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On the shoes call "ott's friction supply" in Eugene

(In portland they became "fleet pride" but they relined my shoes.....) On the gauges "private message" B1B Keven (little envelope top right of the main page)

Edited by Brent B3B

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Go to the Graham Paige Club website.  In the repair/maintenance section there are photos of a homemade brake gauge you can use to set the brakes up and get them adjusted.

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I plan to keep the truck stock regarding brakes, 6v wiring, charging system, ignition ect. I mean why not? The truck is complete. Might as well work with what is there. It did the job then.

 

 

Great attitude! They are only original once and your truck has great patina. Also, as mentioned, think of it one job at a time so it does not overwhelm you. As the saying goes, "You can eat an elephant................one bite at a time."

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I bet the solution you used in freeing the engine just needs to burn off. I unstuck a 36 Chevy engine this summer and it took about 3 hours of running to get it to clear up..

 

Also, Copper lines are the way to go. They dont even sell steel lines at the parts stores here anymore (carquest and auto value). so much easier to work with.

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Did the exhaust ever clear up? I'm in an identical situation with a 1951 Plmouth Barnfind that had been sitting for 30+ years.  Engine sounds good, no visible leaks, but that darn exhaust smoke is brutal! It's up on jack stands in my garage, as I'm facing the same brake rebuild situation, and I can't sit in the car and apply load for more than a minute or so at a time. 

Just looking for a bit of hope and some good news!

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On 1/17/2016 at 6:13 PM, pipebomb said:

 Also, Copper lines are the way to go. They dont even sell steel lines at the parts stores here anymore (carquest and auto value). so much easier to work with.

A small point of clarification:  copper-nickel brake lines are approved by the DOT.  The older regular copper brake lines are not DOT approved.

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Merle has it right.  The  exhaust system is full of unburned oil.  It can take up to 10 miles of driving to burn this off.   The solution would be to remove the muffler and wash it out.

The oil  coating the header pipe will burn off more quickly due to higher heat.

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Hi all, I'm back and I still have the truck!  Sorry for the long absence.  The new site format looks great!!  It took a minute to find my thread.  I have other hobbies and very one-track mind.  It seems I can only immerse myself in one hobby at a time.  I'm also a musician, and have been very into bass playing for the last 5 years.  Since last posting I've been in 4 bands, changed jobs, sold and bought a house,  and had a baby...but I've started on the truck project again. 

 

The truck has been living quietly and untouched in my garage since I've last posted.  I've recently pulled the gas tank off and I'm taking it in to have it acid dipped next week I hope.  I tred testing the sending unit with my multi-meter set to ohms.  Its a one-wire sending unit and I'm not sure where to put the other lead from the multi-meter.  I put one lead on the connection, and one to ground and did see some movement on the readout as I moved the arm up and down.  Maybe it will still work but we'll see.  Also, I tried to take out the fuel pickup tube, but I'm not sure its supposed to come out. There is a copper fitting that looks to be directly connected to the tube inside, that is screwed into at 3/4 size nut.  I got the nut to spin, but it doesn't seem to want to screw out of the tank.  Almost like it's press-fit.  I should have left that part alone. Now the 3/4 nut turns, but not the like its going to come out.....more like its now going to leak in the future.

 

I also pulled the brake hubs off.  The front shoes actually look great, but I should probably still buy new, as I'm not sure how well the linings are still adhered.  They're 1960's replacements I assume, as they are not riveted on.  I'm having a dilemma on where to buy my new parts.  I've checked with Kanter,  DCM Classics, Oldmoparts, Roberts Motor Parts, Ebay, and my new find, Vic's Dodge Garage, which crazy enough is in Corvalis Oregon, only about 30 miles north of me.  That will hopefully be a godsend.  He offers full brake line reproduction kits.  But as far as shoes, cylinders, hoses etc, it seems everyone has almost everything, but no one has everything I need for a one-stop-shop, except for that kit on ebay from mopar-direct, which is far too expensive.  I need lines, shoes, cylinders, master cylinder, rubber hoses, maybe junctions, and two new seals for the rear axle.  One for sure, but might as well do both. 

 

Money is tight so progress may be slow, but I'm older, wiser, sober, and feeling much more confident about working on this truck.  I will post updates, along with a few photos of the process.  I was thinking of starting a new build thread, or changing the title of this thread, but I'm not sure I have the option.

Edited by '36 Glasstruck

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Tomorrow's payday, so I'm going to pick up a couple things so I can stay motivated and keep progressing on the truck.  I"m not sure whether to start at the master cylinder and work my way to the wheels or vise versa?  I know for a fact that one rear axle needs a new seal as it was oily in and behind one brake hub.  The other side looks good, but might as well do both.  So maybe I'll start there, move on to the shoes and wheel cylinders, and work my way up the lines to the master cylinder.  Does anybody have a good place to order the rear axle seals?

 

I'm also going to see about taking the fuel tank in to have it cleaned.  I was wondering about a home diy procedure for cleaning out the inside of the tank, but Its really bad inside, so maybe getting it dipped is the best solution.  The old gasoline has formed kind of a kerosene smell and a black gritty texture inside.  Not something that is easy to just rinse out I think.

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Welcome back, congrats on the new adventures in life! 

For brake parts, if "Vic's" doesn't have everything,  I am a big fan of https://hagensautoparts.com/dodge+-+truck/9-brake/177

 

as far as seals, I use http://www.sealsourceinc.com/website/light_page.asp?code=homepage 

I doubt they will have a listing for your truck, but if your ever in the Portland area I bet they could match it at the counter.

 

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Thanks for the welcome. I didn't mean to leave everyone hanging who contributed to the thread

 

I'm afraid I won't be in Portland before I need the seals.  Is there a good online source?  I see a listing on ebay for a seal kit, that includes a pinion seal (which my truck has needed for a very long time as seen by the oil fling on the underside of the bed).  The listing says its for a '36 cars but sure looks like it would work on my truck.  It includes inner and outer axle seals, pinion seal and differential cover gasket.

Edited by '36 Glasstruck

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Not sure on-line but, another option (if you haven't already) might be to give "six states" a call.... http://www.sixstates.com/products/locations.jsp

they might be able to point you in a local direction. 

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I took the fuel tank in to have it acid dipped.  Turned out great.  Man that is the way to go.  I then brazed (rookie brazer) the filler neck onto the tank because it was starting to come apart from where it was sealed with lead.  I then repainted it with zinc galvanized style paint.  I will post some pics.  I have also been in contact with Vic from Vic's Dodge Garage in Corvalis.  Wow, what a friendly and helpful guy.  He is going to source every single thing I need for my brakes including new lines.  If anyone is on the west coast and needs parts, I highly suggest contacting Vic.  He is passionate about the hobby, so much so that he is going to personally come down and pick up my old lines, to make sure exact duplicates come out correctly.  I'm also going to have him give my truck a once-over beause he seems like a guru. 

 

I was cleaning out the 80 years of gunk from my backing plates and spindles, preparing for the brake job, and noticed my passenger side king pin is way too loose to not replace so I guess I will do a set of those. So I went on ebay and was lucky enough to find an exact size .797 ream/bushing installer and purchased it tonight.  I'm feeling pretty confident on the kingpin, job, however I wasn't originally planning on doing it.  One thing though, there isn't instuctions in my 34-36 master maintenance manual or my 1940 Chilton on king pin removal and installation, which I think is odd?  Was king pin removal and installation just assumed to be common knowledge back in the old days?  I think I can do it, but I really like having some reference instructions to fall back on.  Not too many pertinent video on Youtube either.

 

Also, I was thinking of buying a set of NORS king pins from ebay, as opposed to a brand new mystery manufacturer set.  What is the general consensus on that topic?

Edited by '36 Glasstruck
grammer

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Coming in on this thread a little late.  A few years back had my B1B at a shop for some bodywork but ended up replacing the whole cab as it was less expensive than repairing  the four lower cab corners.  In the process, the rolling chasis was set outside for a number of months without being covered.  When the shop folks finally got the cab and bed installed they discovered the "rolling chasis" would not roll anymore.  They suspected the engine was seized and started adding diesel fuel, etc. down the spark plug holes. Returned the non-rolling truck to me at my insistance.  I separated the engine and transmission and found the engine was free but the transmission was seized.  While the transmission was out I got the engine running and, like you reported, would start smoking white smoke after a few minutes of running at idle.  The truck was sitting on a slight down hill grade in my yard so I drilled a 1/8 inch dia. hole at the front lower surface of the muffler and sure enough got about a quart of fluid (diesel fuel and whatever else they had put down the spark plug holes).  Don't know how long it would take to burn off this much oil but she runs great now with no smoke.  Filled the 1/8 in. hole with a sheet metal screw.  Then, like you, went on to the brake system.  I would recommend if there is any way you could salvage your current wheel cylinders do so.  The cylinders being sold now must be coming from off shore (China, et al) and have quality problems resulting in leaks and fitment. Others on this forum have reported the same.  The rear wheel cylinders for my truck I bought from Bernbaum are actually front wheel cylinders from cars and the inlet port is sized to fit a brake hose not a hard line as on the rear of a truck.  There is an adapter fitting required to get these cylinders to take a hard line.  When I was doing mine, Bernbaum didn't have the adaptors...he may now.  I don't remember the part number but the manufacturer was Edelmann.  Love your truck.  Good luck and have fun with it. Regards

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Yo, I bought wheel cylinders from 3 different sources at 3 different price points; ~$20 - $60. They were all the same MFG! In hindsight I would send the originals out for sleeving. Two of the cylinders were poorly machined and leaked🤯

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I have sent master cylinders and wheel cylinders for the '48 half ton and '49 1-ton to White Post for sleeving, back in '99 and '04 respectively, and the only issue has been the 1-ton front wheel cylinders have a very small leak, probably due to pitting of the bleeder screw tip, which they told me last year they can fix...not under warranty, of course...$$$ well spent :cool:

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I'm not sure the wheel cylinders are going to be savable.  If they look anything like that master cylinder did, whew, not good at all.   I'll take them off and give them a closer look.   And come to think of it now, I believe the rear ones do have an adapter in them already.  I noticed something screwy when I was looking at how they were attached to the rear lines.  Hmm.

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