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  1. desoto1939

    desoto1939

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  2. keithb7

    keithb7

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  3. kencombs

    kencombs

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  4. 1949 Wraith

    1949 Wraith

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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/09/2022 in all areas

  1. Yes I agree that keeping the car original has its appeal. So as many of you have read that I drove my stock 1939 Desoto from valley forge Pa to Altoona Pa to attend the National desoto clubs car show and convention back in June. I drove the car on the Pa Turnpike the posted speed limit goes from 55-70 MPH. I drove the 39 at the average speed of 50-53 and stayed inthe right lane. I had blinker lights like what would be used on a bicycle attached to the my license plate and also reflective plastic strips over the rear bumpers. We drove a total of 550 miles. I would like to say that i did not have any issues with truckers or other car. They all gave me plenty of room and no one was on my butt going each direction. On my way home i even had a tractor Trailor stay behind me all the way from Harrisburg Pa to valley forge for an approx distance of 75 mile and acted as a buffer to my car. When he went around me I waved a big thank you to him and he replied with a pull on his air horn. So yes you can still travel with these older cars but you also have the responsibility to be aware of your surroundings and to give the other guys the room they also require. Rich Hartung desoto1939@aol.com
    3 points
  2. keithb7

    Oil Pan Suprise

    10W30 20W30 15W40 20W40 20W50 Don’t run synthetic Add zinc! Use oil designed for diesel engine! Use Hot rod oil with zinc already added! Add lead to fuel! Run synthetic oil! 0W50 Add Marvel Mystery Oil to crankcase! Add marvel mystery oil to fuel tank! Run SAE30! There yes indeed, there is your single firm, solid answer. If anything if might prevent 25 more posts in this thread. Maybe. Maybe not. Lol. 😄
    3 points
  3. I was at a swap meet last week and ended up buying this 1965 Dodge D100 Utiline. She spent most of her life on a ranch in Coty, Wyoming. 225 slant 6 with 4 speed manual and 3.55 rear end.
    2 points
  4. I see what is going on there, you got to hold that dog back from taking the wheel....and with the blurred car out the window...you gotta be speeding....!!
    2 points
  5. Kilgore47

    Rear Main

    One of the reasons for pulling the pan on the P15 today was to check the rear main seal. When I would raise the front of the car oil would run out of the back of the engine. With the pan off I could see a couple of places where the gasket did not seal in the corners close to the rear seal. If the rear seal was bad wouldn't the fly wheel be covered in oil? It is not. And the clutch is dry. These pictures were taken before I dropped the pan. Guess I'll put it back together with a new pan gasket and see what happens. Now that I know it's easy to drop the pan. If I have to take it off again it won't be so grubby. Everything will be clean. I can fix that - I think
    1 point
  6. Booger

    Rear Main

    I know most of us would like to have spotless garage floors. Some are "leakers" some are not. replaced rear main 6 months ago. theres a little puddle. cardboard does wonders for your garage floor
    1 point
  7. maok

    Dwell 28 degrees

    FYI, it wasn't an issue with the Pertronix,
    1 point
  8. kencombs

    Cheap aftermarket parts

    I disagree with the term cheap. The parts are substandard, but the prices are anything but cheap!
    1 point
  9. whew...thought you bought a chebby or ferd!
    1 point
  10. desoto1939

    cooling additive??

    I just had a very interesting phone conversation with a tech rep from Valvoline in regards to their Zerex Original Green Antifreeze Coolant. This coolent is an IAT type of collent and this is the product that they recommend to be used in out older cast iron block engine. Make sure that the bottle has the wording ORIGINAL Green and the part number on the container is listed as ZX001 ZEREX Original Green. This comes in a 50/50 mixture. This product is good for 5 years or 100k miles but their tech rep states that we should basically drain every 3 years to keep up the anti rusting agent. Also if you had used the type that has the OAT products that you should drain the system and flush becasue they have found that some of the gaskets and seals do get compromizsed. attached is the Tech sheet on the Zerex Original Green product. Hope this solves the question on AF. Rich Hartung desoto1939@aol.com US_Val_ZXOGreen_AFC_EN.pdf
    1 point
  11. Driving and buildings/rebuilding
    1 point
  12. I do enjoy both, but the build is the ultimate challenge, driving is the reward. If I just bring a car back (like my profile 49) it will usually stay somewhat stock. If it's a body off, it gets modified and the sky's the limit (or wallet). I drive my 49 a lot, 5-10k per year but when I was driving in SF Bay Area traffic, it had to be modified a little. Those that live in the Bay Area understand the types of cars/drivers we are up against, so disc brakes and radial tires might give you just enough edge to keep out of trouble. Driving these old cars has become exponentially more fun since I escaped the Bay Area for the sticks but I do drive them back to visit parents/friends. A lot of the time driving the mostly stock 49 is the most fulfilling, there is a certain charm that gets partially lost with hotrodding.
    1 point
  13. Kilgore47

    Oil Pan Suprise

    I finally got brave enough to pull the oil pan on the 47 P15 today. It was actually easy. Except for the really grubby part. Stuff falling in my face. Probably going to toss that T shirt in the garbage. When I adjusted the valves there wasn't any sludge in there. So I didn't expect to find very much if any in the pan. I found a little more than a quarter inch of sludge in the bottom of the pan. The pick up screen was clean. The surprise part is that under the black sludge there was a gray sludge. This gray matter is dense and around the outside and in the corners. It has metal in it. I was able to pick up the metal with a magnet. The other surprise part is that I also found small wire brush parts in the gray sludge. The wire brush parts were probably left over from the rebuild in the mid 70's. The other very fine metal flake looking stuff may be from the break in 45 years ago. Metal in the pan is never a good thing. But the gray sludge appears to have been held in place all these years by the black sludge. I checked the rods and there is a little front to back movement but no up and down movement that I could feel. The PO told me they put a rebuilt engine in the car in 1974 when they pulled it out of a field. They also told me that it didn't have many miles on it. I guess it is what it is. I'm going to clean everything I can get to and put it back together with a magnet glued to the drain plug. Drain the oil in a couple of hundred miles and see in any more metal has collected on the magnet. I'm also going with a detergent oil when I put it back together. Not telling what viscosity I'll be using. That would get too many comments😁 More news latter
    1 point
  14. Loren

    Oil Pan Suprise

    Ethyl Lead ( the heavy grey muck ) will be seen much less in the future. My Dad used to ask me to collect some of it from time to time when I found it in the bottom of an old oil pan. He mixed it with grease to make Center Lube. He said you used to go to the paint store to buy it in tiny 1/4 pint cans but the feds stopped that. The company that made “Dutch Boy” paints was once known as The National Lead and Varnish Company and they offered it for that exact purpose. My Dad was a machinist who specialized in cylindrical grinding between dead centers. When you had centers that squeaked a little dab of white lead would stop it. When you think about the thousands of gallons of leaded gasoline that have to be burned in an engine to generate that much lead in the crankcase, it boggles the mind! The best lead came from engines made after 1965. The positive crankcase ventilation system sucked the water blow by out of the engine leaving a hard layer of grey lead and no sludge. There are wall charts in some automotive machine shops which show the various conditions you will find bearings in and what caused it. Dirt and metal particles that have done damage are mostly found imbedded in the soft metal of the bearings. The stuff you find in the oil pan can be harmless. I’ve learned not to get too excited by oil pan debris. It’s what the bearings have absorbed that really matters.
    1 point
  15. MBF

    Fuel gauge difficulties

    You need a Runtz type resistor that doesn’t require a lot of amps to function. If you’ve converted to 12v + ground you’re probably going to need to reverse the wires on the gauge to make it work properly
    1 point
  16. keithb7

    Oil Pan Suprise

    Somebody get this man a beer! Very accurate assessment.
    1 point
  17. kencombs

    Oil Pan Suprise

    I don't worry about adding zinc as there was none in the oils available when these cars were new for the most part. It only became common after high performance OHV engines came on the scene. The increase invalve train weight, higher rpm and spring pressure drove the need to reduce wear at the cam/lifter interface. The gray is primarily aluminum from piston wear, fine cast iron particles from the cylinders, and lead alloys from bearing wear. Larger Iron/steel particles come primarily from timing components, chain and gears.. I've never seen any research confirming lead from combustion contributing to sludge. It's interesting to me to see the difference that was apparent back in the 60s whe full flow filters became common. Back then I was deeply into at least a couple of engines a week. Engines just didn't have the heavy gray deposits if equipped with full flow filters like the yblock fords, poly head mopars and small block chevys. Blowby create black sludge from oil carbons , but not the gray stuff.
    1 point
  18. Sniper

    Rear Main

    I agree, probably wouldn't hurt to hose that area down with brake cleaner once you get the pan sealed up. Just to check later if the rear main is weeping or not.
    1 point
  19. desoto1939

    cooling additive??

    I have written to the Prestone corp regarding what specific product line in their products will be the best one to use in our cast iron blocks in requard to the IAT versus the OAT versions. When I receie their reply I will post the information. Rich Hartung
    1 point
  20. I couldn’t deal with that black monster very long. Yesterday I built a new tensioner from a used derailleur. I drilled the rivets away and removed this stuff. I ripped up this funky little bracket to get the bushing out. I turned the flange off of it, and then pressed it into this Shimano adapter arm. I drilled that little hole for the spring to seat. So here it is on the bench. And here it is on the bike. It needs some cleanup and adjustment, but it worked the first time! I still don’t have a front derailleur, and I have to move the chain by hand, but I won’t change from high range to low range under normal circumstances.
    1 point
  21. RNR1957NYer

    Show your tools.

    Shorter and longer, you say...
    1 point
  22. You can't have too many cranking amps available from the battery. The starter will only draw the amperage it needs to run. The most common issue for good cranking function is poor, or too small, battery cables. Larger is better. Make sure all connections are clean and tight and the cables aren't corroded. Also, be sure your battery cables are 0 gauge at minimum. If the cables are too small, or there is a lot of corrosion within the cable and/or connections, then the cables will consume some of the available amperage which will cause a voltage drop at the starter motor. This voltage drop and poor current flow will be more detrimental to the starter than to much battery.
    1 point
  23. Good idea. Have not done this… next ride will be the folowing weekend. Grtz
    1 point
  24. If it cranks easily and there's no traffic, you could put it in neutral and cut the engine off and let it roll downhill going at speed. Then you know if it's a squeaky fan belt or something with the motor. Could test it with clutch pedal pressed and out also.
    1 point
  25. could very well be.. I have no idea how long ago the last clutch job was. The previous owner did that. On the other hand, the noise does not change if I push down the clutch pedal....thanks for the suggestion.
    1 point
  26. kencombs

    Dwell 28 degrees

    My simplistic definition of dwell: The duration of a completed circuit from a coil primary to ground, expressed in degrees of rotation. The latter is important, the time varies by RPM, the degree doesn't. A points system can't vary that. An electronic system can change according to it's map as stated. So, I would expect the dwell, expressed in degrees to change as does the time. That is exactly why my project will be getting a GM controller, slant six modded distributor and ecoil. TO THE OP: Is your dwell a constant 28deg, or do you see a variance with rpm changes? I would almost bet that the current version of the product your using may be different that older models as the maker 'remapped' it to fix issues or improve it. I do know that they fixed them to keep from burning out when the ignition was left on without the engine running.
    1 point
  27. Veemoney

    Show your tools.

    I have this old Craftsman toolbox that mounts to a wall. Has images inside the cabinet to help identify where certain tools go for those who have trouble figuring things out.
    1 point
  28. I reshaped the frame stays and re-centered my lacing a bit. I swapped a couple jamb nuts, and it all finally fits! Now I need to reshape the dropouts so I can tighten the chain. But I did get out and rideit, sloppy chain and all, and the gears were okay. I used the old tourniquet method to bring the stays in a little closer together. First ride with the new Sturmey Archer hub. The chain is too sloppy. She gleams!
    1 point
  29. wallytoo

    USMC Flag

    i know several folks in my area that fly the marine corps flag. they didn't serve, but they have a relative (grandson in one case, son in another) that was/is a marine. i see it as honoring them by flying it. i have many friends who served in the USMC; not one is bothered by someone flying the flag. i would only add, fly a good flag, don't let it get ratty/tattered (remove it when it starts to show wear).
    1 point
  30. Latest acquisition. 1979/1980 trike called, wait for it, DeSoto. It's missing the rear basket but that little platform where the basket was sure looks inviting for a small engine.
    1 point
  31. I use a 6 V Optima battery and have never had an issue. One of my buddies just started his hot rod with an 8 year old Optima. Started right up. They last. Hth, Jeff
    1 point
  32. I don't want to step on anyone toes, so my answer are for others who may stumble on this thread in future with fuel gauge problems. As mentioned earlier this fuel gauge unlike newer electromagnetic types. Newer work on coils on the principal of one sender resistor connected to ground activating a couple of coils. This older thermostatic type works on balance principal and has no coils in gauge, but 2 heated bimetal blades. Sender has 2 output and resistor is not grounded as in newer models. So there is always a certain current value flowing from both sender terminals to gauge and whatever current his highest, needle will move correspondingly. This principal is high end, more precise and makes gauge less bouncy. Shorting one terminal to ground will heat up the bimetal and needle will move faster and may do harm. Included here is 3 page copy of gauge and sender testing from Chrysler manual. And another 3 page from the 1950 Service reference book. Pages from Chrysler Shop Manual C28 C30 C33.pdf Pages from 1950 Gauges.pdf
    1 point
  33. You gauge is unlike the modern gauges used today. All the advices given here to test it is for the later type. Your gauge has two thermostatic bimetal blades and measure the balance between the two resistors from the sender. This principal gives a more precise and calmer reading. There is a lengthy 2 page description and calibration procedure in shop manual. Seems people are back at the crude 6v reducers again 🤬
    1 point
  34. Did you take apart the original sending unit? They are quite basic, try cleaning up the windings and contact and make sure the grounding contact arm inside is clean and functioning.
    1 point
  35. The 1947 WH48 truck should use sender 591146 . This sender doesn't work at all like you have yours hooked up . The dash gauge has three terminals , one marked IGN for 6 volts . the other two terminals on your gauge are marked 1 and 2 . The 1 and 2 terminals go to the terminals on your sender . The float in the tank varies the resistance ( or the ground ) on a winding in the sender .
    1 point
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