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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/08/2021 in all areas

  1. not sure of the warranty....I assure you it was not as today.....but you can rest easy, NTSB lists no recalls for a 1948 D24
    2 points
  2. I did get an elbow and changed the routing of 1 of the lines. I can remove the starter now without removing the oil line. Thanks for the help Dave
    2 points
  3. Just from appearances,I ain't buying the "freshly rebuilt engine". I strongly suggest if you do buy it that you consider converting it over to power disc brakes up front,as well as power steering if a 16 year old girl is going to be driving it. Not to mention 3 point shoulder harnesses up front,seat belts in the back,and radial tires all around. A little bit of "safe" is worth more than all the "sorry" in the world.
    2 points
  4. I applaud your idea of resurecting a 49 Plymouth, but please do not give it to your daughter. These cars were ok when they were built and everyone was driving the same type of car on poor roads and the usual speed driven around town was about 25 mph. Today with normal around town speeds of 40 to 50 mph these cars are death traps. They lack seat belts, crumple zones air bags, good suspension and brakes. To buy and fix up a 49 Plymouth to daily driver condition will probably cost between $5000 and $10000. For that money you can buy a road ready 10 to 15 yearold car that will serve your daughter much better. About 20 years ago my son, then about 20 yrs old, was riding with a friend in a nearly new Dodge Neon. The driver zigged when he should have zagged and drove into an abuttment on an elevated road in Boston, Ma. The car was totalled, but thanks to the air bags both young men walked away from the wreck with only a few bruises. I shudder to think what may have happened if they had been in a 70 year oldcollector car. Ok, I'll get off my soap box now.
    2 points
  5. For some time I've considered how to get really big brakes on my Plymouth. It wasn't so much that I felt a need as I realized that you could. My Plymouth P17 has 10 inch brakes, a similar year DeSoto has 11 inch and Chrysler Windsors have 12 inch. Let me tell you a 12 inch Chrysler drum fills a 15 inch wheel! I've read about other people's adventures putting disc brakes on Plymouths and it just seemed to me to be more work and engineering than it was worth. Chrysler across its line of cars had a continuity of design. As cars got bigger and heavier they placed bigger brakes on them of exactly the same design. Thus a Plymouth uses the very same hydraulics as a Chrysler. Which for the company meant lower costs of stocking parts. For service it meant there were no surprises or re-training for technicians. For manufacturing it meant associated parts could be the same thus again lowering costs. Because high volume cars like Plymouth and Dodge paid the engineering costs, the company could afford to make better DeSotos and Chryslers. That is the real beauty of Mopar cars. Since Chrysler Brakes CAN be put on a Plymouth, you knew somebody WOULD. And I am certainly not the only one who has done this. I studied the shop manuals and parts supplier's sites and found that the king pins in the front were the same but the Chrysler spindles had Torrington Needle Bearings in the top (thus a different P/N for the King Pin Set). Torrington discontinued the bearing Chrysler used decades ago. I found an NOS King Pin Set for my project at a reasonable price with the needle bearings. In retrospect I think one of the reasons the bearings were discontinued is that they tend to get stuck and they skid more than roll. One supplier sells a kit with a thick bushing in place of the needle bearing (at a good price too) and this may be a better choice. Speaking of bearings, even the wheel bearings and seals are the same. If you are on a treasure hunt you will need the spindles, backing plates, drums and the tubes from wheel cylinder to wheel cylinder. Being kind of picky I bought a left handed 1/2 x 20 tap & die to clean up the threads on the left side for the lug bolts (most tap & die sets have right handed 1/2 x 20 in them). I sand blasted everything and put some paint on them just to keep the rust at bay. Tomorrow I begin to install the front brakes. 6BB2C2CC-563E-4F8F-8FA6-F7DB6613C9A9_1_201_a.heic
    1 point
  6. I've also tried for a 75 Dodge Dart, and that's also a no-go.....
    1 point
  7. I've gotten a few of those "Extend your Warranty" calls also. It's funny...when they connect me with a representative, and I try to extend the warranty on my P15, they hang up on me! Go figure.😂😂
    1 point
  8. Good question, I was wondering about the warranty myself. I got one of those spam calls the other day and they said my warranty was about to expire, haha.
    1 point
  9. You can drive an old car every day, I do. It's really not that big of a deal. Make sure it's mechanically up to snuff and keep her in the slow lane. She'll be fine. Me personally, i don't care for 4 doors but if she likes it, go for it. Rusty hope kit for the front and a new rear axle will take care of the finicky Lockheeds.
    1 point
  10. The first time I drove the P15 I had a one gallon lawnmower gas tank duct tapped to the fender with a gravity feed line to the carb. Less than 5 mph around the block. E brake only. What could go wrong. Had a smile on my face all the way. A year after that the car was road worthy. Keep working on your car when you have time. It will all be worth it when it's on the road.
    1 point
  11. Thank you all so much for your replies. My kids and I think it's a cool car and we like to get our hands dirty wrenching on cars. In 2015, I resto modded my high school ride, a 1964 VW Beetle. We had fun working on it and bringing it back to life. It is my daily driver. My daughter will be of driving age in one year. So I was thinking we would get the '49 road worthy and safe in that time frame. But I am thinking maybe y'all are right. It would probably not be good for her as her first car. Safety issues and reliability are my main concern. Even with my newly restored bug, I had little hiccups that kept the car grounded for a day or few. I wouldn't want her to go out to the school parking lot and find that she can't pull out of there due to something breaking down. We're still going to go look at the car. But, I doubt that I will buy it now that I see it in this way. For the past few days I have been looking and learning on this forum and I gotta say, you all are an amazing group of people. Very knowledgeable, helpful and kind. Thank you for your encouragement and advice. I'll keep you posted.
    1 point
  12. In recent years I've owned a 49 Packard and a 49 Chrysler; both needed a lot of TLC and both had the same exact backstory: they were a good running/driving/looking car that was bought by a loving father for their teenage kid. In both cases it didn't work out and the car got parked. In both cases, by the time I got hold of it, the car had slid downhill from neglect and it took a lot of work to get close to where it was beforehand. I like the idea of trying to swing 2 vehicles, one modern (can be something cheap, like a 10 year old Kia) and then this. That first year or two of driving are tough enough, judging by various family and friends (including myself.) I wasn't too rough on the body of the old Impala I started with, though I did add some dents & scrapes; constantly broke down, though. One sister totaled her first car (and nearly didn't survive) while the other really put her little car through the wringer. Just in my little rural high school class there were 2 cars totaled one year, both on the same curve. That said, I love the Plymouth and if she really is committed to it, maybe you can make it work. It could be a fantastic experience for both of you and could change her life forever (in a positive way.)
    1 point
  13. wagoneer

    Project Elise - 50 B2B

    Tonight I punched out the bottom two large welch plugs, and flushed out the block! Some silt but very little at the bottom, just some gross coolant water. The old welch plugs look solid and steel, pointing again to recent rebuild. Thanks @keithb7 for the great video on the topic. I also took out the petcock and cleaned it out. I know so much more now that I've gone this far into the engine, and now reading the manual makes so much more sense! Project Elise is my learning project to prepare my Chrysler, and it's the best $400 (cost before expenses of courses).. I've spent. Tomorrow onto the oil pump and oil pressure relief valve!
    1 point
  14. As cool as it is, and I don’t want to be a Debbie-Downer, I agree with the sentiment that it may not be a good idea for a young, new driver. Is there a guardian mechanic in the home to inspect the car, often? These cars need a fair amount maintenance. A fairly competent person on the tools goes a long way here too. Is there an experienced person who’ll spot car trouble on the horizon? A decent troubleshooting mentor maybe? To help keep ownership expenses down. Does the potential young new owner have any interest in the mechanical workings of an old car? A desire to learn? These points to consider can make the experience better. Or lack of, quite bad. A $2500 modern used import car could really go a long ways to make your life at home, a whole lot simpler. Just an opinion.
    1 point
  15. The whole ebay experience has certainly evolved. Like all the “good old days” stories, e-bay was so great 15 years ago. Easy peasy and freight was cheap and fast. Ahh the good old days. I have learned to get my car out and network. When you are passionate about your old car, it’s contagious. Used parts offerings begin to appear. Your Mopar contacts list grows. I have had very good success finding old flathead mopar folks who like to help me out. Passing along parts, or leads to parts my way. Just today at a car show. A guy sees my Chrysler. He informs me of a 1936 Desoto coupe that was parked in 1985. In a local person’s home garage. Never moved since. I have an address to go check it out. Indeed I will. Last week at a local car meet & greet in a mall parking lot I met a guy who just gutted a 1937 Dodge 4 dr sedan. He’s hot rodding it. Engine, clutch, tranny, driveshaft, suspension, steering, brakes and complete rear axle assy were offered to me. Yowzers! Indeed I will sniff out that opportunity. Great spare parts! I am firmly convinced the old Mopar cars and good used parts are still out there, in decent numbers. You just gotta lure them out. Attract folks who have them. It takes time. It takes effort. It’s worth it. Ebay costs me money, dearly. Local finds, are where its at!
    1 point
  16. Times are a changing. I think we are all old enough to remember Brick & mortar stores ... I apologize to the few that are young and do not know. We are talking about ordering a part off of the internet .... We are talking a Blessing & A curse. A: we get more access to parts we never would have before the internet. B: we get idiots to send us parts we did not want. I love you Loren just as you are .... You deserve to vent. Same time we all vent, but as friends your vent carries weight. Same time I am the Arse that needs special mouth filter protection ... Love to hear your rant @Loren
    1 point
  17. Loren...........not sure if you were around when I had the 41 Plymouth but with a name like Andrew Douglas I can't help to be desendent from some Scotish tightwads....so....I wanted a 1941 Plymouth clock...the only one that kept coming up on epay was around $800 US which made it about $1400 Australian at the time...I wanted the clock, not the rest of the car.....anyway I thought........I'll take a few screen dumps of the nice clock pictures and resize them, eventually got one the same size as the dash hole and glued it to a piece of clear plastic then inserted that into the reversed clock delete dash piece and installed my "new clock" in the dash.......looked great, kept perfect time.....well twice daily it did and only cost me a few minutes, time that my new clock kept .....sometimes...........lol...........don't have a pic and as I sold the car I've always wondered whether the new owner got the clock working properly....nah..I didn't tell him..........lol................andyd
    1 point
  18. When I had my car painted I took the hoods off. When I put them back on I attached the chrome strip to the cowl support first then slid the hoods on one at a time, then fastened the front of the chrome strip in place. Ithink I used a small block of wood to hold up the front end the chrome strip while I inserted the hoods.
    1 point
  19. DJK

    New paint

    1 point
  20. RNR1957NYer

    New paint

    Two winters ago I started a panel-by-panel body repair and paint project on my P12. A couple years earlier I shot my newly louvered hood with DupliColor black lacquer and clear through my $10 Harbor Freight HVLP gun, and with a lot of wet sanding it came out pretty good. Since I was working an hour or two here and there on the panel by panel job and I didn't want to spend as much time cleaning up as painting, I instead used DupliColor spray bomb universal black, and eventually the entire car was painted (except for the roof, which was spotted in). I saved every receipt for anything I spent - sandpaper, filler, primer, paint, trim clips, etc. and in a year's time I had a little more than $900 into the "fluff and buff". Buying spray cans is not very economical - probably would have spent $600 if I sprayed quarts, and being black the color was easy to keep matching with the cans. My only snafu was painting in high humidity a couple times - couldn't polish the blushing completely out. (yes, I like red wheels - shoot me!)
    1 point
  21. Andydodge

    Cowl Vent Gasket

    Pete.........a few years ago i ordered a cowl vent seal from Steele Rubber for my 1940 Dodge, it wasn't cheap by the time it arrived here in Oz and it was the wrong size, I emailed & rang them and they treated me like a piece of crap........told me I didn't know what I was talking about.............now I go out of my way to tell people what a shithouse business they are and would not recommend them to my worst enemy..........have had excellent dealings with Bernbaums tho'............regards, andyd
    1 point
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