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keithb7

New Car Day! 1938 P6 Plymouth Deluxe

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Did the deal on this one today.

1938 P6. Great known history. Solid car. Original interior. D24 engine installed but comes with original P6 engine needing rebuild. Lots of spare parts! Good runner. Test drove it. Looking forward to getting into this car. No plans other than make it reliable, road worthy and safe. 

 

Picked up in Victoria BC Canada. I will trailer it home next Saturday. 

 

 

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Awesome!! I knew you'd pull the trigger Keith!  Happy that you're going to leave it as is.  What a great acquisition for you.  I'd love to see it in person someday and ride shotgun.  

The pre-war cars are truly special.  Congrats, and keep us updated 👍

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Keith, Your 1938 Plymouth looks really good,glad to hear you bought it. It's in good hands...Bonus - getting spare parts including the original engine and the cars history as well.😊

Edited by T120

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Thanks guys. I am pretty excited  and elated about securing this car. It’s a 1938! That floors me.  It needs some work but it flashed up in 1/2 a second and purred so nicely.  To make it driveable shouldn’t take too much. Inspect brakesnew park brake cable. New battery. A good general cleaning.  Some wire clean up. Service all fluids. Lots more to come!

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Great looking car. Usually don't care for sedans but this model has a stylish rear end.

Owing a pre-war is cool, you never meet another at rallies and meets 😉

Glad you're planning to keep it original. 👍

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I didn’t sleep well in the hotel room last nite. Too wound up about the car I think. It seems these moments of “child-like excitement at Christmas”, happen too rarely in life as we age. I am there today. 

 

Some new to me is interesting stuff to learn about 1938 technology.  

 

The starter has a rod that comes thru the firewall. It seems that you turn on the key power, you push the rod, manually engaging the starter somehow. Is that right?  When the owner started the car, I was taking in a lot of info at the time.  

 

The D24 engine in the car now is slightly longer than the stock block. So the rad was moved forward slightly to accomodate it. I was told that this was completed back in 1966. The original engine has been held with the car all that time. The head was found to br cracked, I was told. That head is long gone. Whenever I get to rebuilding the original engine I’ll need a head.  I believe it to be a 201ci engine. I’ll keep an eye out for one. Looking in the cylinders of this original ,engine I was mildly amused at the bore. Quite a bit smaller than my 265.  All the original parts are still there in boxes from the  engine  swap and rad move. Lots more stuff too, fortunately. 

 

The car had been sitting unstarted for several months. A little fuel in the carb and it fired up immediately and purred smoothly as these flatheads are known for.  An electric fuel pump has been installed. 

 

I was happy to see that all the gauges worked too.  The coolant temp gauge is labeled “heat” I think. Factory lettering. Lol. Good amps, and engine oil pressure reading. 

 

An interesting little bolt-in am radio was attached under the dash on the driver’s side. I have never seen one of these before. Looking at it I’d guess it may be a 1950’s aftermarket purchase? It sort of resembles the shape of a modern electric brake controller, mounted similarly. Appears to be a self contained unit. Thinking about it now, it seemed a little small to house tubes. Maybe it does. I can’t check it right now. I’ll post pics when I get the car home and start working on it. It’ll be another week likely before I get it home. 

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Keith, that's a direct drive starter.  My 56 flat fender Power Wagon had the same.  Also had the same "heat" labeled temp guage.  

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23 hours ago, Worden18 said:

Awesome!!  I'd love to see it in person someday and ride shotgun.  

 

Worden if we ever cross paths surely you’ll be driving, and I’ll be grinnin’ while shot gunnin’.  T’would be an honor!

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Great looking '38 Plymouth. Nice color too. It's an early '38 model because of the placement of the headlights. Later in the year, the headlights were relocated a little further back and slightly lower (see attached photo of a later '38). I think either style looked nice. Drive it and enjoy.

John R

th.jpg

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On 5/19/2019 at 11:49 AM, Worden18 said:

Keith, that's a direct drive starter.  My 56 flat fender Power Wagon had the same.  Also had the same "heat" labeled temp guage.  

That's correct. Your foot pressing the rod in is actually acting as the solenoid. Plymouth used this type in their cars up to and including 1942.

John R

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Is this a Canadian built car? I know in '38 all Canadian cars and trucks started coming with the long block engine. As yours is an early '38 it may have had the shorter 23" engine originally. I am not sure when the longer 25" engine became standard in 1938. Always very easy to pick up an engine for any car from 1938 on as anything fits. I have a flathead from a 1955 3-ton grain truck in my Canadian built 1948 Dodge D25 Club Coupe.

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My ‘38 is indeed a Canadian built car. It is an earlier release. It shipped with the shorter block. 200 CI. engine 

 

It currently has a longer block D54 stamped engine in the car. Rad was moved forward about 2” I believe to accommodate. 

Edited by keithb7

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I recognize the car.  For over 40 years,  it belonged to a fellow named Murray Noel who owned it from about 1960 to fairly recently when he   reluctantly  sold it because he can no longer drive.  I also know who installed the newer engine ( many years ago)   and I believe he used a Chevrolet truck radiator.   I will pass the word down the line that the car now has a good home,  Murray thought that it would likely be resold after it was put back in running condition.  Should you decide to re install the original engine I have a cylinder head. and a radiator.   In the meanwhile, enjoy it the way it is.   Seems to me the upholstery needed attention,     If you want more info, you may send me a PM.

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You are very accurate @dpollo. Thank you for sharing your knowledge on this car. The original radiator and related parts are still with the car. The interior is original and yes needs work. 

 

My goal is to pick away at the car and slowly bring it back. Initially I’ll focus on the mechanics. Make it reliable and safe. Then I’ll get into the interior and body/paint. 

 

No hurry here. It’ll be a longer project that I’ll savor. Likely driving it along most of the the way.  I will need a head as I hope to rebuild the original engine. I’ll dig into that once I get everything home here. 

Edited by keithb7

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Small world, Possibly the same Murray Noel that lived in Saanich, B.C. on Vancouver Island and graduated from the same High School as I did around that time..

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That would be your man.   Grad year about 1962.

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1 hour ago, dpollo said:

That would be your man.   Grad year about 1962.

Murray graduated in 1960. Interesting that he kept the old Plymouth through the years...

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I called Murray this morning to introduce myself and update him on his car. I thanked him for taking good care of it since the mid-60’s. 

 

Murray sold the car in the fall of 2018 he said. To a local fellow. This fellow go it running again then listed it for sale. Which is when I entered into the scene. 

 

Putting a few puzzle pieces together I have somewhat of a time line. 

 

Original owner bought the car brand new. In Victoria BC in 1938. Owner had at least one daughter. Fast forward to the mid-60’s. The original owner passed. His daughter listed the car for sale at that time.  Murray Noel bought it then.  Now, we know Murray graduated in 1960. So he would have been about 17 years old then. Add 5 years to 1965 , Murray bought this Plymouth when he was about 22-23 years old. He kept it all these years. Recently having to sell it due to complications that come with age. 

 

Next, I think I can track down the original owner’s name. Sounds like they should likely have deep roots in the Victoria area.  More to come on that. 

 

Murray said he had a “splash’n dash” paint job put on the car some time ago. He needed to store it outdoors for a while. He hoped the paint would help protect it. It must have helped some. 

 

Murray was nice and answered all my questions. I think he feels ok with the car in my hands. I told him dpollo sent me his way. He laughed. Sound to me like dpollo is well known in those parts of the island. 

 

A new chapter begins. Saturday we depart at 5 AM for the car’s next journey to my home.  I cannot wait to get it home. 

Edited by keithb7

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Keith, you have the match to my '38 D10. Love the car drives like a dream, she does have modern radials and a modern rear end. My go to vintage ride.

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