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  1. capt den

    capt den

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  2. Sam Buchanan

    Sam Buchanan

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  3. Los_Control

    Los_Control

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  4. Bryan

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/07/2022 in all areas

  1. i am always amazed at what some people can do. the talent is endless infinity i am better at the small stuff. i like to take things apart that are seemingly impossible to get apart, then clean,lube and put back together so the next owner will have it easy. brake parts are a good example. of course, mike here is way ahead of me for what he does, and imagines, when the rest of us see junk. there was an old 20's ford mostly rotted away and sunk into the ground near me, but when i looked carefully you could see good parts still there for a project.nothing is beyond our dedication when we want to see the potential. i look forward to seeing mikes car roaring down the track. capt den
    2 points
  2. One of the items at the top of my punch list when the P15 was purchased was the conversion to a dual-chamber master cylinder and front disc brakes. For various reasons I elected to rebuild the stock brakes when I returned the car to service, but the time has come to make the jump to discs. Traffic is getting increasingly hectic in our rapidly growing area and I think the $$$$'s will be well-spent for peace of mind and added safety. Based on positive reviews on this forum I elected to go with the Scarebird conversion. This thread will offer details of the upgrade so future readers will have a resource for consideration. My kit includes aluminum hubs but I see this option is no longer listed on the Scarebird website. In its place is a more bare-bones conversion that requires modification of the stock spindles. But here is what was included in my kit--documentation is included and the components appear to be of high quality. The first step is to remove the stock drums and backing plates with all the original components. The photo below shows why the front brakes have not had optimum stopping power because half of each shoe is barely touching the drum. This is most likely due to improper major shoe adjustment. But one reason I want to move away from the drum brakes is because of the finicky adjustment process which sometimes requires chants and the sprinkling of chicken blood around the shop...... No longer needed: Here is the spindle with all the stock brake components removed along with decades of caked on grease and road debris. This will be a great opportunity to make sure all the grease zerks are functional. Here is the kit caliper bracket bolted to the stock spindle, the fit is perfect. More to come.
    1 point
  3. Thank you Lord, they have my camshaft!! Delta just called me. I thought it was USPS Washington state at first. They've already ground my cam and resurfaced 8 lifters. $ 164.28 They kept it per specs, making sure exhaust lift/durations are the same, intake lift/durations are the same. Refinished the bearing journals/cleaned up. I had told them on the request sheet didn't want to increase the duration or lift to one of these 4500 rpm types. Requested a spec sheet..see what I get. I AM HAPPY. 1 1/2 weeks messing with USPS..was about to put in a claim.
    1 point
  4. Los_Control

    201 runs hot

    I'm not a expert in anything .... I feel and have created my own opinion ... More then I know from proven facts. IMHO, anyone that knows how to remove a distribution tube would want to slide a flat bar through it with a hook on the end to catch the tube and pull it out. When you find the minerals are so thick through the tube you can not slide a bar through it. I'm kinda guessing it is dissimilar metals that may aggravate the the issue. Same time here in West Texas we have the hardest water I have ever seen ... Moved here from New Mexico which also has hard water ... not like this though. The real issue I had to use a hammer to drive the bar through the minerals .... Then hook a chain to it and some weight to pull the bar back out. Then manually chiseled away at the minerals to clean it out the best I could. I do not think any chemical would remove those minerals. The tube needs replaced .... I feel more then I know, I would need to hollow out the tube in order to pull it out anyways. .... I would like to drive it a bit and access the engine before I pull it out .... In my mind manually clearing the tube was not a waste of time ... the engine now runs cool. Has been known for decades about the casting sand left over in engines from when they were poured in the foundry. A quick simple test is to open the petcock on the side of the block to drain the coolant. Typically the sand gathers here as it is the lowest point of the block. If you open the petcock and have good flow, probably no sand in the engine. .... If you remove the petcock & still have no flow, is full of sand and vinegar would not fix this. You need to manually remove the soft plugs and remove the sand. If you have a stuck T-stat, vinegar will not fix this. On the other hand, the vinegar I use is 4% acidity ... sold at the grocery store more for a cleaner then something you want to cook with at 2% acidity. I think it was $2 a gallon. I "feel" if a person goes through the process of making sure all the mechanical's of the cooling system are working as they should be .... The vinegar will be a great asset to help remove any loose rust & scale in the block just to complete and finish off your hard efforts on cleaning the cooling system. Vinegar will not fix your T-stat, I feel it is worthwhile using because it will not damage our Brass or aluminum radiators.
    1 point
  5. capt den

    201 runs hot

    so you are saying that running vinegar in the system is a waste of time and money? i tried beet juice. it did nothing but the car smelled nice. capt den
    1 point
  6. Mark Your 46-48 radtior uses an R-3 NON-Pressurized cap that is the same that I use on my 39 desoto. I checked my Atlas catalog to verify the correct cap Number. NO PRESSURIZED CAP IS TO BE USED. Rich Hartung
    1 point
  7. Been trying to spend at least 5 times a week to keep this thing on track... Yea ole 6 banger is sitting in the frame rails... Old 3 speed is sitting pretty too... Had to cobble up a tranny mount into it to hold all this stuff... Front frame rails had some issues.... Before During After.... We have a cobby hobby going on here....
    1 point
  8. If it is a 1953 block, there is a chance that it has the block that was designed for use with the fluid torque drive what shared the oil with the "new" converter. They may have made the change in the block to support that even if they did not drill the back of the block with the hole that fed out of the block. James
    1 point
  9. Use Google for your searches, works much better: site:p15-d24.com color change speedometer This search returned several threads.
    1 point
  10. I would send it to an instrument repair specialist. About 12 yrs ago I had an extra speedometer out of a junker and thought I would take it apart, restore the translucent colors, put it together again and put it in my car. It never made it. In the process of taking it apart I broke it in several ways that I was unable to repair. I chalked it up to a learning experience.
    1 point
  11. Your light knob is the same as my '42. The switch with the bullb in it is the same as amy '38 Dodge sedan the stem of the switch is hollow and the bulb lights up and a jewel on the knob lights up for high beam. My '41 Chrysler coupe and '42 Fargo have a jewel in the dash above the speedo for high beam indicator. Your used switch looks like the right one. Take it apart by prying the tabs on top and clean it up they are very robust.
    1 point
  12. In the search box type 3 words color change speedometer. While in the box, look down at the open menu tab about mid way. You have to click/check the "all of the search term words" . I wish someone would make that the default. "Any of the search term words" is the default now, and won't find anything.
    1 point
  13. Marc, do a search, this has been discussed in detail a number of times....
    1 point
  14. Your symptoms sound to like what would happen if you accidentally used a 12V solenoid, as 6V (or 7.2V) wouldn't be enough to fully engage.
    1 point
  15. Just reminds me of the story .... We never knew we could not weld cast iron .... so we just went ahead & did it anyways. Think about all the kids that created dual exhaust on a six cylinder engine back in the 50's. They did not know they could cut it and weld in a new piece .... So they just did it. And it worked and they continued to do it again. I really do not want to tell you about Grandpa Carl .... sold my sister a 1962 chebby chevyII station wagon. The engine on the car threw a rod through the block .... Grandpa welded a patch back on it, fixed the bearing issues and the engine ran great. I also drove a 1987 Astro van with the block welded up. It was perfect. We are told that we need special welding techniques to weld a set of headers for a straight 6, or patch up a hole in the side of a engine block .... Back in the 50's they just fixed it with no questions. Is your crack worth fixing? I have no clue. I can say it can be fixed .... I also can say these engines are not rare so it can be replaced.
    1 point
  16. Have it boiled and pressure tested, if it passes, have them apply a fresh coat of paint........and then install it.
    1 point
  17. Why do you want to drill it out? Did it not do a satisfactory job of oiling? Was there evidence of lack of lubrication? I'm sure they had a reason for using the bore sizes that they used. Don't try to reinvent the wheel here.
    1 point
  18. I used a 10 circuit fuse block. Not enough fuses in my opinion.. 12 maybe. i used fuse links for the charge circuit as they will take loads better than a fuse. Could use a 70’s dodge truck as a reference guide.
    1 point
  19. In ordering new wheel cylinders, I found out that the cylinders in my truck were not the correct part. This truck came with the stepped bore 1-1/4" x 1-3/8" cylinders, paired with equal length shoe lining on each. In reality the correct part for a B4B is a straight bore 1-3/8", combined with shoes of unequal length. Does it matter? Probably not, the brakes worked fine in the past 20 years. So now, I have these old step bore cylinders up for grabs for FREE if anybody wants them. I would hate the throw them away, because they're hard to find. The rubber parts are like new. The cylinders need to be sleeved. Sleeving can be done by these guys: http://www.karpspb.com/ These step bore cylinders are correct for the following models: B1B, B2B, and B3B up to 2267098 (Detroit) and 85315925 (San Leandro) Mopar p/n : 1271432 (front right) 1271433 (front left) EIS p/n EW3595 / EW6363 (front left) EW3596 / EW6354 (front right)
    1 point
  20. Young Ed

    Swap meet score

    1 point
  21. Hey don’t beat yourself up, you weren’t even on this forum a week ago…. Must have joined for a reason 😊
    1 point
  22. Well I took everyone’s advise and I was able to install the hood ornament tonight. Let me know what you think? I have another question. Is there supposed to be some type of gasket between the hood and the ornament?
    1 point
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