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NickPickToo

My First Car -- P15 1947 Plymouth Deluxe

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I'm wondering if it might be better to use a silicone lubricant to get the rubber parts into place.  I've heard that some types of rubber are degraded by oil or grease (over a long period of exposure).  (I should check for anything about this on the internet, because this 'information' came from growing up on the farm a long time ago.)

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2 hours ago, Eneto-55 said:

I'm wondering if it might be better to use a silicone lubricant to get the rubber parts into place.  I've heard that some types of rubber are degraded by oil or grease (over a long period of exposure).  (I should check for anything about this on the internet, because this 'information' came from growing up on the farm a long time ago.)

My great uncle is a big AMS oil fan and has asked us to use it in this project.  We're keeping him posted on how it goes.  When I say 90 wt I really mean AMSoil gear oil.  We have read that that stuff is less an issue on rubber but we didn't read that directly from AMS oil.

Edited by NickPickToo

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39 minutes ago, Vin's 49 Plymouth said:

I fabricated mine like this thread here: 

 

 

I'm going on the record now...my floor pans, brackets and welds will not look as good as what here.  I wish you would not have shared this 

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21 hours ago, Vin's 49 Plymouth said:

I fabricated mine like this thread here: 

 

 

Okay I went out to this guys website.  First, his an experienced german engineer, and second this is what he does.  So now I'm not as depressed.  My job will be dope. 

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Looks so much better after a bath and rebuild kit.  New plunger, balls, gaskets, etc.  Missing one of the adjustment screws and the adjustment screw on the base is bent, but otherwise ready to mount.  Will it run?  I have to wait and see.

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I'll need to make a decision on that heat riser, but I like how this exhaust manifold turned out.  Also on the shifter.  We put a little beeswax on the lower leather bushing that we rasped out, and we also put a little silicone lubricant on the top metal bushing and now it moves like butter.

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Is the heat riser plate stuck in that position? If so, apply a bit of localized heat just above the shaft, on both sides, and it should loosen up. Then you could either put a working counterweight and spring on it to make it functional, or weld it in the horizontal position to disable it and keep the bulk of the heat away from the carburetor. If you’re going to end up with a dual carb intake then I would certainly weld it horizontal, or put a block off plate between the manifolds. 

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3 hours ago, Merle Coggins said:

Is the heat riser plate stuck in that position? If so, apply a bit of localized heat just above the shaft, on both sides, and it should loosen up. Then you could either put a working counterweight and spring on it to make it functional, or weld it in the horizontal position to disable it and keep the bulk of the heat away from the carburetor. If you’re going to end up with a dual carb intake then I would certainly weld it horizontal, or put a block off plate between the manifolds. 

Thank you Merle  The plate moves freely, but we will disable it in the up position and see if we can fit a plate in.  We get the undressed engine back in a few weeks and during the meantime I get to weld brackets into the body.

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2 hours ago, NickPickToo said:

Thank you Merle  The plate moves freely, but we will disable it in the up position and see if we can fit a plate in.  We get the undressed engine back in a few weeks and during the meantime I get to weld brackets into the body.

 

A block-off plate will fit with the flap in the closed position. However, I ground the welds on the flap, removed the shaft and replaced it with a 5/16" bolt which is a nice fit where the shaft used to be. If you go this route use a narrow nut on the inboard end of the bolt and trim it close so you can still access the manifold stud nut behind the heat riser (the one that is often forgotten!).

 

Instead of securing the 5/16" bolt with a nut, I cut it to length so it would be flush with the heat riser and plug-welded a steel strap to the head of the bolt. The strap is secured to the manifold with a 3/8"-24 bolt in the hole that was previously used for the heat riser spring stop. This gives full access to the hidden manifold nut/stud.

 

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Edited by Sam Buchanan

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11 hours ago, Sam Buchanan said:

 

A block-off plate will fit with the flap in the closed position. However, I ground the welds on the flap, removed the shaft and replaced it with a 5/16" bolt which is a nice fit where the shaft used to be. If you go this route use a narrow nut on the inboard end of the bolt and trim it close so you can still access the manifold stud nut behind the heat riser (the one that is often forgotten!).

 

Instead of securing the 5/16" bolt with a nut, I cut it to length so it would be flush with the heat riser and plug-welded a steel strap to the head of the bolt. The strap is secured to the manifold with a 3/8"-24 bolt in the hole that was previously used for the heat riser spring stop. This gives full access to the hidden manifold nut/stud.

 

Thats an elegant solution.  What gage is your plate, and did you prep the side facing the exhaust with anything to delay corrosion?

 

Regards,

 

Ben   

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34 minutes ago, NickPick'sCrew said:

Thats an elegant solution.  What gage is your plate, and did you prep the side facing the exhaust with anything to delay corrosion?

 

Regards,

 

Ben   

 

I don't recall the gage of the mild steel plate but it is approximately the same thickness as the gasket that usually fits between the manifolds. I tried the plate with a gasket but that messed up the manifold hole spacing at the crankcase. The gasket was removed and a liberal coating of red RTV on the exhaust manifold took its place. So far the joint is gas-tight since the two manifolds get cinched up tightly. There is no need to seal the intake side of the block-off plate. No corrosion treatment was used since I assumed it would be quickly eroded by exhaust gases. With all new hardware the intake manifold can be easily removed if service is needed but I think we should be good for a long time. A stainless steel plate would probably be the ultimate option.

Edited by Sam Buchanan

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38 minutes ago, Merle Coggins said:

By the way... what was the purpose for baking the manifold in the oven?

 

Cure the paint.

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42 minutes ago, Merle Coggins said:

By the way... what was the purpose for baking the manifold in the oven?

 

He thought it would be cool given the instruction on the high temp rattle can and a few you-tube videos he ran across.  I suggested he wait till we get the drive train installed and he could simply cure it on the engine, but sometimes young men (and old men who still want to be young.  I didn't object very strongly) just can't wait.  He's going for the original silver aluminum on the block with a mix of flat black and flat silver accessories.  He'll likely have to re-coat and cure anyway as I wouldn't let him take the home oven up to the final temp (called for three separate bakings at progressively higher temps).

Edited by NickPick'sCrew

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Snow day up here in MI today, so we visited Adams Engines to see progress on the block.  Must say, looking sharp.  Mr. Mark Adams and his son Jeff do great work.  Mr. Adams said he gets the reground cam back this weekend and he will be honing the cylinders in the next day or so.  I may have it back in our garage and in the chassis ready for dressing out before thanksgiving.   

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Edited by NickPickToo

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Fuel Pump cleaned up nicely.  All the rubber was in great shape and so was the cork gasket above the bowl.  Upper chamber had a little rust on the spring seat but it cleaned right off.  we sprayed a little silicone lube in the upper chamber.  The screen in the lower chamber is trashed so I'll have to find one.  Hope I don't have to buy a whole rebuild set just for the screen.  This pump still had a tag on it with the numbers 588 and 06269

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You say the rubber is in good condition, but do you know that's it's compatible with modern ethanol blended fuels? Fuel pump kits are fairly inexpensive and good insurance. Check with the good folks at Then and Now Automotive. They may even have that screen for you. I don't believe it's part of a kit.

http://www.then-now-auto.com/fuel-pumps/

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3 minutes ago, Merle Coggins said:

You say the rubber is in good condition, but do you know that's it's compatible with modern ethanol blended fuels? Fuel pump kits are fairly inexpensive and good insurance. Check with the good folks at Then and Now Automotive. They may even have that screen for you. I don't believe it's part of a kit.

http://www.then-now-auto.com/fuel-pumps/

Thanks for the link and the tip.

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