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FlashBuddy

$450 to Paint a Set of Wheels?!

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5 hours ago, Dave72dt said:

Your gun should have come with an instruction booklet that would include a conversion table for psi at the regulator to achieve the 8-10 psi at the cap.  There should also be a knob on the gun that restricts how far the trigger is pulled, thus limiting the amount of paint that is drawn through the nozzle.  You want to pull the trigger against the stop for consistency in the spray pattern. Your tip size can also make a big difference in how much goes on.  I use a 1.4 for epoxy and color, 1.7 for 2k primer and 1.3 for clear.  You'll want your compressor pressure higher than your gun pressure since there's a kick in -kick out variance on the compressor that would affect your gun pressure if relying solely on that one.

Man, you ask some tough questions:

20180819_184311-1328x747.jpg

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It's Omni epoxy according to the other posting, so yes, it's catalyzed.  Best advice I can offer on it is to let it fully cure.  It's chemically curing, not solvent evaporating.  A heat gun may speed it up a little but leaving it alone overnight will probably allow sanding the next day.  Check the tech sheet for cure time, sand time and if it's like most epoxies it'll sand hard.  Id'd start with no finer than 150 or 180 grit and if it won't cut, go to 80.  Once the surface is opened up it'll sand a bit easier.

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I've been trying 220 grit and it gums up pretty quick. I'll give it more time and switch to the recommended 120.

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Your paint doesn't appear to be high build so a 1.4 ,1.5 tip should work well.  What's in the gun for a tip?  30-35 psi at the gun.  Is there a knob on the side of the gun? If yes, turn that knob and the air screw on the bottom of the gun full open so you have all the air you need, then adjust your needle screw to get the spray pattern correct.  I use a sheet of mask paper taped to the wall for this.  Pull the trigger, let it go, don't hold it and then adjust accordingly.

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Tech sheet doesn't refer to it as high build, use a 1.3 to 1.6 tip has an induction time of 15 minutes which means it needs to simmer for that long before spraying, 15 minutes flash time before next coat, 30 minutes between next,  15 minutes drying time if 1 coat, 30 if two, so if you have 3 coats it's going to take much longer before you could topcoat it.   PPG may interpret those times differently and 1 or 2 coats differently.   Now, it also has a 3 day window for topcoating which allows the chems in the top coat to bite into the epoxy before it needs toi be scuffed and reapplied..  That also means it will be  easy to clog sandpaper for at least a day.

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I had a bad experience with Omni paint...lots of dry spray from it, and not enough pigment, so it required a lot of coats, but just a touch too heavy and it runs like water.  If I could go back, I would always choose the slowest drying hardner, it's more forgiving and only means a few extra minutes between coats and maybe a day before you really want to play with the parts.

 

Ive played with nice guns an drew cheap guns...they all actually work pretty well, as long as your pressure and pattern is right...but some paint is not fun no matter what gun it's in...Restoration Shop form TCP Global is a prefect example...says no thinning..well just tray and make that not dry spray on a 80/90 degree day...as for EPA laws....well it's the Wild West as far as my home shop goes

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19 hours ago, Dave72dt said:

Your gun should have come with an instruction booklet that would include a conversion table for psi at the regulator to achieve the 8-10 psi at the cap.  There should also be a knob on the gun that restricts how far the trigger is pulled, thus limiting the amount of paint that is drawn through the nozzle.  You want to pull the trigger against the stop for consistency in the spray pattern. Your tip size can also make a big difference in how much goes on.  I use a 1.4 for epoxy and color, 1.7 for 2k primer and 1.3 for clear.  You'll want your compressor pressure higher than your gun pressure since there's a kick in -kick out variance on the compressor that would affect your gun pressure if relying solely on that one.

Wow, I like how you tell it like it is. Yes, I did have a lot of dry spray. Great insight, thanks!

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Powdercoater charged me $250 for 4 wheels. Powdercoating is a lot less involved than painting so $450 for paint doesn't sound too out of whack. I wouldn't want to do them any cheaper. In retrospect I should have just rattle canned mine. 

I'm stuck in the past and still prefer a Binks Model 7. I used DuPont paint for a long time but switched to House of Kolor several years back. It isn't cheap but it's good paint and consistent. I don't do paintwork for anyone else anymore so price really doesn't matter too much. 

Most paint these days is too thin before you even put reducer in it. You just gotta be careful and take your time. Cutting down on solids is an easy way to make money and that's all that's about. They're just selling reducer at paint prices.

 

Edited by MackTheFinger

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12 hours ago, Plymouthy Adams said:

Got a real nice Binks 7 here at the house.....am sold on my Finex guns...

 

I'm sure those are great spray guns. I still have a couple of Sharpe 75's that IMO are at least as good as Binks. The 75's have a pressure gauge, sorta like a tire gauge; built in the handle. I never trusted those gauges. Most of the time they were covered with overspray anyway.🙂

 

Something else that should really be mentioned in any discussion about painting is the absolute necessity of a good mask or fresh air supply. I saw a video on YouTube of a guy painting in a booth without any protection at all, said his booth was so good he didn't need one. I wouldn't take that chance no matter what.

Edited by MackTheFinger

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Yeah, I was seriously thinking about rattle canning them. And when it all went to $h!t I was kicking myself. My rattle can work is some of my best stuff.

 

1950-Dodge-B2B-Hubcaps-Being-Prepped-and

Edited by FlashBuddy

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14 hours ago, MackTheFinger said:

Powdercoater charged me $250 for 4 wheels. Powdercoating is a lot less involved than painting so $450 for paint doesn't sound too out of whack. I wouldn't want to do them any cheaper. In retrospect I should have just rattle canned mine. 

I'm stuck in the past and still prefer a Binks Model 7. I used DuPont paint for a long time but switched to House of Kolor several years back. It isn't cheap but it's good paint and consistent. I don't do paintwork for anyone else anymore so price really doesn't matter too much. 

Most paint these days is too thin before you even put reducer in it. You just gotta be careful and take your time. Cutting down on solids is an easy way to make money and that's all that's about. They're just selling reducer at paint prices.

 

I call that the Walmart Effect. Take lawn mowers these days. They've cut down the handle height by 6 inches, shortened the pull cord by 4 inches, put on smaller diameter wheels that are made of plastic.... Think of the cost savings world wide.

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On ‎8‎/‎22‎/‎2018 at 8:33 AM, MackTheFinger said:

 

I'm sure those are great spray guns. I still have a couple of Sharpe 75's that IMO are at least as good as Binks. The 75's have a pressure gauge, sorta like a tire gauge; built in the handle. I never trusted those gauges. Most of the time they were covered with overspray anyway.🙂

 

Something else that should really be mentioned in any discussion about painting is the absolute necessity of a good mask or fresh air supply. I saw a video on YouTube of a guy painting in a booth without any protection at all, said his booth was so good he didn't need one. I wouldn't take that chance no matter what.

 

yessir, we had a funeral for a very young man at work who decided that the very excellent paint booth he worked it was so good that protection was not needed...the catalyzed paint breathed into his lungs had super adhesive properties...

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On ‎8‎/‎20‎/‎2018 at 7:34 AM, pflaming said:

I put on my rims, then started the engine in low gear and low idle. Made for easy sanding and painting. Not interested in putting money into a rim then cover it wit a hub cap and a lux ring. 

 

:o

 

Hope your jack stands are sturdy sir. What about the corrosion protection factor that paint has to offer?

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I didn't say I didn't paint them. I just didn't sped that amount of money. 

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We need a restored version of that chart as it has become a bit dingy with age. Would you mix a batch of paint based upon thor  paint chips? 😎

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1 hour ago, FlashBuddy said:

We need a restored version of that chart as it has become a bit dingy with age. Would you mix a batch of paint based upon thor  paint chips? 😎

no...I would choose the color based on what I think is right for the application.....

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I took the formula to the paint shop and they showed me a chip of what to expect.  Now a chip really doesn't show what the wheels will look like completely so you have to use some imagination.  Personally, I am so happy with the color because my truck is red and the "Dodge Truck Cream" in my opinion will look great and very 50's.  Bottom line, paint things the color that makes you happy!

Tom

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16 minutes ago, Plymouthy Adams said:

no...I would choose the color based on what I think is right for the application.....

“ I know you think you understand what you thought I said but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant”
-AG

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Dodge Job Rated Standard Colors 1950's.jpg

 

Can't even see the green or blue, ergo what kind of confidence can one have in any of the other colors.

Edited by FlashBuddy

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Round two today. What a difference too. Using all the knowledge shared here I was able to lay down a smooth even epoxy prime coat. 

 

This time, mixed the paint better. A little less hardener. A tad less air pressure (35 at the gun) and a wider spray pattern, but not full wide. The paint went on smooth and even, great coverage. No bald spots or drips and sags. I'll flip them over in the AM and start the outward facing sides. Maybe I can give them a couple hours then start shooting color. Thanks to all who have shred here. 

1950 Dodge B2B Wheels in Primer.jpg

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Mp 170 Epoxy isn't for sanding, its for sealing things up. Urethane is for sanding....that's the high build you want.

So you shoot the bare metal with Epoxy, then shoot it with a Urethane high build primer for shaping....then you can use the Epoxy again as a sealer.

Epoxy is tougher and harder than Urethane.

Urethane is soft for shaping with sanding.

The bummer is that so many brands try to be both.

I use MP170 (gray) and DTM 2004 as my high build. 

 

Steel wheels, brackets, etc will never need a Urethane....

 

48D

Edited by 48Dodger

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