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Frank Elder

Radiator question

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I realize there are oil coolers out  in the aftermarket like this one,

oilcooler.jpg

But what I am wondering is could you use an automatic transmission radiator such as this one,

700x500-K9avE57tBsV82xQx345195.jpg

To cool your oil instead.....I mean if it works for the tranny why not the engine? And yes I know it is not a requirement for our cars but I am still curious to see if it would help keep the oil from breaking down as fast.

Run the pressure line to the rad and the back to the bypass filter......do you think you would need to install a higher pressure spring in the oil pump to compensate for the extra distance and resistance it would cause?

Or would it be disaster waiting to happen....lol...

ValveCover.jpg

 

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How hot is your oil getting? Many larger diesel engines have engine oil coolers built in to the cooling system, but a typical automotive engine shouldn't need it unless you're pushing it to extremes, as in racing. The oil needs to reach a normal operating temperature of 180-190 degrees F for any trapped moisture to be expelled. Otherwise you get what you show in the bottom picture... sludge buildup. If your oil is approaching 200 degrees, or more, then you should consider adding an oil cooler.

Edited by Merle Coggins

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 Merle, my oil is fine...I just wondered if it would work, if it did I'm suppose the industry would have tried it by now. Kinda like my other idea to turn the cowl vent air system into a "ram air" system for the carb....still might do that.

 

Eneto, a very valid point...even in cold weather trans fluid is much "thinner" the engine oil.

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You could always use a thermal bypass system. I see these often in hydraulic oil coolers on heavy equipment. It's essentially a simple relief valve that will open and allow oil to bypass the oil cooler when the back pressure through the cooler it too high, for example when oil is cold and thick. 

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Yes, the oil cooler will extend the life of the oil and thus extend the service life of engine.  

 

The trans cooler is too big for these engines, think something like a power steering oil cooler in size.  Put the thermostat close to the engine as possible.

 

All the new v6 and 4 cylinder  Mopar cars come with oil cooler installed on engine now.  It’s not just for heavy duty applications, it’s for engine longevity.  In my 2014 Dodge Journey I’ve got the 3.6 liter vvt engine and it uses a water to oil cooler incorporated into the oil filer housing.

Edited by thisoldtruck

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remember the the cooler integral to the radiator will only cool to the water temp of the radiator. so if  your water temp is 200+ you would be heating the oil. 

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38 minutes ago, LazyK said:

remember the the cooler integral to the radiator will only cool to the water temp of the radiator. so if  your water temp is 200+ you would be heating the oil. 

 

If the coolant temp in the bottom of the radiator is 200+ you have other problems...

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