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Sam Buchanan

Installing a Spin-on Bypass Oil Filter (photos)

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In a previous thread the discussion was centered around whether or not a bypass filter is needed and the best oil for our mature engines. Based on that discussion and pondering this topic for a few days after pulling the oil pan I decided to install a spin-on filter on my non-filtered engine. I've seen a couple of photos on the forum of filter installations but decided to offer a more complete tutorial for the benefit of owners who may want to explore a filter installation.

 

I chose a mount and filter from Wix because they offer a mount and selection of filters that are specifically for bypass operation. Bypass filters are constructed differently from full-flow filters and provide a finer degree of filtration than conventional filters. I sourced the mount and filter from Rock Auto who have not only the filter I use but also the same filter in three additional lengths. I selected the next to shortest due to the confined space around the engine.

 

Here is the mount, part number WIX 24755:

 

filter-2.jpg.d2b0eb8698d71c412ca2bee344510871.jpg

 

Note the arrows indicating the proper direction of flow. This mount is only for bypass installations and has a small 5/8" nipple instead of the more common 3/4" seen on full-flow installations. It also has 1/8" NPT threads that allow 3/16" steel brake lines to be attached with only one 90* adapter.            

 

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The filter is WIX 51051:

 

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The other Wix bypass filters that fit this mount are 51050, 51320, and 51704.

 

A bracket must be fabricated to attach the mount to the engine block. I used 1/8" steel and drilled it for the mount and two studs on the engine head:

 

 

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The two fittings on the engine accept 3/16" brake lines with no modification. I found 12" lines to be ideal for this installation. Accessing the fittings and getting the threads straight deep in the engine compartment is kinda tedious....just consider it a character-building experience. Permatex #2 (non-hardening) gasket sealer was used on the brass fitting where they screwed in the filter mount. I've seen teflon tape used in situations like this but that is risky in oil systems unless you really know what you are doing. A small sliver of tape that breaks loose can create havoc if it plugs an oil passage.

 

A couple of thick washers are behind the bracket to provide clearance for the heads of the bolts securing the filter mount. The threads in the cylinder head are common 3/8" and the nuts on the studs are 3/8" fine thread. One of the studs backed out so I replaced it with a bolt.

 

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Prior to installing the filter I filled it with oil. This photo shows the difference between a bypass filter and full-flow---notice the tiny holes through which oil flows in/out of the filter. Filling the filter was very tedious....if I had to do this very often I would rig up some sort of syringe to push oil into the filter instead of spending 1/2 hour adding oil a fraction of an ounce at a time. The filter accepted a cupful of oil before it was satisfied.

 

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The finished installation complete with a note on the mileage and date of filter change. The oil lines need to be formed for clearance so the filter can be easily changed.

 

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Yes, this is not for those who want a period-correct engine bay, but I like having a modern filter which can be easily sourced through common channels. If my engine is happy....I'm happy.   :)

 

 

 

Edited by Sam Buchanan

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Nice write up! Thanks for posting.

 

I still have a number of the old disposable bypass filters to use up before I need to look for alternatives, your setup looks pretty good to me.

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Looks great Sam, nice job on the bracket.

 

I was strongly thinking about doing exactly the same thing, (replacing my cannister oil filter housing with a Wix spin on, same exact part numbers you have used here),...as I need to (at a minimum) replumb my old cannister filter with hard metal lines to replace the hoses that the previous owners had used to plumb the in/out flow to and from the cannister to the block, and I had thought that doing the change to a modern spin on filter would be a good, in-expensive, upgrade.

 

Then I got a little spooked when I read some reviews on folks claiming to have received filter brackets from Wix that were poorly machined when manufactured. It wasn't here on the forum, but out on the internet when searching for reviews. Some were stating that they received filter brkts that were not built square in relation to where the filter threads on, and the gasket sealing area, so the filter would not seal. Others however were worse, and I saw more of this same second bad review repeated several times, and that being. The threads on the large threaded tube where the filter spins on were uneven, jagged, sharp, etc,...enough so that when the filter was attached to the bracket they were claiming it was damaging the threads on the oll filter itself and actually pulling metal filings from the female filter threads that they felt would end up inside the engine.

 

After reading that crap, I thought well - there's no way for me to know if these reviews are legit, and/or if actually true, were those rare instances. Hummmm, I suppose one could get past this concern once the bracket and filter were in hand, by screwing the thing together and then taking it apart to check for fitment and/or any signs of metal glitter. I've screwed enough filters on in my life, I suppose I could possible tell by just the feel of it..

 

At this point I thought about how every time I do an oil change on our modern cars, and I loosen the filter,..and you get that immediate spillage of oil when the gasket seal is broken that you put your drain pan underneath to catch, wait on to stop, then wipe clean with your rag ang go ahead and remove the filter. With the starter directly underneath I began to wonder if the spin on by-pass filter would be nearly as messy. Without any anti drain back valves in the top of the by pass filter it might not be nearly as prone to spill over like a conventional filter does,  to the point where just a rag or two underneath the filter to cover the starter would be plenty enough to keep oil off the starter, so maybe not an issue at all. ..I don't know ??

 

All this had me to the point where I thought I might just be better off to stay with the old design, where you remove the filter lid and lift the old cartridge out. 

 

Your thoughts or ( anyone else out there who's had experience with oil spillage associated with removing a modern spin on by-pass filer installed on the side of the engine block above the starter), would be appreciated. 

 

thanks

 

Steve.

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Steve, thank you for the read and kind comments.

 

I'm reminded of the old adage...."Paralysis by Analysis"........   

 

The Wix filter mount I have appears to be well machined and no operational issues have popped up. If the casting was defective it would be apparent when test fitting a filter on the bench. It really is a simple component, not much to go wrong. The nipple threads are smooth on the adapter I have and the gasket engages evenly.

 

If oil spillage is a concern, just place a plastic bag around the filter when you initially unscrew it, any excess oil will drain into the bag instead of on the starter that has 70+ years of crud on it.......  ;)

 

The original canister filter is certainly a proven design, however, I don't see any operational downsides to the Wix filter installation.........probably best to find something else to worry about.  :)

Edited by Sam Buchanan

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Thank's Sam I appreciate your kind and courteous reply back. 

 

Without a doubt, my biggest handicap with all this (restoration work) has been made evident over the past few years (especially to myself) in regards to how badly I can over analyze things, and in the process very often just " not see the forest for the trees". Trying to do better with it. Man old habits are hard to break.

 

I do want you to please know, I would never try to be a smarty with anything I write or say here on the forum, (it honestly was a sincere however maybe misguided concern on my part) in regards to the oil spillage. I think your simple idea of a plastic bag, sturdy enough and stout enough to handle some hot oil, is about as good a suggestion as anyone could make, and 1st grade simple to boot.  ( Again the "forest for the trees thing raises it's ugly head" ).

 

I thought I was a pretty good wrench, when I started this project almost 5 years ago, however soon I realized how much of a "good parts replacer I had been over the years".  

 

One things for sure, my project would be no where near what or where it is today, without the help I've received here on this forum.  I really appreciate the patience extended my way from everyone.

 

Steve

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On 7/13/2019 at 4:19 PM, Frank Elder said:

Great job!

Sam just in case you didn't know the Napa brand filter is manufactured by Wix and is identical.

Even the same #s. You drop the 5 for Napa and either get a 1051 or a 21051. One is the gold line  

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57 minutes ago, Young Ed said:

Napa brand filter is manufactured by Wix and is identical.

Not only are they the same, wix makes some high quality filters.

I would assume their other products are also of high quality.

Is a youtube vide I watched, where they cut open a new fram, wix, napa filter. I was impressed how much garbage the fram was compared to wix.

Fram actually had cardboard inside the filter .... Glad my local parts store carries wix filters .... I sometimes buy oil from walmart, not filters.

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16 hours ago, 3046moparcoupe said:


One things for sure, my project would be no where near what or where it is today, without the help I've received here on this forum.  I really appreciate the patience extended my way from everyone.

 

Likewise! The hours reading the forum archives has been a tremendous resource for my project.

Edited by Sam Buchanan

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1 hour ago, Young Ed said:

Even the same #s. You drop the 5 for Napa and either get a 1051 or a 21051. One is the gold line  

 

Found the Napa Gold 1051 on Napaonline, the longer version is 1050. However, they are twice the price as the WIX filters on Rock Auto. But there is shipping so the price difference may be moot if the Napa filters are available locally.

Edited by Sam Buchanan

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Have 2 local parts store in my small town. A car quest, and a parts plus .... they both carry wix filters.

parts plus is my main squeeze, even if not in stock, they usually get it delivered next day.

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20 hours ago, 3046moparcoupe said:

I think your simple idea of a plastic bag, sturdy enough and stout enough to handle some hot oil, is about as good a suggestion as anyone could make, and 1st grade simple to boot. 

 

I've found puppy training pads to be a nice addition to the shop when working with old vehicles that aren't completely housebroken:

 

fa39c3df-1805-4b6f-8e09-45df7cbed8b4._CR

They can be cut up into smaller pieces to catch drips and dribbles when an oil filter is changed. I keep one under the P15's transmission that insists on marking its territory in spite of my training efforts.... :)

 

Also works for me if I'm in the middle of a repair job I just can't turn loose of !!?!!   😆

 

 

Edited by Sam Buchanan

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I wonder if they make an adapter for those members who have Full Flow oil filtration on some 251s and 265s?

Not this DeVal jobbie.....although it is well executed.

IMG_2201.jpg

I would rather have 1 like Sam's......

filter-5.jpg

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A great modification that's been around for years. I did it to my 48 Plymouth 25 years ago and my 47 Plymouth 15 years ago. Mine uses a common Ford V8 filter. No more draining out the filter canister with a turkey baster. Lol

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I used the Wix mount and found several new filters for it on ebay for a reasonable price. I found that after you pull the drain plug on the oil pan, let the engine set for a day before removing the filter and I get no oil slopping down the sides of the filter.

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