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joecoozie

Just HAD to buy this one....

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Double wow! Can't even imagine what you paid! The rear bumper, likes of which I've never seen before, is stunning! 

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wow what a car , was working on a 49 Plymouth myself yesterday,got it running after headgasket and spark issues drove it around for about 3 hours last night I don't want to give it back lol

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Welcome. Really nice find. More details and pictures please.

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12 hours ago, Ajgkirkwood said:

Omfg how did you find this

Thanks for all the positive comments.

It was in an Estate Auction and, much to my surprise, I won the auction.

I have not had the car delivered yet. It should be in my possession early May.

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8 hours ago, 49roadster said:

The center of the rear bumper folds down.

 

Correct. The center section is "hinged" and folds down. There are latches on the back of both bumper guards and when they are disengaged the bumper folds down.

The car having that rear bumper intact was a big selling point to me. If that bumper or section is missing it is one thing that will probably NEVER be found.

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12 hours ago, Silverdome said:

Welcome. Really nice find. More details and pictures please.

The details:

As I stated before it was part of an online only Estate Auction.

I had never before participated in anything like this. It was an online auction with no phone bidding or in-person bidding.

There were several other cars being sold at the same time.

As I watched the bidding, which I jumped in towards the end of the auction, I noticed that there were a couple of other bidders who were not only bidding on the Plymouth but all of the other cars as well. So I thought that I did not stand a snowballs chance in he__ trying to outbid the "heavy hitters".

But, as luck would have it, I wound up being the high bidder.

All-in-all the experience was a good one and all went smoothly.

I have attached a few more pics.

plymouth6.png

plymouth7.png

plymouth5.png

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A stunning car, she looks like a very nice original car, congratulations.  It will bring out the mechanic and woodworker in you.👍

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I have a '40 Plymouth wagon and struggled with the original color scheme. It was a total basket case so leaving it as it was was not an option. It came from Chrysler beige with blond wood, yellow bracketry and hardware and a tan top, with blackwalls, which was Plymouth's only option that year.  The wife wanted a pretty color, so we opted for Brewster Green (a GM truck color from the '40s) with contrasting wood. In 1941 you could get multiple body colors and two tone wood (blond ash with mahogany panels) Because it spent it's life on a turkey ranch in Tonopah Nevada, delivering birds and eggs - it was  considered the delivery van of it's day and so didn't warrant all the fancy color schemes, etc. After seeing your wagon, I almost wish I had stayed stock.Your wagon's color scheme reminds me of vintage postcards showing street scenes of the 1940' and 50s. - very cool!
I agree that you should leave it as original as possible (6 volt, stock motor, etc) but the two best "hidden upgrades" that you can make are front disk brakes, which can be done without lowering the vehicle, and bias-look radial tires. My dad always said to me (during my wild teenage years) "you may want upgrades, but but you only need two things- good tires and brakes"

IMGP0248-1.JPG

ply4384_edited.jpg

IMG_3169.jpg

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Bob yours is beautiful and I'm glad you restored it. Joe yours looks to be amazingly original. If it were mine I wouldn't change anything other than to keep it reliable and safe with regular maintenance.

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52 minutes ago, Silverdome said:

Bob yours is beautiful and I'm glad you restored it. Joe yours looks to be amazingly original. If it were mine I wouldn't change anything other than to keep it reliable and safe with regular maintenance.

Exactly what I plan to do. Besides, I don't have the extra money to restore another car right now.  Not only that, I am a 100% purist when it comes to old cars. If I see a car that has all of its original interior, body, etc and then there is a modern engine in it I lose interest in it in seconds. That's just me and some of the work that is done to some cars is top notch but I cannot do that. I do not believe in changing/altering anything, especially on an all original car.

As far as the brakes, 6 volt system, etc... the car will do just fine as it was designed and manufactured as new. It's not as if the car will be used on a daily basis which I wish it could be. My very 1st car, when I was 17 years old (ancient history), was a 1949 Plymouth 2-door that I DID drive every day. It had the original engine, brakes, etc and served me well as it was.

 

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The "Continental" tire mount fascinates me.  Ingenious, but troublesome. 

 

The continental mount gets the spare tire out of the cargo compartment, or out of the passenger compartment, but creates a very high tailgate, which looks too prominent, makes for a heavy lift to raise and lower the tailgate, and requires the extra step of swinging down the ingenious center section of the bumper before lowering the tailgate. 

 

As cars got longer, with lots of space in the fenders behind the wheels, the spare tire for a station wagon found its traditional home in the fendr,on under the floor.   

Now, station wagons are gone.  The minivan or SUV may have a mini spare under the floor, or a puncture- sealing tire inflation can in a fender.  

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8 hours ago, DonaldSmith said:

The "Continental" tire mount fascinates me.  Ingenious, but troublesome. 

 

The continental mount gets the spare tire out of the cargo compartment, or out of the passenger compartment, but creates a very high tailgate, which looks too prominent, makes for a heavy lift to raise and lower the tailgate, and requires the extra step of swinging down the ingenious center section of the bumper before lowering the tailgate. 

 

As cars got longer, with lots of space in the fenders behind the wheels, the spare tire for a station wagon found its traditional home in the fendr,on under the floor.   

Now, station wagons are gone.  The minivan or SUV may have a mini spare under the floor, or a puncture- sealing tire inflation can in a fender.  

Hey Donald,

Not to change the subject of my Post but I see you have a 47 DeSoto Suburban. I had one so many years ago and I have regretted selling it ever since. If one had come up before I purchased this Woodie I probably would have jumped at the Suburban. I also had a 1949 DeSoto Suburban (1 of 129 made) and a 1951 DeSoto Carryall. As anyone can see I like the oddball stuff. My other Woodie is a 47 T & C Sedan.

The Plymouth Woodie offered me 2 of the things I like most about old cars - (1)- I like Woodie Wagons (2) - I like something that every Tom, Dick and Harry  doesn't have.

Anyway, when the car arrives I will get more pics and update my Post ASAP.

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