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JSabah

Electric fuel pump

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Ive deleted the mechanical fuel pump as it was too close to my new duel exhaust manifold. So I will be installing a new inline pump (12v). I’m planing on having it in the inside if the frame as far back to the tank as possible but keeping it below the tank. Between the tank and pump, have an inline filter (maybe a secondary filter closer to the engine as well. Now for my questions:

1)original fuel line was 5/16 for which I bought replacement already. The pump looks like it has 1/4” inlet/outlet. Can I just get an adapter and keep my 5/16” line.  

 

2) is there a power source nearby connected to the ignition to power the pump or do I need to run new wires from the dash - I have a new wiring harness and sure hate to tape additional wires to it. Can I get power from the fuel sending unit? Brake light switch ?

 

Thank you

 

 

 

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You don't want to use anything less than 5/16 " line . Find an auto parts store that has a good selection of fittings to see what fits . Find a power source that doesn't have much voltage drop . 

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I removed the mechanical pump and installed a 6v Carter pump just ahead of the rear axle. The same pump is also available for 12v and I ran one of those for many years on my kit-car.

 

fuel-pump.jpg.76a1ac43d57590819d096eb9f9f52d7c.jpg

 

A 3/8" steel-braided hose connects the new tank to the pump, the rubber hose connects the pump to the new 5/16" fuel line to the carb. I ran a wire from the ignition switch back to the pump, it has a 10a in-line fuse at the switch. The pump works great and no regulator has been needed. I didn't want the pump piggy-backed onto any other circuit since this car is now electric pump dependent.

Edited by Sam Buchanan

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No, what I meant by tape is - along the fabric sheathing from the ignition ... if I tap into the harness it will be with crimped splices to bullet or spade connectors 

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51 minutes ago, JSabah said:

No, what I meant by tape is - along the fabric sheathing from the ignition ... if I tap into the harness it will be with crimped splices to bullet or spade connectors 

Awesome!

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For safety's sake, you should have a cutoff switch to shut off the electric fuel pump if the engine is not running.  I used an oil pressure switch.  I also had a momentary contact switch to power the pump for priming the carb. 

 

383242267_fuelpumpwiring.JPG.48d829b13743f18812bd5bcac9014b92.JPG   

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1 hour ago, DonaldSmith said:

For safety's sake, you should have a cutoff switch to shut off the electric fuel pump if the engine is not running.  I used an oil pressure switch.  I also had a momentary contact switch to power the pump for priming the carb. 

 

383242267_fuelpumpwiring.JPG.48d829b13743f18812bd5bcac9014b92.JPG   

 

I understand where you are coming from with your wiring architecture and I considered something similar when converting my P15 to the electric fuel pump. However, examination of the wiring diagram with pressure switch, momentary switch, etc reveals a host of potential failure points. Loss of connectivity at any of those points means the car is dead on the side of the road (or in an intersection!). I decided to keep the pump circuit as simple as possible to reduce single-points-of-failure to the minimum. Priming the carb is no issue since the pump is energized as soon as the key is turned on. The inline fuse can be pulled (easily reached under the dash beside the ignition switch) if maintenance is needed with the car powered up.

 

Every vehicle is a compromise.....I decided to put priority on reliability.  :)

Edited by Sam Buchanan

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49 minutes ago, Sam Buchanan said:

 

I understand where you are coming from with your wiring architecture and I considered something similar when converting my P15 to the electric fuel pump. However, examination of the wiring diagram with pressure switch, momentary switch, etc reveals a host of potential failure points. Loss of connectivity at any of those points means the car is dead on the side of the road (or in an intersection!). I decided to keep the pump circuit as simple as possible to reduce single-points-of-failure to the minimum. Priming the carb is no issue since the pump is energized as soon as the key is turned on. The inline fuse can be pulled (easily reached under the dash beside the ignition switch) if maintenance is needed with the car powered up.

 

Every vehicle is a compromise.....I decided to put priority on reliability.  :)

 

I hope that if you are ever in an accident you are conscious and alert enough to pull that easily reached fuse before you and your passengers burn.

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10 minutes ago, TodFitch said:

 

I hope that if you are ever in an accident you are conscious and alert enough to pull that easily reached fuse before you and your passengers burn.

 

Me too! (Turning off the ignition accomplishes same thing as pulling the fuse)

 

We all have varying degrees of risk tolerance. Driving an old car (no crash protection, steering column pointed at your chest, ancient brakes, etc...) in modern traffic is a risk in itself regardless of what kind of fuel system is used......

Edited by Sam Buchanan

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JSabah--

 

One idea.

94-04 Ford OEM Electric Fuel Pump Gas Shut Off Inertia Safety Switch

Pre-Owned
  • $18.99
  • Buy It Now
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Use something like this for accident protection. Just wire to the inline power wire to the electric fuel pump. Mount in and easily accessible place. Most originally were in the trunk side panel.

 

To your question about the wire to the fuel  level sender. There is no power there, it is only one wire that is a variable ground.

Yes you will need to get your ignition power under the dash with a new long wire. I suggest running the wire inside the car body all the way to the rear on car and drill one hole and insert a rubber grommet close to the pump and run wire down to pump under the car.

Just one opinion.

DJ

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40 minutes ago, JD luxury liner said:

inertia safety switch !

best $10 bucks I spent  at my local pickapart . 

also has an extra wire for an idiot light to let you know it has tripped.

snoopy & flag.png

Have you had a crash to confirm it works?   🙄

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6 hours ago, maok said:

Have you had a crash to confirm it works?   🙄

 

Now don't go inserting logic into this discussion........   😉

Edited by Sam Buchanan

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there is no guarantee that after x years/miles any single device is going to perform as to it's specific design and parameters....but....it is always best to try to err on the side of safety....there is no negative argument for inserting a inertia safety switch unless you wish to account for just being plain cheap and or lazy...

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2 hours ago, Plymouthy Adams said:

there is no guarantee that after x years/miles any single device is going to perform as to it's specific design and parameters....but....it is always best to try to err on the side of safety....there is no negative argument for inserting a inertia safety switch unless you wish to account for just being plain cheap and or lazy...

 

Saying anyone who doesn't agree with our own opinion is merely cheap and/or lazy is a.........cheap and lazy argument.......

 

I have no problems with anyone who wishes to install an inertia switch, just keep in mind they are known for reliability issues and false trips. That is why they have an easily accessed reset button. They also need to be installed so the inertia of a sudden stop will trip the switch....oh wait....some accidents involve hits from the side, or rear......and the primitive suspensions on our old cars can transfer road irregularities from all directions....

 

Guess we better install airbags while we are at it.......  ;)

Edited by Sam Buchanan

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27 minutes ago, Sam Buchanan said:

 

Saying anyone who doesn't agree with our own opinion is merely cheap and/or lazy is a.........cheap and lazy argument.......

 

 

or...…………....direct and to the point...:lol:  

 

I was supporting the guy who goes the extra step and trying to provide some degree of safety to himself, family and general public at large....there are many who know up front but yet will choose not to go an inch beyond minimum safety given they take any regard at all but in turn mock those that are a bit proactive in safety.  To this end....it is often the issue of cost or laziness of that person choice not to do better, maybe I could dial in a lack of concern or ignorance....aim for the low hanging branch and achieve just that...shoot for the moon and if you miss....you efforts should at least get recognized despite banging your head against the 110th wall of a 112 floor skyscraper.  Your post advocates safety....surely you have concern for those motorist around you that do not...

Edited by Plymouthy Adams

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Inertia switch story.

Twenty years ago, one workday morning, my daughter and her infant daughter left to return home after a visit.  My wife left for work, and I was about to leave.

Suddenly, I felt really tired, and decided to sit in the recliner for a while.  After resting for a few minutes, i received a call from my daughter on a borrowed cellphone.

She was parked on the shoulder of a nearby expressway.  Someone had bumped the rear of her car, not enough to do damage, but enough to disable her car. 

Inertia switch, of course. 

I drove to her location, and pushed the reset button.  Grand-daughter in the baby seat slept through the whole event.  I bade them good-bye and safe trip.  

Had I not received the call, gone there, and known enough to reset the inertial switch,  my daughter may have become the victim of an unscrupulous tow-truck operator,  performing many phantom services before pushing the button.

Was my sudden fatigue divine providence, or just chance?  Forrrest Gump philosophy:  It's both, I think it's both.              

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Made mine from a piece of scrap steel plate (think it was 1/8"), you can see it in this photo. Use the gasket as a pattern....cut...drill...done.  :)

 

stripped-nut-4.jpg.dd6a9284dbd020bd1cd22cc4fc4b7e8a.jpg

Edited by Sam Buchanan

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