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Adam H P15 D30

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Adam H P15 D30 last won the day on October 20 2020

Adam H P15 D30 had the most liked content!

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About Adam H P15 D30

  • Rank
    Senior Member, have way too much spare time on my hands

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  • Gender
    Not Telling
  • Location
    SF Bay Area
  • My Project Cars
    Too Many

Converted

  • Location
    San Francisco Bay Area, Kalifornia
  • Interests
    Cars, Motorcycles, Boats etc.

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  • Occupation
    Ford

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2,262 profile views
  1. If you run the valves, you need a 2lb for the front and 10lb for the rear. I run neither and never had a problem What master cylinder are you running?
  2. I have to ask why bother? If it's for the 'coolness' part or a neat 'gizmo' from the day, I totally get it! No need to answer the why. If you're actually looking for a benefit, I'd look elsewhere. These engines will run on anything combustible and last many more miles than most will drive them.
  3. Some time ago a member posted about adapting a Mustang? steering box but I cannot find it anymore. Is you steering box full of oil? pump the front tires up higher. I set mine to 40 PSI but they are much smaller than yours Thinner tires, 235 is a wide tire for the front King pins, bushings and thrust bearings all good and lubed? Tie rod ends lubed?
  4. Actually it's 8 rows of 8, over 500 measurements but the block was bored .090 and I diligently searched for a thin spot. There were many that thought that block would be junk. For what ever it's worth, it was a replacement 58 truck block and never had numbers stamped into the pad like yours has. I think I used a silicon grease for the paste and I was able to mechanically measure several parts of the cylinders through the water jacket to verify the readings I were receiving were accurate. I figured I didn't want to go thinner than .125, especially on a thrust side. I
  5. Check your rubber fuel lines and make sure they aren't collapsing. Fuel tank pick up partially plugged?
  6. Not sure why your post is struck through but I may be able to help a little. I have never messed with a Dodge HEMI but have dabbled with its big brother. These blocks are thick, I doubt .060 over will be a problem. Amazon has sonic testers at a good price, make sure you get the convex probe for the round cylinder walls. I have a truck 354 block that was bored to 4.030 (that's a lot) and I thought the block was junk. Most of the guys on the HAMB thought the same also so I bought a sonic tester and measured hundreds of locations in the bores looking for that elusive thin spot
  7. I've had good luck using brake pliers to attach the spring to the hinge.
  8. One at the base of the column, one at the rack. No center support needed. Grind a groove in the shaft where the u-joint set screws contact it. Use red locktite and make sure no oil leaks can touch it.
  9. In reality these cars aren't heavy enough and the tires are small enough you don't need to worry about hub centric wheels. Just make sure it fits over the hub...
  10. Out of OD but handle pushed in, mine freewheeled. Not sure you would want to be in OD going up and down mountain passes
  11. Just another tidbit of info, When I had my flathead Ferd with an R11 OD, I would stop and pull the OD lockout (OD off) when going over mountain passes. I cooked the brakes once coming down a pass in the Sierras before I learned that valuable lesson. They freewheel as you probably know...
  12. I also had some steep geared muscle cars in my past that were daily drivers. Trick is to disconnect the tach and turn up the radio for the road trips
  13. I've posted this before but my kid has a D150 with a stock slant 6, 833 OD and 3.55 rear gear. After driving that, I would go with a T-5
  14. If power isn't your first priority, you could look for a 331-354 HEMI and 99% of the bench racers wouldn't know the difference unless you go with an early, early 331. Easier to find...
  15. Oh how well I know that drill...
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