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'51 Chrysler T & C Wagon


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Need to do a tooth count on the flywheels and compare. Later models had a different tooth count /overall flywheel dia.?? and will not directly interchange if diff.

 

If earliest if may work after your comparison.  Other forum members may have more specific info but comparisons will confirm . 6 volt starters work just fine in place of 12v. if tooth counts/

bellhousing depths do not also get changed. That will have to also be checked as to depth of the ring gears from the block by each flywheel . My seem to be a lot to check but really just basic measure/count/ compare.

 

Should be a nice change!

 

DJ

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It's no guarantee but I've budged a few "stuck" motors with the long prybar on the flywheel teeth trick...pulled the flywheel cover off, then rested the prybar on the bell housing to leverage against

Here's a pic from when i first got it.   

Some guys liked to use a light spring when lapping in the valves. It lifts them momentarily so they don't just go back and forth in the same spot. Could be the guy had to answer the phone or went

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Thanks DJ, b/c of the way I'm doing this the old engine i still in the car so measuring counting teeth is tough. Looks like it will be an issue for the future. Once the old engine is out and I can see what's what. It just dawned on me that the flywheel is attached to the fluid drive...so this ind flywheel is no good for me. Ha! [slaps forehead]. 

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On 1/4/2020 at 11:00 AM, Greg51T&CWagon said:

I'm starting to pull the wiring and label to replace. It's in horrendous shape in the engine compartment but not bad behind the dash. In any case I'm replacing most of it. I'd like to do this without removing the dash and also without working upside down. The plan is to remove all the switches from the dash (lights ign etc) and pull the main cluster. dropping the wiring from under the dash. Labeling as I go. The wire that ran to the solenoid  was a bare wire for most of its run!  I've ordered cloth covered wire from Rhode Island Harnesses.

Here's a shot of the registration tag on the firewall. it was hidden behind a caddie brake booster that had been added when the original went bad. 

 

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Hey Greg,

Did you ever try to get your data plate decoded? I don't know if there is a resource online that would tell us what all the numbers mean. When I was helping my son with his '53 Buick, we were able to decode it from the Buick site...of course! 

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No, I haven't done that yet. I've looked around but only a cursory search. I have the build card from Chrysler, It says I have a taxi package which I guess means heavier springs and brakes? Not sure.

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Picked up the rebuilt 265 from George Asche yesterday afternoon. Stored it at the garage that will drop it in for me. I want to get the dash back in with new wiring first and maybe cover the front seat first too. Feels good to have this major step taken care of. Visiting George's place is always a treat. It's a bit overwhelming, everywhere you look are little gems in the maze of buildings on his property.

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

I tried using the moldable craft board "taskboard" recommended on another thread about repairing a heater duct to patch some cracks and a mouse hole in mine. I first cleaned and then sprayed my duct with aerosol rubber coating - the stuff hawked on TV. Then formed the patches with the damp board which was very easy to do even on an inside compound curve. Once the patch would sort of set to the curve, I coated both surfaces with rubber cement and applied the patch.  I've now sprayed the patched areas again with the rubber spray. I used the rubber spray b/c I wanted it to be basically encapsulated so moisture would not be a problem. I might line the inside with a thin self adhesive heat resistant aluminum foil/insulation. Once it dries I'll add some photos.

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3 hours ago, Greg51T&CWagon said:

I tried using the moldable craft board "taskboard" recommended on another thread about repairing a heater duct to patch some cracks and a mouse hole in mine. I first cleaned and then sprayed my duct with aerosol rubber coating - the stuff hawked on TV. Then formed the patches with the damp board which was very easy to do even on an inside compound curve. Once the patch would sort of set to the curve, I coated both surfaces with rubber cement and applied the patch.  I've now sprayed the patched areas again with the rubber spray. I used the rubber spray b/c I wanted it to be basically encapsulated so moisture would not be a problem. I might line the inside with a thin self adhesive heat resistant aluminum foil/insulation. Once it dries I'll add some photos.

Great work! pictures please!

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56 minutes ago, Greg51T&CWagon said:

So here it is before the final coat of flex seal. 

greg

 

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Brillant!

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Thanks Bob. I think one could actually make a replacement duct with this stuff. Use a good one as a buck to form it over, coat it inside and out with the rubber stuff. Also the under dash duct. 

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