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thebeebe5

Required maintenance for my ‘37 windshield crank?

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Wondering if there’s any recommended maintenance for the windscreen opening mechanism.  I looked through the service manual and did not find anything.  Definitely do not want this thing breaking due to lack of care. 

CDB85720-B695-427A-A6CC-D4CBF0BEEA24.jpeg

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There's little you can do short of removing the dash panel.  If it cranks easily and does not bind, I would leave it alone.

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2 hours ago, sser2 said:

There's little you can do short of removing the dash panel.  If it cranks easily and does not bind, I would leave it alone.

Good advice. I would open and close it often to keep everything moving. I always liked the unique crank handle that was used only on the "37 Chrysler built cars. There was a guy in the Plymouth Bulletin a few years back that has a '38 with a crank out windshield that I had never seen on any other than a "37. He is from Chile and after contacting him, he posted a photo of his car and it indeed had the opening windshield. It occurred to me later that somewhere along the line, someone may have installed a '38 nose on a '37 (perhaps) but I never investigated it any further. All '38's I have seen before had a fixed non opening windshield.

John R

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dash dosn't have to be out to remove it, but if it ain't broke, don't pull it.

 

Do find a complete replacement in good condition.  Especially the tape or build up one good spare from many parts cars.

 

The major wear is the gears, they are zinc/pot metal.   Can always stand a spray cleaning and perhaps a squirt of white grease from a sqoosh tubed aerosol can.

 

I had mine out, cleaned it, greased it, its a bear to get to but dooable if you can work upside down for a good bit.   I also pulled a complete and functional spare from a parts car before I listed all the other parts for sale.

 

What I'm seeing on the aftermarket is one fella that advertises new made units on AACA, they look to be poor quality, at least visually.   But, since its only one fella making them, not much room to choose really.   I think I read a couple folks bought them and the center shaft ain't long enough to put the hand crank on.

Edited by Sharps40

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Thanks, fellows.  

 

It works.  I use it EVERY time I enjoy a drive which in Arizona is rear ‘round.  It seems a little stiff is why I am asking.  And looking at the metal strip that raises and supports the window itself made me wonder first of all how the heck it works (it’s perfectly smooth) and if I needed to give it periodic attention.  

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My '38 Dodge truck has a windshield crank like this one. Be gentle with it. The zinc/pot metal on mine broke. I was able to find a used replacement.

 

Pete

 

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17 hours ago, thebeebe5 said:

Thanks, fellows.  

looking at the metal strip that raises and supports the window itself made me wonder first of all how the heck it works (it’s perfectly smooth) and if I needed to give it periodic attention.  

A lot of ingenuity went into this design. If you noticed, the metal strip is a convex spring with perforations. Convex shape gives it rigidity necessary to support the windshield in open position. When windshield is cranked down, the strip flattens as it rolls over drum with cogs that fit into strip's perforations. This makes a compact yet sturdy mechanism.

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It has been so long since owned a Plymouth that had this type of windshield, I can't remember exactly how it worked. Thank you for explanation. Is there no way that some type of lube line oil or white lithium grease could be sprayed  where the shaft goes in? Just wondering.

John R

 

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Have to get to the gears from the back.   Squoosh em with WD40 or SillyKone if necessary, prolly need a long straw and a flashlight.

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Check out " Zoom Spout Oiler "  it has a long thin plastic straw and a squeeze bottle . It works good for lubricating things that are uphill .  A telescoping spout . image.png.9daae0e9ab91bd834cdd868f4a08fef2.png

Edited by Jerry Roberts

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The most critical lubrication point is worm gear. It has to be lubricated with moly or synthetic grease, applied in proper place and in proper quantity. WD40 may do more harm than good in a long run.

Windsield worm.jpg

Edited by sser2
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Love my crank out windshield. Gives a nice breeze. Bit too much noise out on the highway, but great when driving around town. 

 

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grease would be lovely, clean grease on clean gears best but.....wd40 wont hurt the worm gears and it will penetrate into the axle bores that are also dry/gunked/sticky and can't be reached with grease.   If nothing else, wd40 will at clean off 80 odd years of dried grease and dirt that is likely more wearing on the gear teeth than running dry or with a light oil only like wd40.  

Edited by Sharps40

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Looks like you are in a dry climate so rust from damp air isn't a concern, but I would give every joining place where pieces come together little light oil.  Tip for working underside of dashboard, remove the bottom seat cushion.  Nice view through the windshield.

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While your under there lube the oil cup on the back of the speedometer. If you are adventurous,pull your instrument lights and dust them off. Makes a noticeable difference in brightness.

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Cleaned mine up when I had the dash out. It had years of old stiff black grease in it. Used the white lithium to re-grease. It made a noticeable difference. Prior to that I shot WD-40 down it, cranked it up and down and wiped the black off the metal strip each time. It did help loosen it up. I’ll pick up a replacement if I ever see one.

 

 

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