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bamfordsgarage

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bamfordsgarage last won the day on December 26 2017

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About bamfordsgarage

  • Rank
    1947 D25 Sedan

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  • Gender
    Not Telling
  • Location
    Edmonton, AB
  • My Project Cars
    1916 American LaFrance plus little projects on all the others

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  • Biography
    1947 Dodge D25 (Canadian)

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  • Location
    Edmonton, Canada
  • Interests
    VIntage motoring

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  1. Lots of worthwhile comments here, but IMO the last three paragraphs of knuckleharley’s long post a few up are right on. Find a friendly machine shop who will assess what you’ve got and what’s needed. Well worth the modest cost.
  2. Thanks for that clipping, Ralph. What a treat! It was the only press we got on that trip. I remember trying to chase a copy of that edition down but IIRC never managed to get one. Here is that reporter capturing the moment:
  3. Well hi Greg, thanks for asking. Jerry and I are both well, he had a very mild Covid over Christmas but I emerged unscathed. Our long distance tours have mostly been in the ‘24 T speedster, but we had a great run several years ago to the PNW in his ‘50 Plymouth. I’ve got the Dodge up on stands these days for brake work and a steering box.
  4. Is that script by the headlight actually there or a doctored photo?
  5. One could probably make a tool in less time that it takes to overthink the problem. I did it just now in 25 minutes from a 7/16 bolt. The shank diameter is the same as kitty corner on the 5/16 square. File one flat until it’s 5/16 across the flat, mark as your reference and use that surface to eyeball the other three sides for filing. Leave a bit of shank so the square end protrudes from the socket. I’m planning to drain and fill my diff next week and figured I’d get a head start making the tool today. Joke’s on me — turns out the ‘47 D25 doesn’t have a separate drain plug.
  6. First photo is my '47 D25 some years ago the day we had our first big dump of the season. By good fortune I had a pre-arranged appointment for 8:00 that morning to get my studded knobbies installed (getting to the tire shop was a challenge). The summer tires are bagged up and in the carrier. Time to swap them out again.
  7. Hey Frank, another voice from years ago — thanks for your post. It's nice to be remembered before we expire. No adventures in the old Dodge the past few years, but in 2017 Jerry and I cruised to Portland in his then-newly-acquired '50 Plymouth sedan. Great road trip car, too — overdrive, quiet & comfortable, 35K original miles. Most of our older-car adventures have been in my '24 Ford T Speedster. This September we toured down to southern Alberta and into Saskatchewan for eight days. One morning we found ourselves unexpectedly entering the US — turns out the border
  8. Quick answer: Yes My 1953 Hollanders Interchange says all Dodge and Plymouth cars 1942-48 will interchange except limo and 7-passenger sedans. Of course, Hollander also suggests a trade price of $26.23 for the assembly...
  9. Thank you Dan and Sniper. I agree that castor and maybe camber are bigger factors in steering return. In Model Ts the only steering adjustment is toe-in (the others are built in) and that affects it as well. Good to hear Dan that yours has play near the extremes as well. Also agree that free play near the extremes is not a big deal during low-speed - ie parking - operation. This much thought about a steering box is new for me. Dunno about “over thinking”, just trying to fully understand. A big hurdle for me was the notion that this critical component, subject to w
  10. The 5/32” stock should be available locally. Save yourself time and save your lungs some abuse and get the right stuff from the start. On the other hand, depending how much material your machinist took off the drum diameter, the thicker lining could work.
  11. Hi Dan, thanks for your comments. To clarify, I did realize that the lock-to-lock on the bench is greater than in the car with steering components attached. By my figuring it was 4-1/2 turns on the bench and 3 in the car. Having said that, even at 3 turns lock-to-lock on the bench, there is the equivalent of 4" play at the steering wheel rim even though there is no rim play when centred (the steering seems play-free until about 1/2 turn either way from centred). Also, there is none of the in-out play of the steering shaft that you mentioned. Although the bench test is for wheel ef
  12. You are in the greater Denver area — there have to be a number of businesses nearby that will sell you the necessary lining right off the roll while you wait. Look for an outfit that offers truck clutch and brake service. These guys reline brakes, or have them relined, all the time. A couple weeks ago I purchased 63" of one size lining and 54" of another size for a not-Mopar project. $127Cdn tax in with a nice profit for the vendor.
  13. " ...anybody see a snake in this picture...?" I hope you're not referring to friend Jerry 🙂 " ...you should grab the cowl trim off that beast!" Would those be the short pieces ahead of the doors? If I do go back to recover more bits it won't be until spring — winter landed here today:
  14. Hello all, good to browse a bit and see some familiar names. It's been too long since I visited regularly. I'm replacing the steering box in my well-travelled D25 sedan. The original box seems worn past the limits of adjustment. I've found a replacement box from a D25 coupe and to my amazement it seems nearly perfect as is. That rarely happens in my world, and I'd like comments from those more knowledgeable before making assumptions. There is no discernible end play in the steering shaft or cross shaft, nor can I sense any looseness in the bushings. The shaft turns easi
  15. Model T Ford valve door stop. 1920s Dodge rad shell hiding modern exhaust fan. Inset is expanded-metal screen from the abandoned Packard plant in Detroit. Four-blade fan is 1926-27 Model T, rotates gently when the powered fan is on.
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