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Sam Buchanan

Which rear engine seal for a 218?

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At the next oil change on the '48 P15 I'll probably drop the pan to replace the gasket and might as well replace at least the bottom half of the rear seal while it's accessible to slow down a persistent leak. There is the original rope-style seal and a more modern version, which one seems to be yielding the best service history? 

Edited by Sam Buchanan

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You most likely will have to replace what's in it already especially if you are going to only do the lower half.... 50% fix.

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Not on Mopars, but on older Y block Fords (notorious back in the day for rear main leaks), I've replaced the bottom only with some success.  Using a small brass drift and small hammer, compress the upper half on both ends as far as possible.  Use pieces cut from the new upper section to pack into the resulting cavity. Coat ends with gasket maker and  install the bottom half in the normal manner.\\No guarantee, but it works sometimes!

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Ok, another question....if I decide to pull the transmission, clutch and flywheel for a complete seal replacement, what are y'all using for an arbor to realign the pressure plate and clutch disc when everything goes back together?

 

And if that happens, which seal now seems to be giving best service?

Edited by Sam Buchanan

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Sam...........from experience I'd be checking on whats there first before buying a replacement............the 1941 Pltmouth I had should of had the rope seal, I had a full Best Gasket 230 gasket set but it didn't have the rope seal, which was fair enough......so I bought the rope seal.......it had the neoprene seal...............lol................but it didn't have either of the side seals which accounted for the major oil leaks...........lol.............I'd check first..............andyd

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54 minutes ago, Andydodge said:

Sam...........from experience I'd be checking on whats there first before buying a replacement............the 1941 Pltmouth I had should of had the rope seal, I had a full Best Gasket 230 gasket set but it didn't have the rope seal, which was fair enough......so I bought the rope seal.......it had the neoprene seal...............lol................but it didn't have either of the side seals which accounted for the major oil leaks...........lol.............I'd check first..............andyd

 

The rope seal has been installed in hundreds of thousands of engines for decades, was just wondering if the newer seals are much better. I suspect the seal in my engine has never been changed.

 

Any advice on aligning the clutch assembly during fit-up? Is there a particular tool, other than the arbor described in the factory manual, that we can use?

Edited by Sam Buchanan

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4 minutes ago, Sam Buchanan said:

 

The rope seal has been installed in hundreds of thousands of engines for decades, was just wondering if the newer seals are much better. 

 

Any advice on aligning the clutch assembly during fit-up? Is there a particular tool, other than the arbor described in the factory manual, that we can use?

My take on the seal. The newer neoprene seals can be done right the first time by most anyone.  The ropes need some technique or feel that only comes from doing one or a lot

Edited by kencombs

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3 minutes ago, kencombs said:

My take on the seal. The newer neoprene seals can be done right the first time by most anyone.  The ropes need some technique or feel that only comes from doing one or a lot

 

That is a useful datapoint...thanks!

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To align the clutch assembly, I suggest you use a 6 inch length of 3/4 hardwood dowelling, which should be a good fit inside the clutch plate splines and also into the pilot bushing. Fit it thru the pressure plate and clutch plate, then insert it into the pilot bushing, then do up the bolts sequentially a turn at a time, then remove the dowell. Alternatively, use a spare gearbox input shaft if you have one. No fancy tools needed.

That works for my 29 and 38 Plymouths and should be same for yours, tho you should ckeck before you start

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Most any parts store sell alignment tools for a couple of bucks.  The one for my 218 was 1" x 10 tooth tool.

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7 hours ago, westaus29 said:

To align the clutch assembly, I suggest you use a 6 inch length of 3/4 hardwood dowelling, which should be a good fit inside the clutch plate splines and also into the pilot bushing. Fit it thru the pressure plate and clutch plate, then insert it into the pilot bushing, then do up the bolts sequentially a turn at a time, then remove the dowell. Alternatively, use a spare gearbox input shaft if you have one. No fancy tools needed.

That works for my 29 and 38 Plymouths and should be same for yours, tho you should ckeck before you start

4 hours ago, ptwothree said:

Most any parts store sell alignment tools for a couple of bucks.  The one for my 218 was 1" x 10 tooth tool.

 

Thanks guys, that is the info I needed. Since I haven't had the clutch apart I didn't have dia/spline details in front of me.

Edited by Sam Buchanan

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Probably late to the discussion, but I strongly recommend the best gasket neoprene - My car had the bolt on external rope seal in it and two drain holes (assume that's right not really sure why they are there) in the main cap. I dropped the main cap cleaned it thoroughly and I mean spotlessly, jb welded the two holes shut and loosened the other main caps and installed the upper and lower in the motor. Unbelieveable result - it has not leaked a drop since.

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