Jump to content
OldDad67

Brake adjusting tool from old drum and hub?

Recommended Posts

As a newbie on this site I'll probably get laughed at but here goes, has anyone removed the brake drum from the hub and then used the hub assy as a substitute for the high dollar brake tool to adjust the brakes. I'm thinking about drilling and tapping the hub to install a threaded rod with an adjustable sliding measuring piece to measure the heel of one brake shoe then rotate the hub to set the heel of the other shoe. This would seem much more accurate than the PVC tool I've seen on some sites. I guess the question is an I crazy or has someone already done this? Thanks in advance.

;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As a newbie on this site I'll probably get laughed at but here goes, has anyone removed the brake drum from the hub and then used the hub assy as a substitute for the high dollar brake tool to adjust the brakes. I'm thinking about drilling and tapping the hub to install a threaded rod with an adjustable sliding measuring piece to measure the heel of one brake shoe then rotate the hub to set the heel of the other shoe. This would seem much more accurate than the PVC tool I've seen on some sites. I guess the question is an I crazy or has someone already done this? Thanks in advance.

;)

If your talking about making things easier take the drum off, take the offset bolt out and grind a slot in it, put the bolt back in and use a screwdriver and a wrench to adjust each side. Its an old trick that I learned from one of the guys that used to work on these when they were still fairly new. Then follow the adjusting instructions from the manual or do a search on this forum.

Being able to adjust the brakes without messing with the drums is so nice. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As a newbie on this site I'll probably get laughed at but here goes, has anyone removed the brake drum from the hub and then used the hub assy as a substitute for the high dollar brake tool to adjust the brakes. I'm thinking about drilling and tapping the hub to install a threaded rod with an adjustable sliding measuring piece to measure the heel of one brake shoe then rotate the hub to set the heel of the other shoe. This would seem much more accurate than the PVC tool I've seen on some sites. I guess the question is an I crazy or has someone already done this? Thanks in advance.

;)

OldDad: I sent you a PM. Please read and then get back to me regarding the Ammco Brake gage. rich Hartung

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thats pretty much what I did, OldDad. Take the drum off the hub and bolt a long finger to the hub using one or two lug bolt holes. Put a 90 degree bend in the arm so it folds over the shoe about an inch. Drill a 1/4" hole in it and use a small bolt with a nut on either side to adjust the end down to the shoe. As you rotate the hub around the shoes you can adjust the toe and heel of each one so they are all equal. Its just something to do on a rainy day. You know, I could be called OldDad 68, if we're talking age.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you able to use one hub for both front and rear brakes or did you make 2 tools?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't. I just used it to get the shoes centered in the drum. I did cut a hole in another drum at the edge of the lining surface so I could stick a feeler gauge in to it. But then I realized that all drums are a different diameter and gave up.

I am toying with the idea of cutting the end off of the shoe halfway through the heel mounting hole. If I grind out the remainer of the hole, I should get the same action as the later floating shoe, eliminating the need for a major adjustment.

I have these ideas all the time. Somebody please stop me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the Ammco brake and I rent the tool out when needed. So why go to all the trouble of rigging a gizmo or ruin a drum.

Contact me to get the specifics about the rental

Rich Hartung

desoto1939@aol.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't. I just used it to get the shoes centered in the drum. I did cut a ...............If I grind out the remainer of the hole, I should get the same action as the later floating shoe, eliminating the need for a major adjustment. ......me.
No doubt, Niel, I just did a brake job today on the 58 Coronet I posted on last week, and it has those floaters and they are soooo nice to work on, (and I always thought Plymouth -15 brakes were fairly easy), and a breeze to adjust. Be nice if everything from the backing plate out would just bolt right on to a P-15/earlier models, huh? Joel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Neil, I just like to make tools for the fun of it. Just because I can I guess. Thanks to you Rich for the offer of the rental tool I'll keep that in mind thats very generous of you to do that for the members. And Neil we are talking about age, when your retired you like to make things that nobody cares about but you. So I'm going to try Neil's tool idea which is sorta what I had in mind. Neil do you have a photo of this tool of yours?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How can you adjust the brake shoe toe and heel clearance's accurately if the radius (curvature) of the shoes doesn't perfectly match/fit each drum?

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To use the 1750/MT19 brake tools ect with ease and accuracy , and ultimately obtain that maximum pedal travel of 2" down rock hard brake pedal on the MoPar Lockheed double anchor brake system- you need to do what?.....

You need to match the shoes to each drum by arching each set of shoes to each drum diameter. That is the fast and easy correct way to get that High/firm pedal that lots of people have big problems obtaining even though all brake system parts have been replaced with new, and they still have a soft/low feeling pedal a lot of times.

Get em arched if you can find a shop-I know that could be difficult.

I have my own machine but I have a couple shops locally that do it too. IMO it's a must for non floating shoe brake systems. Simple to get a firm high pedal.

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When you move the anchor you move the shoe down and out.This centers the shoe back to the middle of the drum.I have done this on several units and I have the Aamco tool.I have found this to work just fine.If a slot is cut into the drum as some are from factory ,this also works but be careful as some are cast in such a way that the slot might weaken the face to drum attachment.The outer part is cast on to the mounting face plate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't. I just used it to get the shoes centered in the drum. I did cut a hole in another drum at the edge of the lining surface so I could stick a feeler gauge in to it. But then I realized that all drums are a different diameter and gave up.

I am toying with the idea of cutting the end off of the shoe halfway through the heel mounting hole. If I grind out the remainer of the hole, I should get the same action as the later floating shoe, eliminating the need for a major adjustment.

I have these ideas all the time. Somebody please stop me.

The major adjustment would still be needed as it moves the shoes to the center of the drum eliminating any need to radius the shoes.That is why the book says that a major adj is needed everytime drums are cut or shoes are replaced. Jim C

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Neil/OldDad67,

I have been doing my brakes on several 1948 Chryslers for 37 years.

I always watched the arrow settings when diassembling and replacing shoes and re-installed similarly. Then using the bolt in the back getting the free play out. I have never had any trouble with my brakes. I guess I am just plain lucky in my own ignorant world. I am however very interested in seeing a picture of your invention. Primarily because I believe that Ammco Tool has become so absurd price wise. In my humble opinion people selling them now are trying to exploit peoples wallets. In a word (Rip Off). No offence to you rich guys that own one but if you purchased it recently - you probably paid way too much for it. Flea Markets still sell them occasionally. That would be the only way I would buy one.

Tom

Edited by Tom Skinner
Add Word

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Neil/OldDad67,

I have been doing my brakes on several 1948 Chryslers for 37 years.

I always watched the arrow settings when diassembling and replacing shoes and re-installed similarly. Then using the bolt in the back getting the free play out. I have never had any trouble with my brakes. I guess I am just plain lucky in my own ignorant world. I am however very interested in seeing a picture of your invention. Primarily because I believe that Ammco Tool has become so absurd price wise. In my humble opinion people selling them now are trying to exploit peoples wallets. In a word (Rip Off). No offence to you rich guys that own one but if you purchased it recently - you probably paid way too much for it. Flea Markets still sell them occasionally. That would be the only way I would buy one.

Tom

Tom, Yes the Ammco tools are very expensive when you find them on Ebay. They go for over $400 and up to $1000.

As stated before in this post and in prior posts I have the Ammco tool and also the Miller MTC19 brake tool witht he sleeves. I have offered to loan out the tool to who ever needs the tool. But I need a deposit on the tool to insure that I get my tool returned. When the tool is returned I refund the entire deposit less the cost of originally shipping the tool to the person. I do not charge for the use of the tool. Some people get upset that I ask for a deposit but since I do not know the members personally I have to protect my investment. I think this is very fair.

So if the members want the correct tool I have it instead of trying to jerry rig a tool you can do it right the first time and have everything setup properly.

So I can not offer any more than this but the offer is out there for the forum members. The cost of the rental or deposit is $400 but you on the average get 385 returned. Where can you rent a tool to fix your brakes on your antique car for $15. You can not got the the NAPA store or AutoZone Store. We all need to work with each other when there are issues. Again I only offer but if the horese does not want to drink from the horse trough then I can not force anyone.

Rich Hartung

Desoto1939@aol.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a picture for your amusement. No, its not micrometer accurate, but it didn't cost me anything and it got my shoes close enough for me. I am also of the opinion that if you dont remove your backing plates, you don't need to make a major adjustment of the anchor pins. But hey, to each his own.

There is also a picture of a hub puller made from another old hub.

post-60-13585363100112_thumb.jpg

post-60-13585363100809_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the photo's it's the only thing my old brain does anymore. Those tools are what I thought they might be. Sure beats overpaying for a tool purchase. Renting is great but I know as soon as I did I'd be removing something again and would have to rent again. If nothing else I guess disc brakes are inorder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.

Terms of Use