arrive..

 

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My numbers matching 67 Malibu Sport Coupe with the 250 straight six. has been waiting a couple of months for the machine shop to have an opening to rebuild my engine.

I have a snap-on blue point engine hoist and it got the engine up a foot and then it suffered simultaneous seal failures in both the lift ram and the foot pump. It was spewing fluid like Jed Clampet`s oil well . I was forced to lower the motor back down push the car out of my shop and go old school in the driveway to get it out.

Of course I was working alone and it made for a very long day.

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The engine rebuilder was tickled to get the 250 and was looking forward to rebuilding it.The guy has a great reputation and I needed to be a friend of his friend to get the engine in to him.

I went online and found out repair parts are no longer available for this lift and everyone replaces their blown lift rams on these Blue Point lifts with an air driven one from harbor freight. It actually fit perfectly and works great for $80 with a coupon. So it`s back in service and I will be putting it back with the engine hoist.

 

Edited by linus6948

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1 hour ago, Plymouthy Adams said:

oh now HF bailing out Slap-on...tell me it is not so......lol  that lift does not look that old and certainly not abused in any manner...

This lift was sold by Snap-On for $1899.00 and featured the foot pump on the 8ft hose so you could work better alone by moving the pump where needed. I was the third owner of this lift and paid $200 for it from a mechanic friend of mine that no longer does engine swaps, he had paid $600 for it a few years back.

When it blew on me I did what I had to do but that night I was on the internet and discovered this was a common age-related problem with this lift and Snap-On no longer stocked the needed repair parts and their service centers no longer rebuilt them, a $200 job when they were still doing them. I found a blog by another guy with my lift that had the exact same experience as me and happily someone answered him about the HF 8ton ram everyone uses as a replacement. It can be hand pumped or air driven with a 6ft airhose with a trigger on the end so it also is easier to work alone with it and I don`t miss all the jack pumping.

Edited by linus6948

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My home-built hoist from 1973 finally gave out and got the HF jack a couple years ago. It replaced one I bought from the mil surplus yard, north of Ogden UT, and was genuine mil spec. Lasted 45 years in the desert heat. I don't expect the HF to go 5 years. I store this thing outdoors, but I suppose I could bring the ram inside. It's so big, and since I got the metal free from Uncle Sam, it weighs a ton.

 

 

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Beautiful car Linus. Always liked that year and body style along with the 67 GTO. Glad to see it survived the years and is in good hands.  

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@linus6948 congratulations!

The Chevelle is one of the most stylish cars from an era where they were getting overblown.

I had the '67 Belair and they were very solid cars.

 

Mine was an ex staff car from USU with 100k, needing paint, but no major rust, which was amazing, and pro maintained it's whole life. They probably drove a 4WD in the winter there. (I did.) It looked like an Arizona car, with the paint baked thru.

It cost me a used stereo I had paid $100 for. Ran like a dream from Utah to the Coast. I bought new tires in Nevada for $225.

 

I brought it to California, only to get hit in traffic, totaling the car. I got $300 from insurance and $80 from a junkyard.

I was unscathed, but for my ego. ;(

 

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Engine rebuilder finally called me in to see my dissembled motor and go over what he had found. I was amazed to find out my 1967 motor was  the newest one in the place. He was finishing up a 38 Plymouth six and in line behind mine was a 40`s Cadillac motor that arrived in several boxed and baskets. I also found out that the Quaker State oil of the 60`s and 70`s was the worst oil you could possibly use in your car. It has the highest paraffin wax content of any oil on the planet.

My motor was a textbook example of the premature damage and wear this oil caused back in the day and why this motor was done by 79,000 miles. Luckily the block, head-core, crank and piston rods are good, everything else gets new parts. Happily the replacement parts are readily available and not very expensive as engine parts go so I`m looking at about a $2100 bill for the rebuild. I was very impressed with this shop and the work they turn out there.

Edited by linus6948

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Really glad you are keeping the inline six in it. So many people "upgrade" to a V8.  I just love inline six engines. So does the trucking industry as most engines in semis are inline six diesels. I have heard from many sources that the inline six is the best naturally balanced engine design.

 

I have a friend who did a cross Canada tour of Canada both ways (nearly 10,000 miles) in a 1962 Chevrolet pulling a small trailer. The old inline six, with a lot of miles, ran perfectly with no issues. They have pretty good torque.

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