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rekbender

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rekbender last won the day on January 21 2018

rekbender had the most liked content!

About rekbender

  • Rank
    Junior Member, just joined the forum !

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Milford OH
  • Interests
    Anything old and mechanical that can be taken apart.
  • My Project Cars
    1936 Plymouth Coupe, 1949 Plymouth convertible, 1970 Dodge A108 Sportsman van, 1972 Opel Ascona 1900

Contact Methods

  • Biography
    45 year MOPAR fan
  • Occupation
    Retired

Converted

  • Location
    MLFORD, OHIO
  • Interests
    Antique cars, anything mechanical, dogs

Recent Profile Visitors

2,377 profile views
  1. My kind of car. My favorites are unrestored survivors. Just my preference, but I'd have to leave it just as it is!
  2. This appears to be the same draft tube chamber that you have, chamber only with a mesh filter, no real tube, but a crimped, vented cap on the end of the short tube. I assumed it was factory. The engine was a D42 removed from a pick up.
  3. I have a front sump pan, oil pick up, and front sump dip stick (dip stick tube threads into a boss on the front of the pan) that I removed from a truck engine. I can dig it out of storage and take some pics if you need them.
  4. About six years ago, I answered a CL ad for a '53 or '54 Corvette project, stored for years in a building just a few miles away. When I arrived, I saw a bunch of other cars that had been stored there as well, including a 1934 Desoto Airflow. The car was remarkably complete (the fender skirts were in the back seat), but had been sitting a long, long time, and would need everything. Although the owner's wife had agreed to meet me at noon, a Corvette dealer had shown up at 10:00 AM and she had already sold him the Vette and the Airflow. She let the Airflow go for $7000.00. It was a fascinating au
  5. Great car, looks straight, complete, and unmolested. It appears to be a P2 - bright sergeant stripes on the headlamp stanchions, wood grain trim around the windows and on glove boxes (one fake ha ha), two wipers, should have brown rubber starter pedal pad and other rubber interior parts. These are wonderful drivers as they are small, steering is light, and the hydraulic brakes are adequate for a 2700 lb. car. Mechanical parts are available, although some are '36 only as this was a one year only body/chassis. Trim parts are expensive and somewhat had to find. The only change I made to my unrest
  6. Here is a picture of the cable operated convertible top mechanism and screw jacks I removed from a '51 Plymouth convertible that was being scrapped. It consists of a reversible electric motor, two drive cables and two worm gear screw jacks. No hydraulics. I'm guessing that yours is similar. My 1949-1954 Plymouth Service Manual covers this mechanism briefly. I can copy and post the pages if you need them.
  7. JerseyHarold, Thanks for the info. I'll try it later this afternoon.
  8. I pulled my non-working Model 807 radio last Monday to adjust the cowl vent. Since its was out, why not open it up and have a look? The "OFF" and "DIAL" pushbuttons weren't working - the soft metal arms that work the switches had been bent, so I straightened them, and the pulled the vibrator and tubes to clean the pins. When it was back together, it actually turned on, hummed, and started to play. Someone had the pointer string loop wrapped backwards around the dial stem, and that was corrected. Two new light bulbs and the dial lit up.There was a small screw on the bottom of the chassis that l
  9. Thanks for the pictures/information. I did look on eBay and found a very very expensive valve. Probably the same one you were looking at. I can't even imagine how that valve can be worth the amount being asked. Anyway, I do not need a new one, just one that works. If you have one that fits and works I would be interested. Let me know what you would want for it.

    Thanks again for your help.

    Melvin

    1. rekbender

      rekbender

      Hi, I'll dig through my stuff this afternoon and see what's there. I remember one on a parts engine from a couple years ago. Gerry

    2. rekbender

      rekbender

      My valve appears to be an earlier version. I took it apart and it looks to be in good condition. I don't think this valve was designed for a pressurized cooling system - probably from the '30's or '40's. I found a 1949 MOPAR part number - 1257 425.  $50.00 plus shipping. Let me know if you're interested. It might be worth it to make an offer on the new one on eBay. There are also universal in-line cable operated valves that could be adapted. Gerry

      DSC09719.jpg

      DSC09721.jpg

      DSC09724.jpg

    3. olsonm

      olsonm

      Yes, I am interested. Looks like what I need. I did look at several universal valves but I would rather have one closer to the original. How does the cable wire attach? 

  10. The first picture is the cable operated valve that was on my B4C. The second is the valve on my P18. Seems to be a fairly common valve . I've seen them NOS on eBay, but expensive. I may have an old used one if you can't find a new valve.
  11. This was my 1953 B4C. It had belonged to a horse farm in Kentucky. I sold it in 2009 to purchase a '36 Plymouth coupe. Has anyone seen this truck?
  12. This is just a thought. You mentioned in your original post that the spreader spring was on the second gear synchro. The service manual shows it behind the high gear stop ring and the clutch gear hub, not second. i still have the '51 transmission in pieces, so I put the spreader ring behind the second gear stop ring and assembled the clutch gear to the main shaft. It could be assembled with the spring tabs either toward the clutch hub, or toward the stop ring. Either way, it does interfere the with the stop ring free movement, and would become deformed if the clutch gear snap ring was install
  13. That spring is called a spreader spring. I've seen this in a 1951 Plymouth transmission. I don't remember my '49 synchro as having it, although the stop rings were the same. The only picture I can find is in the 1946-1954 Plymouth service manual, and only in the overall parts breakdown picture. They don't mention the spreader spring at all in the synchro section, or the main shaft assembly section. The OD section does show two adapter (mid-plate) screws.
  14. Nice car. My first car was a '54 Dodge 4 door. A neighbor (original owner) gave it to me with just under 100K in 1965. Great dash, tutone green, 241/powerflite, bullet proof. I still miss that car. I'm jealous.
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