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kencombs

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  1. Like
    kencombs got a reaction from bkahler in 54 door replacement saga! Any advice for me?   
    Maybe it's just me, but removing the hinge pins would be my last choice.  Just unbolt the hinges.  Yeah, I know, then you have to adjust the door, but the odds are that will need to be done anyway.
     
  2. Like
    kencombs got a reaction from Radarsonwheels in 54 door replacement saga! Any advice for me?   
    Maybe it's just me, but removing the hinge pins would be my last choice.  Just unbolt the hinges.  Yeah, I know, then you have to adjust the door, but the odds are that will need to be done anyway.
     
  3. Like
    kencombs got a reaction from MarcDeSoto in NOS Oil Pump Pre-Installation Prep   
    My standard procedure on any oil pump is to remove the cover and pack it full, gears/rotors as well as intake and outlet ports with Vaseline.  Aids a lot in picking up the oil ASAP.
    I started doing this in the early 60s when I worked on my first Buick 215 V8.  They recommended this because the oil pump on them is in the very front of the engine and the pickup in is the very back.  They were very slow to prime if not prepped with a vaseline pack. 
    Seemed like a good idea so I just adopted it for all I work on. Even lawnmower engines with oil pumps get the same treatment.
     
    I like NOS parts too.  When  I assembled my 230 I found a set of .040 rings, in Dodge boxes, how lucky can you get?   040 is not used a lot, and to find a set 66 years after the engine was built was amazing.
     
     
  4. Like
    kencombs got a reaction from MarcDeSoto in Problem putting fan and pulley on new water pump. 48 DeSoto   
    Actually IME the opposite is true.  Crudely made offshore stuff is heavier because the molds are inexact and mystery metal is cheaper than making molds that fit.
  5. Like
    kencombs got a reaction from DJ194950 in Rebuilding the 230 - NOS vs New Pistons?   
    As I recall the cam grind was used to counter the uneven expansion of the piston as it heated.  The heavier side, pin bosses, expand differently than the thinner side.  The cam grind was intended to assure it was round at operating temp.
     
    Later designs use a steel strut cast into the piston to accomplish the same result.
  6. Like
    kencombs got a reaction from Dodgeb4ya in Problem putting fan and pulley on new water pump. 48 DeSoto   
    Actually IME the opposite is true.  Crudely made offshore stuff is heavier because the molds are inexact and mystery metal is cheaper than making molds that fit.
  7. Like
    kencombs got a reaction from Bob Riding in Rebuilding the 230 - NOS vs New Pistons?   
    As I recall the cam grind was used to counter the uneven expansion of the piston as it heated.  The heavier side, pin bosses, expand differently than the thinner side.  The cam grind was intended to assure it was round at operating temp.
     
    Later designs use a steel strut cast into the piston to accomplish the same result.
  8. Like
    kencombs got a reaction from Dodgeb4ya in Rebuilding the 230 - NOS vs New Pistons?   
    I suspect the cast iron spec is in error.  Never have I encountered cast iron in a Mopar, only 216 chevies.    NOS stuff in .040 is hard to find as that was not used often, most stopped at 30 and if more was needed they went up to 60.   I was lucky, I had a 56 plymouth engine that was bored 40, had good bores and pistons.  And, I found a set of NOS .040 rings in original Dodge branded boxes.
     
     
  9. Thanks
    kencombs got a reaction from pflaming in Engine scent free cabs   
    I don't know why trucks would be worse than cars, but possibly less attention payed to air sealing.  Clutch/brake pedals?   or airflow around the vehicle with windows down.
     
    In any case the major cause of odor is fumes from the road draft tube.   PCV is the answer.  
     
    And, be sure the exhaust system is tight and gets those fumes where they can't be sucked into the cab.
  10. Like
    kencombs got a reaction from SteveR in ‘47 Dodge Custom Drum Brake Noise   
    +1 on pulling the drums.  I've never encountered a noise due to shoe/backing plate issues.  Mostly have found broken springs, but they make noise when not applying the brakes too, or worn linings most commonly.   riveted linings worn to the rivets do that.
  11. Like
    kencombs got a reaction from Dan Hiebert in ‘47 Dodge Custom Drum Brake Noise   
    +1 on pulling the drums.  I've never encountered a noise due to shoe/backing plate issues.  Mostly have found broken springs, but they make noise when not applying the brakes too, or worn linings most commonly.   riveted linings worn to the rivets do that.
  12. Like
    kencombs got a reaction from P15-D24 in Timing for 218 flathead 6   
    Agreed.   But I start with a vacuum gauge setting first.  That usually gets very near optimum.   I don't think I've used a timing light on old engines in 20 years or more.
  13. Like
    kencombs got a reaction from OUTFXD in Windshield Wiper Arm Adjustment.   
    from the appearance, it seems the big on just locks the arm to the serrated shaft.  The other appears to adjust tension toward the windshield.
  14. Like
    kencombs got a reaction from oldodge41 in Oil changes - official records?   
    According to the  Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, the auto maker cannot require maintenance to be done by them as a condition of warranty coverage.  They can however require records and receipts.    If a dealer trys that, just contact either a regional rep or corporate and they will get straightened out in a hurry!
  15. Like
    kencombs got a reaction from Sniper in Oil changes - official records?   
    According to the  Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, the auto maker cannot require maintenance to be done by them as a condition of warranty coverage.  They can however require records and receipts.    If a dealer trys that, just contact either a regional rep or corporate and they will get straightened out in a hurry!
  16. Thanks
    kencombs got a reaction from OUTFXD in Fuel Flow issue.   
    I would first suspect late ignition timing, so mixture is still burning when the exhaust valve opens.  Or, rich mixture, so rich that some gets burned in the exhaust system.  But that would (should) also be accompanied with a really black tailpipe and probably a really eye burning exhaust fume and stink. 
     
    either should cause noticeable driveability and/or power problems.
  17. Thanks
    kencombs got a reaction from OUTFXD in Fuel Flow issue.   
    My cheap fix for pump pins:  If needed, grind the pin short enough that it is recessed on both ends.  Doesn't need much. less than 1/16".  Insert pin, using a center punch make a series of small indentations around the hole.   You can angle the punch toward the pin after the first tap or too.  That assures the metal displaced by the punch flows toward the hole.   Flip over, do other side.  Use a small pin punch to make sure the pin won't move past the punches.  Done.
     
    Been doing this since way back when rebuilding old pumps was just the normal thing to do.
  18. Thanks
    kencombs got a reaction from dgrinnan in Broken valve   
    That’s not what I said.  Just pointing out that that is a weak point.   Seldom happens but they can fail due to a weak joint not up to standard and repeated closing shocks.   Luckily 230 springs aren’t very strong.  
  19. Like
    kencombs got a reaction from rtferguson39 in Coolant Pooling in Intake Manifold - 230 Flathead 6   
    I just looked at a spare intake and can see no way for coolant to migrate into it.  Studs may leak, but there is no connection from those holes to the inside of the manifold. 
     
    I second Sam's question  as to the possibility of fuel pooling.
  20. Haha
    kencombs got a reaction from Sniper in Low Compression #3   
    Eternal optimist you are!  
     
    That was my best Yoda voice, could you tell?
  21. Like
    kencombs got a reaction from Sniper in Carb cleaning?   
    Just my observations on carb maintenance.   No dedicated carb cleaner that I've encountered will attack corrosion.   They are formulated to remove varnish, fuel deposits etc which are organic in nature.  Corrosion is not. It is  metallic or mineral and is best removed by either a base or acid.  The problem is that those will also attack metals.  So the strength of the solution is important too weak and it won't work, to strong and the metal gets etched, or worse.  The same applies to duration of immersion.  And, to make it even more difficult, not all carbs are the same metal composition.  Zinc, aluminum and others are alloyed in varying proportions and may react differently.
     
    Working on old garden tractors, I've seen the result of to much of a good thing, carb bodies just eaten away.
     
    I usually start with normal grocery store white vinegar, for a couple of hours, then progress to stronger and/or longer if needed.   This is after cleaning with something else to get the varnish, etc off.  
     
    Seldom, but sometimes, soda blasting also, but that is usually just for outer appearance.  Cast iron can be cleaned in the normal blast cabinet with Black Beauty media.
     
    BTW, that is how I remove rust from smaller body parts too.  Soak in vinegar then pressure wash and rinse with a soda solution.
     
     
  22. Like
    kencombs got a reaction from Solga in Daydreaming .... sort of   
    Just a little clarification on the angles.   Trans and pinion are the same, but one down, one up. 
  23. Like
    kencombs got a reaction from lostviking in Noisy tappet that keeps loosening   
    These are "mushroom" lifters, bigger on the bottom and must be removed from the bottom.
  24. Like
    kencombs got a reaction from lostviking in Daydreaming .... sort of   
    Just a little clarification on the angles.   Trans and pinion are the same, but one down, one up. 
  25. Thanks
    kencombs got a reaction from Marcel Backs in NOS Oil Pump Pre-Installation Prep   
    My standard procedure on any oil pump is to remove the cover and pack it full, gears/rotors as well as intake and outlet ports with Vaseline.  Aids a lot in picking up the oil ASAP.
    I started doing this in the early 60s when I worked on my first Buick 215 V8.  They recommended this because the oil pump on them is in the very front of the engine and the pickup in is the very back.  They were very slow to prime if not prepped with a vaseline pack. 
    Seemed like a good idea so I just adopted it for all I work on. Even lawnmower engines with oil pumps get the same treatment.
     
    I like NOS parts too.  When  I assembled my 230 I found a set of .040 rings, in Dodge boxes, how lucky can you get?   040 is not used a lot, and to find a set 66 years after the engine was built was amazing.
     
     
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