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greg g

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greg g last won the day on November 19

greg g had the most liked content!

About greg g

  • Rank
    Zen Master, I breathe vintage mopar!

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Not Telling
  • Location
    manlius, ny
  • My Project Cars
    46 ply business CPE

Converted

  • Location
    Just outside Syracuse, NY/ 46 Plym Business Coupe/ Home of the electric traffic signal
  • Interests
    hittin stuff with hammers

Contact Methods

  • Occupation
    re-tyred (currently radials)

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  1. Who ever ran the tires for the rear signals in my coupe ran them along the drivers side door sill under the floor mat then through a small in the trunk bulk head and then up to join the wires coming into the trunk at the package shelf. Plymouth verts operated on vacuum, since the switch is at the passenger side end of the dash board, the vacuum line probably follows a similar path along the passenger door.
  2. Lots of black ones, cruiser maroon was popular, dark blue, yellow, tan, dark green, peasoup green, cadet blue, airwing grey, sumac red, are colors I have seen at shows around the country. A friend has a green called Hollywood. Maybe let's do a picture poll Black
  3. Yep stock wheels had clips to retain the hubcaps.
  4. This announcement came to us this AM via Facebook. Long time member and contributor to these pages Don Coatney has passed away. https://www.northernindianafuneralcare.com/notices/Donald-Coatney?fbclid=IwAR3TuqNU5fKgxGaL_gQXkqyCJt-F09m80kr09pwFG5Yc61BjRq6xA6Vadh0 Our condolences go out to Lisa and Don's family. Don's contributions to this forum and these pages were very informative and assisted in keeping a lot of old Plymouths, Dodges, Chrysler's, and DeSotos on the road. Wishing him smooth roads and great scenery on his final trip.
  5. 75 series 15 inch radials on my 46. Aftermarket steel smoothies painted. Yes they are deep purple.
  6. Pulling power from the generator means you only have lights when the engine is running. 90% of the time that's probably ok, but if you are driving around at night and loose the fan belt you got nothing. Power for the relays should come from the battery, easiest place is the battery side terminal for the starter solenoid if not from the battery itself.
  7. Look under the spark plugs and wires tubes for the spring.
  8. Some of them went from the bell crank to a hook on the brace for the oilbath oil cleaner. Have also seen a couple go to an eylet screwed into one of the headbolts with the threaded head. If you enlarge this pic you can see the spring running from the bell crank to the hook. There should be a v notch on the bell crank where the spring hook sits into.
  9. Both my 46 deluxe and 56 Savoy engines are internal , But I have seen a 36 with internal, a 47 with external, 39's with either or. Don't think there was any rhyme or reason for which got what or when.
  10. Hope everyone is well and has time to spend with family and friends. Best wishes to all. Travel safe.
  11. What engine? I have a friend who has a couple spare flywheels in decent shape. Four bolt 218. Not sure on the tooth counts. He is out of town for a few days.
  12. Ok, guess I need some electrical splainin done. For brake lamps, I am running 55watt halogen bulbs in my rear taillight fixtures as well as the standard 6 volt single elemant center lamp. I am powering the brake light switch from the battery side of the starter solinoid.through a 20 amp inline fuse. System has been working fine for a dozen years or so. With this wiring with the car running, the ammeter shows a positive charge when I apply the brakes.it remains positive till the brakes are relaesed. This is pretty handy as I can tell from the driver's seat if the brake lights are working, but is seems that the load of the lights triggers the VR to call for a charge equal to their load instead of show a discharge or drain. What gives.
  13. I guess the question of doing two relays or one depends on a couple of factors. First being the age condition of the dimmer switch itself as they can be a significant source of resistance in the circuit ase videnced by the number of them that won't pass any current after they have sat for a while. The other is, how often you operate with high beams on. If most of your after dark operation is around town, then maybe the relay for low beams only is an option. If you spend a lot of time at night on country 2 lane roads maybe only the high beams need a relay. Lots of options depending on you use and current condition of the components of your lighting circuits.. I found a significant increase in headlamp performance a few years back by cleaning the area where the ground from the lamp goes to the body. On the p15 the ground screw goes to the part of the headlight bucket the receives all the water, mud, and other stuff thrown up by the front tires. I drilled a new hole and attached a new ground wire to a spot that is out of the direct path of tire spray. My 6v head lamps put out as much light as my 12v setup in my Studebaker. And of course no one will mention the elephant in the room... At my age, I can't see at night like I did ten years ago, regardless of how bright my lights are.
  14. Are you wiring the relay to the low beams or the high beams? If both you need two relays. One for each circuit. You can use the lines from the switch to the junction blocks to power each relay. If you think of the relay as having two sides,it makes it easier to understand. The relay comprises two circuits. The switch side and the power side. The switch side is over in and ground. When powered it turns on a magnetic powered contacts on the power side. When connected it supplies battery power through the load to ground. The position of the relay should shorten the path from the battery to the light lessening resistance to the load. The longer path from the relay back to the dimmer switch is now a lesser current traveling a similar path but with a lower flow so again less resistance. While you are messing with the circuits, clean or renew the lamp to ground wires. And if there isn't a ground between body and engine or frame install one.
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