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Starter Solenoid 1949 Chry Windsor

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Looking at the back of the starter I see the SOLENOID and on this SOLENOID  there are four terminals , the two on the bottom are large posts and above these are two small posts.

The large post on the bottom right goes to the battery, the large post on the left has a wire that goes to the choke. 

1.The small post on the top left has one wire that is grounded to the coil bracket yet the schematic shows this wire going to the arm on the reg, if I connect this wire to the ARM on the reg it makes a loud clicking sound .

2. The other small post on the right has two wires connected and I believe one of the wires is for the IGN switch, the other wire seems to have something to do with the turn signals as they are hot even with the key off 

 

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Here's where the shop manual helps.  My DeSoto manual  is probably close enough for a 49 Chrysler. 

Post with heavy cable from battery:   Power for the starter.  Also wires to power the horn relay, ammeter and cigar lighters (and convertible switch). 

Opposite post:  Wire from the ST post of the key switch. Turning the key all the way completes this circuit and eneregizes the solenoid, to make the heavy-amperage connection to the starter windings.

Post near the heavy cable post: Wire to the elecric choke:  When the solenoid is energized, this partially closes the Sisson choke.

Post kitty-corner from the heavy cable post:    Brown wire to the A post of the regulator.  The diagram shows a ground at the regulator, but also shows  a wire extending to the A post of the generator.  (On my 47 DeSoto, this provided a ground to the solenoid only when the generator was not running, so that the starter would not work when the engine was running.)

 

I hope this helps, but a diagram would be better.  But as Leslie Nielson told the frightened stewardess and reluctant pilot, "Good luck. We're all counting on you".

   

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Some more help and acouple pics of some of the styles of 42-52 starters and a wiring ID  picture...

The top inner small stud is the ground terminal of the starter relay.

It is wired to the generator or regulator "A" terminal so that when the generator is charging @ 7.2 or more volts it opposes the voltage flow from the IGN SW thus preventing someone accidentally engaging the starter.

With the engine off the and the generator not charging the generator armature is providing a ground for the starter relay.

Starters 1946-53 Chry DeSoto (4).JPG

Solenoid 1942-49 Chry DeSoto left 1950 Right.JPG

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The brake light switch is hydraulic so it is located near the master cylinder usually n a junction fitting where the line splits to go to the front brakes.

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I am too rewiring the engine bay. I too have questions about the wires on the horn relay. I have a schematic but when the terminals on the relay aren't marked its a guessing game.  On the pic above I believe #1 is the horn button and #4 is power from the starter, so that would leave #2&3 for horn feed and ignition. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Which is which.

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on 49 to 52 the brake light switch is on the frame just forward of the left rear wheel !

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Sounds like a really high resistance connection at the battery.  That, along with the starter current draw, got really hot. 

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