Jump to content
Don Jordan

We hold these truths to be self evident...

Recommended Posts

If you have over 10,000 posts then this is not for you. This is just for the regular Plymouth guys - not the gods. It is sometimes annoying to either ask a question or make a comment only to be put down with a snide rebuke. It takes some of the fun out of this experience.

So here's the story: Some of you may be able to relate to this, "It ran when I shut it off!" I removed the engine and took it to a machine shop and had it completely rebuilt. Then I put it back it. I learned a valuable lesson about taking enough pictures. You know that "little bracket" that is so obvious you'd never forget where it goes - some of us forget.

The engine is back in. I could not get it to start. (I'm sure all the pros here would have it humming - not me) So I did all the basic stuff: points, plugs, rotor, cap, cond, wires. Would not start. No spark. I don't mean to drag this on so I'll just tell you: I was one wire off on the dist cap. All back together but I didn't feel the 6v was turning it fast enough. I thought maybe because the engine is new and tight. I'm sure some of the purists will frown on this but I took a 12v batt hooked it to the starter. It turned over like a stock car in Daytona. It was running strong. Oil pressure in the 40s, amps charging, temp 165°. It was warmed up, I hooked the 6v back up - nothing. it just would not spin. It turned like molasses. There was just one more thing to do. (here is where I share my experience with those who may not know) I bought a new grounding strap, new batt cables. I got the biggest the part store had 01.

The batt ground is fastened on the block on the thermostat cover. I took the bolt out and water gushed out. I made a quick switch, got the bolt back on and all was good. With the new cables the engine cranked 3 times as fast. But it would not start. I never knew this - my neighbor just looked at me and rolled his eyes the way my father used to do when I screwed up, there was water on the head in the recess where the plugs go. He said it was shorting it out. I blew it out with an air hose and it fires right up. Strong and beefy sounding (of course I'm running a straight pipe for now.)

Now that is done all I have left is adjusting the clutch. I have an exploded view but I am lacking in spacial relations and I'm having trouble translating it to practical application. The pedal is out, when pushed in it stays until you pull it out. Sounds like a spring. Again I am sorry I didn't take more pictures.

I didn't mean to go on and on - it's just that it was such a simple thing I thought I'd share.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does the adjustable pushrod on the side of the clutch, the one that actually pushed the large fork lever holding the TO bearing, have a return spring? It attaches to the end of fork and the other end to a bracket on the bottom of the clutch hosting. That pushrod is the adjustment for TO bearing free play.   

 
 

Group 6 Clutch.pdf

Edited by P15-D24

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hate to sound like a whiner but it is so cold outside. I think I'm going to go out and take pictures then come into the warm house and try to compare them with the exploded view.

I can't really complain because the east coast is a blizzard. But I live in the dessert where snow is a novelty. My car is mostly outside.

Thank you for the help with the pdf - I will get 'er done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey you 2, isn't it around 50, or is it windy and rain with that. That is workin weather, it is 30 here, I am enjoying this spent 2 hours outside, even drove 55 Fargo, washed the tries and rims off, cleaned garage floor, chickens want to even come out of the coop.

I will tell you, would give anything to have winters 50 above, and no snow, dry and cool, unless doing bodywork, is great. I have done plenty of paint stripping, hammer/dolly, sanding, in temps down below freezing.

I have been known to pull parts in weather below 0, stuff like this is done a lot up here on nice winter days, or nothing would get done.....all the best

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I freely admit - I am a puss. I am 3rd generation California. I have never been in zero°. I can't even imagine it. I never even saw snow until I was in High School. We drove the 200 miles to Tahoe, skied, came home. My hands just can't handle cold. My fingers go numb and I can't feel. My hats off to you guys who not only live in the cold but go outside in it. But I will tell you when it's 110° outside you will never hear me complain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We hold these truths to be self evident...

 

Ever wonder if there was a reason that Mopar elected to design and install this "silly" overcenter spring?  Could it be to make the pedal easier to push down and to come up? Could it be to prevent the throwout bearing from riding the clutch fingers? Did they install it simply to drive production costs up? If it is not necessary then why was it installed on all vehicles? Adjustment is very easy, simply rotate the turnbuckle until the pedal goes up and down with ease and rests in the up position.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We hold these truths to be self evident...

 

Ever wonder if there was a reason that Mopar elected to design and install this "silly" overcenter spring?  Could it be to make the pedal easier to push down and to come up? Could it be to prevent the throwout bearing from riding the clutch fingers? Did they install it simply to drive production costs up? If it is not necessary then why was it installed on all vehicles? Adjustment is very easy, simply rotate the turnbuckle until the pedal goes up and down with ease and rests in the up position.

I don't have any experience with the 40s and 50s version of this. But on the '63 D200 I once had, it was a real bear to press the clutch pedal if the over center spring was removed. And, of course, if the over center spring was installed but mis-adjusted the pedal would stay on the floor. Basically you wanted it installed and properly adjusted to make that truck reasonable to drive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.

Terms of Use