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So i inherited my granpas 1952 dodge B2B, and it runs and drives... sort of. It drives fine as long as i can get it to accelerate. Im new to these flathead 6s, but have a basic understanding of them. So i can get it to idle just fine, starts on usually 2-4 cranks, depending on temp. Once i get it idling and warmed up, or even cold, when i give it gas to try to move it, it stalls like its being starved for fuel. Adjusted the carb, and it does the same thing no matter how little/much fuel i set it to. Not sure if somethings stuck in there? Also am going to look at points/distributor cap/spark plugs/wires today, but im curious if anyone has had this happen and what did you do to fix it?

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First off, welcome to the family...

 

The first thing to check is the accelerator pump in the carburetor. Remove the air filter and look down the carb with a flashlight while moving the throttle linkage. When you open the throttle, as in stepping on the pedal, you should see a squirt of fuel from the accelerator pump jet. If not, then you'll need to open up the carb and clean out that circuit. May as well get a kit and do the whole carb at that point.

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If that truck has been parked awhile, check to see if the distributor advance plate is not stuck...I experienced a frozen plate on my first Dodge resurrection where the weights would not move, so the engine idled fine but I couldn't accelerate on the road...this stuck plate caused damage to the vacuum advance by tearing the rotting diaphragm...I would eventually send that distributor to Burton L. Norton for their rebuild service as they had access to good replacements parts and a Sun Machine to check and adjust everything to specs...cost a hefty sack of pennies back in "99, but I haven't needed to do anything other than annual lubrication and check adjustments since...

 

grey beard had some good info on distributors... :cool:

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So i did some work on it the past two days looking at some stuff i thought it might be mixed with yalls advice. I went ahead and replaced the ignition coil, spark plugs and wires. Its been 14 years since those were replaced, so it wouldnt hurt. Turns out that had little to no effect. I adjusted the setting on the accelerator pump from winter to summer and adjusted the idle and that had a large change. It still stutters but if i give it slow acceleration i can actually get it to stay alive. I think i still need to do a carb rebuild as well as drain/replace the fuel and filter. No telling how long that gas has been sitting. Maybe once thats done i can get it to take off on a hill. 

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Old gas makes a world of difference. Change the gas and then add some seafoam. I have almost 30 small and large engines for my business. We put seafoam in them and some engines will sit for over a year. Very seldom it takes more than one pull to start any of my engines. 

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I don't really have an answer for you on the rebuild kits or carbs but I would suggest filling a 5 gallon can with gas, adding in a can (or two) of Sea Foam and then run a line from your fuel pump inlet to the gas can.  I've solved more carburetor problem this way that I have rebuilding them.  I've found Sea Foam to be a really good product.

 

Brad

 

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Thanks everyone! My grampa said he had hardened valves put in it so he could run unleaded 100% gas, so i gotta track some down, probably local marina is the closest. I would love to run pump gas but thats a s*** ton of work replacing stuff so ill just suffer for now.

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32 minutes ago, 1952RedB2B said:

Thanks everyone! My grampa said he had hardened valves put in it so he could run unleaded 100% gas, so i gotta track some down, probably local marina is the closest. I would love to run pump gas but thats a s*** ton of work replacing stuff so ill just suffer for now.

 

If it's the original flat head 6 engine it came from the factory with hardened valve seats. If work was done and the seats were replaced with other hardened ones there's nothing special you need to do. It should run fine on any pump gas available in your town. I tend to run mid-grade or premium in my truck as I feel it runs slightly better. But it still runs just fine on regular old 87 unleaded with 10% ethanol.

However, I would caution you about running 10% ethanol fuel if you don't have a fuel pump and hoses that have modern rubber in them. It will kill older rubber components.

If in doubt get a fuel pump rebuild kit from the good folks at Antique Auto Parts Cellar. http://www.then-now-auto.com/fuel-pumps/

 

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17 hours ago, Merle Coggins said:

 

If it's the original flat head 6 engine it came from the factory with hardened valve seats. If work was done and the seats were replaced with other hardened ones there's nothing special you need to do. It should run fine on any pump gas available in your town. I tend to run mid-grade or premium in my truck as I feel it runs slightly better. But it still runs just fine on regular old 87 unleaded with 10% ethanol.

However, I would caution you about running 10% ethanol fuel if you don't have a fuel pump and hoses that have modern rubber in them. It will kill older rubber components.

If in doubt get a fuel pump rebuild kit from the good folks at Antique Auto Parts Cellar. http://www.then-now-auto.com/fuel-pumps/

 

Interestingly, for me, I run only premium, ethanol free, gas, in all three of my old vehicles, and all power equipment, including generator, mowers, trimmer, weedwacker, chainsaw, and have not had starting nor running problems. 👍

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The rebuild is worth a try but I LOVED the repop weber 32/36 I put on there from the stovebolt website. Electric choke (so 12v neg ground) worked fantastic and it started and ran like it was fuel injected. 

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I had a similar hesitation on my dad’s 40 Plymouth. Rebuilt the carb,but no shot from the accel pump. Tuns out there is a tiny jet at the top of the carb w a removable cap on it. Inside that cap was a plugged jet that had to be opened. Up (I used an old banjo string).  I also soaked the new plunger in oil for a while to soften the leather before installing it.  Runs fine now.   Good luck

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In my case, it started and ran fantastic, but terrible stumbling with the clutch out and stepping into the gas. Had a blast rebuilding the carb - so easy and fun because it made me feel like a real mechanic that afternoon 😌 End result was the hesitation was completely gone.  If anyone needs to rebuild the carb, do it in the kitchen when your wife is out 🤣

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