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PatS....

Head Gasket...Dry or Gasket Sealer?

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The article at Allpar written by the owner of the 1951 DeSoto Suburban mentions that he is "bitterly opposed to putting head gaskets on dry. I have used Gasgacinch with no ensuing problems"

http://www.allpar.com/cars/desoto/suburban-1951.html

I have always put them on dry, but that doesn't mean it's right for these engines.

I am almost ready to put the cylinder head back on the rebuilt industrial 251 engine I have been cleaning up and was wondering what your opinions were on the subject.

Thanks

Pat

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Pat I did mine dry, I believe a couple of folks have given the engine side a bit of permatex spray just to hepl it from walking during head installation. If you are using studs instead of bolts, this probably isn't an issue. I believe the factory manual for the P15 series says to do a dry install. If your surfaces are clean and true, dry would be the way to go INMHO. Good to hear you're making progress. Let us know when you get the big boy fired up.

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Guest Nile Limbaugh

I've rebuilt several engines over the years, both overheads and flatheads and never used any sealer on the head gaskets. Never had any problems. Just finished my 37 with no problems; I've got about 1000 miles on her so far.

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It doesn't really matter. I have used High Tack which works well when you might expect a leaker. But I have also done it dry. Clean is a must!!

Bob

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Big block Ford gaskets of the 60 s blew head gaskets all the time until someone discovered alunimum spray paint!! They used that onthe gasket and the head as a sealer. Let it get tacky and put gasket and head on and torque her down.

Solved that problen on the Ford. I do the same thing with all my gaskets and not had a problem

Lou

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There is a guy named Jon Robinson who is a guru on the Desotoland forum who recommends soaking the sandwiched copper gaskets in your bathtub (filled with enough water to cover the entire gasket) overnight prior to installing. I have never tried this but I have a lot of respect for the work Jon does. In the old days I always sprayed the gasket with aluminum paint prior to installling. If I remember correctly I installed the gasket on my engine dry and I have no leaks to date.

Don Coatney

block.jpg

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Every time I've put my aluminum head on (more times than I care to remember!:( ) I've always used a FelPro gasket and used Gasgacinch on the copper side and left the blue side clean. They usually seal up fine, as long as I was careful to properly seal the headbolts/studs and all of the miscellaneous screws/bolts that screw into the head.

Marty

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Ya know, I have been a professional mechanic for almost 40 years now. I can say this.... the professionals that I have worked with over the years go both ways on this issue. I know guys that would not think of assembling anything without sealer and others that hate the stuff. Personally, if the parts are in good order, meaning the surfaces are smooth, clean and level, I don't use any but a questionable surface will always receive some sealer. Also, mounting something in a confined space where a gasket may slip or slide...I will apply a little sealer to the item that will be removable from the car. This keeps things in place and makes removal easier and cleaner. But all things being equal... I prefer no sealers except at a point where two gaskets might butt up to one another. Just do whatever you like because that is the way the pros do it every day.:confused:

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Ya know, I have been a professional mechanic for almost 40 years now. I can say this.... the professionals that I have worked with over the years go both ways on this issue. I know guys that would not think of assembling anything without sealer and others that hate the stuff. Personally, if the parts are in good order, meaning the surfaces are smooth, clean and level, I don't use any but a questionable surface will always receive some sealer. Also, mounting something in a confined space where a gasket may slip or slide...I will apply a little sealer to the item that will be removable from the car. This keeps things in place and makes removal easier and cleaner. But all things being equal... I prefer no sealers except at a point where two gaskets might butt up to one another. Just do whatever you like because that is the way the pros do it every day.:confused:

Well said Bob!

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Some great advice, thanks guys.

Don, I have most of Jon's posts re: fluid drive.

The guy really knows his stuff.

I've never heard of soaking the gasket. I wonder what it does?

Pat

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